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Full text of "History of Toronto and county of York, Ontario, containing an outline of the history of the Dominion of Canada, a history of the city of Toronto and the county of York, with the townships, towns, villages, churches, schools, general and local statistics, biographical sketches, etc., etc Volume 2"

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HISTORY 


OF 


TORONTO AND COUNTY OF YORK 


ONTARIO; 


CONTAINING AN OUTLINE OF THE HISTORY OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA; 
A HISTORY OF THE CITY OF TORONTO AND THE COUNTY OF YORK, 
WITH THE TOWNSHIPS, TOWNS, VILLAGES, CHURCHES, 
SCHOOLS; GENERAL AND LOCAL STATISTICS; 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, ETC., ETC. 


!llustt'ateð. 


VOLUME II. 


TORONTO: 
C. BLACKETT ROBINSON, PUBLISHER. 
188 5. 



METRO?OLITAN 
TORONTO 
liBRARY 


CANADIAN HtSTORY 


JAN 1 7 Î

O 



CO NTENTS. 


. . . 


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 


PAGE. 


City of Toronto - 
York (East), Township of 
York (\Vest), Township of - 
Etobicoke, Township of 
Scarborough, Township of - 
Markham, Township of 
Markham, Village of 
Vaughan, Township of 
Richmond Hill, Village of 
King, Township of 
Aurora, Village of 
\Vhitchurch, Township of 
N ewmarket, Town of - 
East Gwillimbury, Township of - 
North Gwillimbury, Township of 
Georgina, Township of 


I 


- 179 


- 211 


- 245 
- 26 9 
- 28 5 
- 3 1 5 
- 3 2 9 
- 375 
- 379 
- 435 
- 447 
- 4 6 9 
- 4 8 7 
- 5
1 
- 5 0 9 



LIST OF ILLUSì'RA TIONS. 


James B. Boustead 
Thos. Bright 
John Bugg - 
W. H. Clinken broomer 
J ames Dobson 
John William Drummond 
Garrett F. Frankland - 
Andrew Heron 
John G. Howard - 
Mr. Howard's Tomb - 
John Jacques 
Robt. J affray 
J as. Michie - 
Hon. David Reesor 
George Percival Ridout 
Joseph D. Ridout - 
\Villiam Smith, sen'r - 
William Smith, jun'r 
John Smith - . 
Residence of John Smith 
S. Vernoy 
John Joseph Vickers 
Paul Kane - 
George Leslie 
Lakeview Park 
John Heron - 
Geo. Taylor - 
F. G. Percy - 


PAGE. 


- 13 
- 16 
- 17 
- 3 2 
- 4 1 
- 4- 2 
- 51 
- 64 
- 69 
- 80 
- 85 
- 86 


- 112 


- 134 
- 137 
- 137 
- 147 
- 147 
- 147 
- 14 8 
16 5 
- 166 
- 17 6 
- 19 6 
- 226 
- 27 1 
- 277 
- 3 21 



B lOG RA PHI C A L NOT ICE S. 


CITY OF TORONTO. 



 A:\IES ACHESON was born in the County of Leitrim, Ireland, 
,r vJ.-, 
 in 1810, being the sixth in a family of ten children. His parents 
't;--#- ï 'v-.- were Thomas Acheson and Elizabeth Clark. In 1822 the family 

) came to Canada and located on a cleared farm of two hundred 

 " and fifty acres near Brockville, where the mother died, aged 

\.5 ninety-four; in 18 4 1 the father returned to Ireland, where he 
died at the age of eighty-six. James Acheson spent his early 
life on the farm, and was educated in the common schools. In 1827 he 
went to Brockville to 'learn the trade of a tanner with Isaac Beacher; 
he spent four years there. In 1831 he came to Toronto and began work 
with the late Jesse Ketchum. In 1839 he started business for himself, east 
of the Don, in a tannery owned by one John Smith; but in two years he 
gave it up and went to Ireland for his health, where he remained eighteen 
months. On his return he built a tannery on Y onge Street and ran it for 
three years, at the end of which Mr. Ketchum gave him his business. He 
carried that on for three years, and then removed to Charles Small's farm 
on the Kingston Road, where he built a tannery, which was soon afterwards 
burned down. He.then occupied a tannery which was built on the present 
site of the Union Station. \Vhen that property was sold to the Grand 
Trunk Railway þe went to Acton, where hé built a tannery in partnership 
with Alexander McGlashan. On the latter's death, at the expiration of five 
years, 1\1r. Acheson retired and removed to Toronto, where he now li.ves at 
40 -Maitland Street. In politics he is a Reformer. In 1845 he married 
Mary, danghter of john Hamilton, by whom he had one child, now dead. 
2 



2 


Biographical Notices. 


\VILLIAM CASE ADA:\IS, dentist, was born in the ::\lethodist parsonage 
at Lundy's Lane, near Niagara, on the 18th October, 1823, and is the 
third son of the Rev. Ezra Adams, U. E. Loyalist and Methodist minister, 
whose first circuit, in 1814, extended from Rama, on Lake Simcoe, down 
Yonge Street to York, and west to St. Catharines and Newark (now Niag- 
ara), thence to Queenston and on to Long Point, taking six weeks for the 
trip. Owing to the lack of postal communication, 1\1r. Adams carried 
letters for such as wished, this being the only way then of conveying news 
to friends at a distance. The early education of Dr.' Adams was chiefly by 
his mother, who was a school teacher previous to her marriage. After 
spending some time studying he went to Victoria College, Cobourg, and from 
thence to Highblue, Missouri, where he commenced the study of medicine 
with Dr. Berryman. He returned to Canada and finally turned his atten- 
tion to dentistry, studying about a year with Dr. Harris and a year with 
a Dr. Jones, when he settled in Toronto, on King Street, in 1854. In 1870 
he was elected one of the teachers in the Dental College and Infirmary, 
which position he held until 1873. Dr. Adams is possessed of considerable 
mechanical skill, and has invented an appliance for removing roots and 
decayed stumps of teeth. \Vith this instrument stumps and roots can be 
removed from the mouth with ease when all other known methods have 
failed. He was admitted a member of the American Dental Convention at · 
Saratoga, which society changed its name from the American National 
Dental Convention in order to admit him and others from Canada. He is 
also a member of the Masonic body and Royal Arcanum, and is a member 
of the Methodist Church. ' 


\VILLIAM ADAMSON, wharfinger, was born in Heden, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, in 1822, being the second son in a family of six children. In the follow- 
ing year his father, Joseph Adamson, who was a doctor, came to Canada 
with his family, and located in the township of Toronto, where he continued 
the practice of his profession until his death in 1852. He purchased four 
hundred acres of land in that township; those farms are now in the posses- 
sion of his sons James and Alfred, and his daughter, Mrs. Shyman. 
During the Rebellion Dr. Adamson served as a surgeqn in the First Bat- 
talion of Incorporated Militia, under his brother, the Hon. Peter Adamson, 
who was colonel of the regiment. The Hon. Peter Adamson, R. J .S., was 
a member of the Legislative Council of Upper Canada until the Union in 
18 4 1 ; he came to Canada in 1821. Before he came out he had served for 
many years in the British army; he entered at the age of fifteen and rose 
to the rank of Major in the 71st Highlanders and Lieutenant-General in the 



City of. Toronto. 


3 


Portuguese serVIce. In 1853 the subject of this sketch was married to 
Rachael, eldest daughter of \Vm. Rutherford, by whom he had five sons 
and two daughters living. He served during the Rebellion in the First 
Battalion of Incorporated Militia as lieutenant under his uncle. It was in 
18 54 that he began business as a wharfinger. In religion Mr. Adamson is 
a member of the Church of England; in politics he is a Conservative. 
From 1864 to the present time he has represented St. David's and St. 
Thomas' \Vards in. the City Council. 


MAJOR D. H. ALLAN is a. native of Perth County, Ontario. His father, 
the late Rev. Daniel Allan, of Goderich, was one of the piòneer Presbyterian 
clergyman of \Vestern Outario. After several years of missionary service, 
he was for about forty years pastor of the North Easthope Presbyterian 
congregation. On retiring, which he did some nine years ago, he took up 
his residence in Goderich, where he died on the loth of December last, at 
the advanced age of seventy-nine years. His son, the subject of our present 
sketch, has been a resident of this city since 1866, and for two years studied 
law in the office of Paterson, Harrison & Paterson. For some reason or' 
another he gave up the idea of following the legal profession and engaged in 
business as real estate agent, in which line he has been more than ordinarily 
successful. Major Allan joined the Queen's Own Rifles as a private at the 
time of the Fenian Raids of 1866, and has kept up his connection with 
the regiment ever since; his soldierly and earnest attention given to all 
matters that would add to the reputation of his corps, receiving due reward 
in promotion as rapid as it is was deserved. He now holds a first-class 
Military Sch?ol certificate and is Senior l\lajor of his regiment. 
JEROME ALLEY, 519 Sherbourne Street, was born in Dublï"n, Ireland, in 
1810. He came to Canada in 1830, and taking an official position under 
Government served the State in various departments until 1874, when he 
retired. Mr. Alley has six children living, three sons and three daughters, 
viz., Henry R., Education Department; John A. M., accountant, Federal 
Bank; Alfred R., insurance agent, Chicago; Celia; Emma; and Kate, wife 
of Allan Harvey, Bank of British North America, London, England. 


JAMES ARMSTRONG was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, 1813, and 
-came to Canada in 1832. During the voyage he had a terrible experience 
of the dreaded disease cholera, which broke out on the vessel, and out of 
three hundred passengers thirty-one were committed to the deep. He was 
a farmer in Ireland and for some short time followed that occupation here, 
afterwards conducting a saw-mill in Bear Creek, which he continued some 



4 


Biograpkical Notices. 


years. During the Rebellion of '37 our subject was in 101 Company, 
commanded by Major Gurnètt, and was on guard during the execution of 
Lount and 
Iatthcws. After this affair was over Mr. Armstrong settled in 
Toronto. In 1840 he married Ann Durnan, whose father had charge of the 
lighthouse until 1854. Mr. Armstrong retired from business about six 
years ago, selling his farm for some property. He has two sons in Toronto. 
He is a member of the Conservative Party, and in religion belongs to the 
Presbyterian Church. 
THOMAS ARMSTRONG is a native of Fermanagh, Ireland, being the only 
son of John Armstrong, merchant, who came to Toronto about 1825, and 
died in 18+8. He was a member of the first Couns:il of this city on receiving 
its charter of incorporation, and represented the \Vard of St. Andrew's 
until the time of his death; the \Vard showing its appreciation of his 
success and honouring his memory by electing his son as successor. Mr. 
Thomas Armstrong in 1880 was appointed to a position in the Custom 
House. 
G. \V. BADGEROW, M.P.P., is a native of this county, born near 
l\1:arkham. His father, a native of the State of New York, came to Canada 
in 1810. Our subject received his professional education in this city, in 
the same building as his office is now located (Ontario Hall). He was 
called to the bar in 1871, and has since practised his profession in this 
city. He is Past Grand Master of the United \Vorkmen. He was elected 
a member of the Provincial Parliament in 1879 and re-elected in 1883. He 
is a member of the law firm of Badgerow & Galbraith. 
ALLEN BAINES, M.D., C.l\I., L.R.C.P., London, England, is a native 
of Toronto, being the youngest son of the late Thomas Baines, one of the 
pioneers of the brewing interest in this city, who was born in Shropshire
 
England, and came to Canada in 1826, and for a number of years was 
Crown Land Agent. He died in Toronto in 1866, at the age of sixty-seven. 
Dr. Allen Baines was educated at Mr. Barron's school, Cobourg, and at the 
Upper Canada College, Toronto. He graduated 1\1.B. in 1878 at Toronto 
University, and M.D., C.)!. in 1878 at Trinity College, Toronto. He 
studied at St. Thomas Hospital, London, England, and while there 
acquired, in 1879, L.R.C.P., London. He returned to this city and com- 
menced practice in 1882. He is at present physician in attendance at the 
Home for Incurables, Toronto Dispensary, and Infants' Home. 
DR. JAMES BUCHANAN BALDWIN is the son of\Villiam Augustus, second 
son of Dr. \ViUiam \Varren Baldw
n. \Villiam Augustus Baldwin was 



City of Toronto. 


5 


twice married; his first wife was Isabel Clarke Buchanan, daughter of 
J ames Buchanan, British Consul, N e
 York, by whom he had the 
following children: Phæbe, now Mrs. Lefroy, living in Toronto; James 
Buchanan, living in Toronto; \V. Augustus, l\I.D.; Robert Russel; Æmilias, 
living in :Muskoka; Isabel E., married to her third cousin, \Villiam Ross 
Baldwin, agent for the Duke of Devonshire, and now living in Ireland. His 
first wife died in 1850. By his second wife-Margaret Fry ::\lcLeod, 
daughter of Captain McLeod, Drynoch, Isle of Skye, of the 93rd High- 
landers-he had the following children: Jane McLeod, now l\Irs. Martin . 
Graham, living in Rome, N ew York; Bessie, now living in the old home- 
stead; Anna Maria Martin, who died 1883; Lawrence, living in the old 
home; :Margaret, Norman, Charles and John. Dr. James Buchanan 
Baldwin was born in Toronto, July 14th, 1839. In 1872 he married the 
second daughter of Hon. J. C. Morrison of the Court of Appeal. 


JOHN SPREAD BALDWIN, second son of Robert Baldwin, was married in 
1822, to Ann, daughter of Major-General Shaw, and widow of Dr. Scott of 
the Royal Navy, by whom he had the following children: Harriet E., 
dead; John, dead; Edmund, dead; Louisa Isabella, dead; John Maurice; 
Frederick A., dead; and Arthur Henry. Edmund Baldwin was born in 
Toronto in 1826, and married Miss Grasett, by whom he had two children, 
Dr. E. St. George Baldwin, 51 Baldwin Street, and Rev. Henry Grasett. 


The Hon. ROBERT BALDWIN was born in Toronto, l\Iay 12th, 1804, at 
the old home on the corner of Front and Frederick Streets, and died 
December 9th, 1858. He had the following children: Maria, died 1865; 
\Villiam \Villcocks Baldwin, Osgoode Hall; Augusta B., wife of the Hon. 
John Ross; Robert, 22 Carleton Street. \Villiam \Villcocks Baldwin was 
born May 20th, 1830. Up till 1864 he was farming, but since that- year he 
has held the position of Distributor of Law Stamp; at Osgoode Hall. 
ROBERT BALDWIN, deceased, came with his family from the County of 
Cork, Ireland (where the Baldwins, of Norman descent, had lived for 
generations), in 1799, and settled on a farm in the Township of Clark. He 
had the following children: \Villiam \Varren; Eliza, afterwards Mrs. John 
Morgan; Alice Anna 1\laria; John Spread, father of the late Canon 
Baldwin, of the present Bishop of Huron and of the Rev. A. H. Baldwin, 
of All Saints' Church; Mary \Varren. All his other surviving children 
also came to Canada between 1817 and 1819: Captain Augustus Baldwin 
(afterwards Admiral Baldwin); Captain Henry Baldwin; and Mrs. Sullivan, 
the mother of the late Judge Sullivan. \Villiam \Varren Baldwin was born 



6 


Biograplzical Notz'ces. 


in the County of Cork, Ireland, in 1771, and graduated with the degree of 
M.D. at Edinburgh, Scotland. After coming to Canada he began to 
practise his profession and subsequently adopted that of law; and it often 

appened that while attending to a case in one of the law courts he would 
be called away to attend to the case of a sick person. In 1803 he married 
Phæbe Margaret, daughter of \Villiam \Villcocks. At his death in January, 
1844, he left two sons, the Hon. Robert Baldwin and \Villiam A. Baldwin. 


JERROLD BALL, M.D., is a native of York County,-having been born on 
his father's old farm, where he lived until he was fifteen years of age. He 
attended the Public Schools and Grammar School in this city, matriculating 
in Toronto University in 1870, and graduating as M.B. four years later. 
He began the practice of medicine in 1875, which he has since continued 
with success. In 1881 he married Miss Emily Moore, of Toronto. 


J. BALMER, Superintendent of the Necropolis, was born in County Down, 
Ireland, on the 8th March, 1819. He joined Her Majesty's 38th Regiment 
of Foot in November, 1839. The Regiment until 1848 was stationed at 
Gibraltar, Ionian Islands, and Jamaica, when it was sent to Canada, and 
was stationed at Halifax for two years, then returned to England. Mr. 
Balmer remained in Canada, and joined the Royal Canadian Rifles. He 
was stationed at St. Johns, near Montreal. In 1856, when the Hudson 
Bay Company applied to the British Government for troops to protect their 
interests, which were threatened by the Indians, :\1r. Balmer was one of the 
hundred men who were sent by the Government, and who arrived at York 
Factory on the shores of Hudson Bay in August, 1857. After remaining 
at York Factory for two weeks, they went to Fort Garry where they re- 
mained four years. In 1861 he returned to St. Johns, and completed his 
time, receiving his discharge with Sergeant's pension in January, 1865. In 
1870 he came to Toront
, and in the following year became superintendent 
of the Necropolis, which position he still holds. In 1851 Mr. Balmer was 
married at St. Johns to a daughter of Robert Carey, of Sligo, Ireland. He 
has three sons, two of whom are Methodist ministers. The elder, Robert 
Henry, is stationed at St. \Villiam's (1884), and the other, \Villiam John, is 
an Undergraduate of Victoria University, Cobourg. His third son, George 
Francis, is a student in Upper Canada College, preparing for the University. 
His eldest daughter married Rev. J. B. Avison, who was pastor of the Don 
l\1ills Church (Methodist). He died in 1882. Mrs. Avison was again 
married to Rev. James Liddy, :\lethodist minister, in September, 1884. His 
second daughter Lina is married to G. T. Pendrith, machinist, of Toronto. 



City of Torontc. 


7 


\;VILLIAM BARCHARD, retired, was born in Ross, Yorkshire, England, 
m 1810. He was the fourth child of his father's family. His parents 
were Peter and Ross (Turner) Barchard. In 1829 he married Sarah 
Calvert, born August 21st, 1810. He and his wife came to Canada 
in 1833, and on Saturday, August 11th, landed at Toronto; the steamer 
" \Villiam IV." was burned to the water's edge that night. He first located on 
a farm in Vaughan Township, about three miles from Stone Hollow, where 
he worked for fourteen months for Aaron Barker, who was married to his 
wife's sister, and who paid him at the rate of $100 a year. He then went 
to work for a Dutchman named Baker, who was in the saw-mill business. 
In 1858 he began business for himself on the lot he now occupies, the whole 
extent of his capital at that time being $700. \Vith this sum he purchased 
a lot of lumber, and making it into boxes sold them to the city merchants; 
on this he realized such a profit as to form a foundation for what is now a 
prosperous business. 1Ir. Barchard is a Reformer, and a member of the 
-Methodist Church. By his marriage he had twelve children, of whom seven 
are now living. His eldest son, John Barchard, was living in Cincinnati at 
the breaking out of the American Civil \Var. He enlisted in the cavalry, 
and reached the rank of Captain, but was never heard of after the Battle of 
Gettysburg. Another son, George Edward, a brakeman, was killed at 
N ipissing by falling from a car. There are now two sons at home, \Villiam 
D. Henry, and Isaac James. 


JOHN BARRON was born m Cumberland, England, in 1827. In 1832 
his parents, John and Ann (Robson) Barron, came to Canada with their 
family, consisting of one son and four daughters. The family settled in 
Little York, and for ten years occupied a house in George Street, between 
Queen and Duchess Streets, which is still standing. About 1842 the father, 
who had been a farmér in England, took up fifty acres of land outside the 
city, on the east side of Yonge Street, where he lived until his death in 
1862, aged sixty-nine years; his wife died in 1872. John Barron, our subject, 
was educated in Toronto, and until he was twenty-five years of age worked 
with his father on the farm. In the spring of 1852 he came to the city and 
began the business in the Market Square, re
aining there for twenty-five 
years, when he removed to his present stand, 149 King Street East. Mr. 
Barron married Hannah Bond Herron, whose father was born in Toronto 
in 1807; she was the grand-niece of Captain Bond, who received large 
grants of land from the Crown. l\Ir. Barron has two sons and two 
daughters living in Toronto, John and \Villiam, l\Iary and Minnie. He is 
a member of the Methodist Church. 



8 


Biographical Notices. 


CHARLES R. BELL, real estate and insurance agent, was born in Milton, 
Cumberland, England, in 1820, being the only child of George and Mary 
(Ruddick) Bell. In 1835, when nearly sixteen years of age, he enlisted in 
the Cumberland Regiment, which, when formed, was known as the" Cum- 
berland Sharpshooters." In 1837 our subject, being an acting corporal, 
joined the regiment which was then stationed at Halifax. After spending 
some time in cities in the Maritime Provinces, he came to Toronto in the 
winter of 1837-38 and was made a staff-sergear..t, and was afterwards sta- 
tioned at Amherstburg for two years. On its return to England in 1840 
:\1r. Bell procured his discharge, and became a clerk in the office of Gamble 
& Boulton, on the recommendation of the late Lord Airey, remaining 
there ten years. In 1850 he became manager of Milton's mill on the Hum- 
ber, and in 1860 went to Pennsylvania, where he remained for two years 
engaged in railroad construction. On his return to Toronto he became 
book-keeper at Hurd & Leigh's, where he was until 1865, when he became 
connected with the firm of Hewlett & Bell. He has been engaged in his 
present business since 1878; and represents two insurance companies, the 
Royal and the Liverpool. In 1842 he married a daughter of James Ken- 
nedy, by whom he had five sons and one daughter. One son is dead. 


CHARLES T. BELL was born in Toronto in 1842, and is the son of 
Thomas and Catharine (Kendrick) Bell. His father was born in Little 
York, January 1st, 1803; his grandfather, Thomas Bell, senior, settling here 
before r800, and taking part in the war of 1812-14. His father was a 
Justice of the Peace, and lived for some time in Newmarket. Our subject 
is connected with the mail department of the postal service between Toronto 
and Hamilton. His wife is a daughter of David Ross, of Queen Street 
\Vest. 


ROBERT BELL, M.P.P., was born in Toronto, and is the eldest son of 
John Bell, builder and contractor, who came to Canada from County 
Fermanagh, Ireland, in 1823; married, in 1827, Annie Anderson, and died 
in 1855. In 1853 Robert married Matilda, seventh daughter of Joseph 
Clegg, C.E., of County Monåghan, Ireland. In 1860 he was elected coun- 
cilman for the .\Vard of St. Andrew's, and served in that capacity until 
1867, when he became an alderman until 1873. In 1872 he was elected to 
the Board of \Vater Commissioners, and in 1874 was made chairman of 
that body until its extinction in 1877. In 1875 he was first elected to 
represent \Vest Toronto in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, and was 
re-elected in 1879. 



City of Toronto. 


9 


THOMAS BERNEY, caretaker of the Riverdale Park, is ::1 native of the 
North of Ireland (Strabane), and came to Canada in 1850. He was variously 
engaged up to 1854, after which he kept an hotel on Yonge Street for about 
ten years. In 1880 he accepted the position as head caretaker of this 
beautiful park. 


THOMAS BEST was born near Darlington, in the County of Durham, 
England, in .1821. He came to Canada in 1843, and engaged in the hotel 
business in Toronto. He was connected with the Bay Horse Hotel from 
1844 to 1872, and has been Jiving retired since the latter date at 33 l\lurray 
Street. Mr. Best was married in 1849 to Elizabeth Tindale; the issue of 
the marriage was five children. We may add that Mr. Best is one of the 
oldest living hotel proprietors in the city. 


DR. N OR:\fAN BETHUNE is the son of the late Angus Bethune, who was 
born, in 1793, at Carleton Island, in the River St. Lawrence, opposite 
Kingston; his grandfather, the Rev. John Bethune, of Williamstown, Glen- 
garry, was chaplain to H. 1\1. 84th Regiment, which was then stationed on 
that island. The Rev. John Bethune had the following sons: Angus 
Norman, who settled in Montreal, and was a merchant and Queen's auc- 
tioneer; John, who became Dean of the Church of England Cathedral 
at Montreal; James, who lived at Cobourg; Alexander Neil, who became 
Bishop of Toronto; and Donald a well-knpwn steamboat proprietor. Angus 
Bethune was engaged in the North-\Vest and Hudson Bay Company's 
service for fifty years. He came to Toronto in 1840, and at his death left 
five sons, Norman being the second. His wife was a daughter of Roderick 
Mackenzie. Dr. Norman Bethune was born at 1Vloose Factory, Hudson's 
Bay. He came to Toronto in 1840, was educated at Upper Canada College, 
and in ì843 began his medical studies. He graduated in the University of 
Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1850, and in the following year began his practice 
in Toronto, which he has since continued with the exception of nine years 
in which he practised in Edinburgh. Dr. Bethune was for many years 
connected with the Medical School attached to Trinity College, in the 
.organization of which he was largely interested. 


JOSEPH BICKERSTAFF was born in the County of Armagh, Ireland, in 
1832, and came to Canada in 1851. He located in Toronto, and began 
business as a grocer, which he continued for twenty years. In 1881 he 
received an appointment in the Custom House, and has charge of the 
Queen's \Varehouse. He is a member of the Orange Society, and the 



10 


Biographical Notices. 


Church of England. He is a Conservative in politics. Mr. Bickerstaff 
married Elizabeth Moore, of this city; her father was Captain of a Company 
during the Rebellion of 1837. 


JOHN BISHOP, retired, was born in Islington, near London, England, 
December 16th, 1799. His parents were John and Sarah Bishop. His 
father was a butcher, and previous to his arrival in Canada conducted a 
large business in London. He arrived in New York in 1816, from thence 
he removed to Toronto, and erected a small cottage in which the family 
lived for a short time, afterwards removing to a house on the west side of 
:Market Square, which he built along with others in 1819. He followed his 
own trade successfully for a number of years, retiring from active participa- 
tion in the business in 1833, being succeeded by his son \Villiam. In 1829 
he built Bishop Buildings on Adelaide Street, a large row of brick houses, 
which are still standing. He died December 25th, 1845, aged seventy- 
five years, leaving a family of five children, of whom John was the second. 
\Villiam, the third son, succeeded to the .father's business, continued 
the same until 1852, when he retired. l\1:r. Bishop was a member of the 
old fire company in 1826. In politics he is a Reformer. In 1831 he 
married Jane Julia Rubergall, who died in 1841; his second wife was. 
Christiana Ferrier, second daughter of the late R. C. Ferrier, baker. 


FRANCIS BLACKSTONE, professor of music, was born in Chelsea, Bromp- 
ton, England, in 1844, son of G"eorge Blackstone. His mother was a 
daughter of John Sartoris, who painted the celebrated racehorse Eclipse. 
He came to Toronto in 1871, where he has since lived, following the pro- 
fession of music teacher. 


JOHN NETTERVILLE BLAKE, President of the Lake Simcoe Junction 
Railway, and for several years President of the Toronto Brewing and 
Malting Company, was born in Toronto in 1846. His father, the Rev. 
D. E. Blake, was born in \Vicklow, Ireland, in 1806, and came to Canada in 
1832. He was appointed by the Governor-General Rector of Adelaide, and 
settled in that Township; subsequently he became Rector of Thornhill, 
County of York, where he resided for many years. The subject of this 
sketch begaI1 to study law in 1863, and was called to the bar in 1869. In 
1873 he originated the Lake Simcoe Junction Railway, and in 1880 became 
President of the Toronto Brewing and Malting Company. He is largely 
interested in the malting business. He is a Conservative, and a member 
of the York Pioneers. 



City <Jf Toronto. 


I I 


JOSEPH BLOOR, deceased, was born in Staffordshire, England, in 1789, 
where he acquired his education and spent the earlier portion of his life. 
He married Sarah Lees of the same place, and in 1819 came to Canada and 
settled in the County of York with his family. He located in Toronto,_ 
where he kept an hotel on King Street, and a few years later purchased a 
tract of land In Y orkville, east of Y onge, and opened out the great thorough- 
fare in the north of the city which bears his name. He divided his land 
into lots and erected many private buildings, and also engaged in the 
brewing business for a period of twenty years. He held a magistrate's 
commission; in politics was strongly Conservative; and though in early 
life a member of the English Church, he subsequently identified himself 
with the Methodist Church, of which he proved"a useful and earnest 
supporter, and contributed largely to the erection of the Bloor Street place 
of worship belonging to that body. After his death an appropriate slab 
was placed within the church to his memory by the congregation. Mr. 
Bloor was a member of the old Fire Brigade of York, and also of the St. 
George's Society. At his death he left two daughters, Sarah and Eliza, 
the latter married M. \V. 
rowne, of Hamilton. 


JOHN BOND was born in Devonshire, England, in 1810, and came to 
Canada with his father when quite a child. His father was a sergeant- 
major in the British Army and served in the war of 1812-14, having fought at 
Lundy's Lane, Chippewa, Fort Erie and Queenston Heights. He received 
his discharge at Kingston in 1817, and engaged afterwards in contracts for 
the G
vernment. He died in tþis city on July 4th, 1853. His son, whose 
name appears at the head of this s
etch, passed his early life in Kingston,. 
removing from thence to this city in 1834; and having previously learned 
his trade of cabinet-maker, commenced business at 154 King Street East, 
which he conducted for thirty years, afterwards retiring. Mr. Bond served 
with credit during the Rebellion of '37, and was sergeant in the corps com- 
manded by Colonel Thomas. \Ve ought not to omit to mention that his 
father had charge of the cannon at the skirmish of Montgomery's tavern. 
Mr. Bond is a devoted adherent of the Roman Catholic faith, and in 
politics has thrown in his lot with the Reform Party. He married, in 
1833, Catharine Gorman. 


GEORGE BOSTWICK. The grandparents of our subject, John and Mary 
(Lardner) Bostwick, were of English origin, having emigrated from England 
to the U ni
ed States previous to the American Revolution. They took up 
their residence upon the present site .of the city of Baltimore. The grand- 



12 


Biographical Notices. 


mother was a niece of the Rev. Dionysius Lardner, LL.D., F.R.S. (Fellow of 
the Royal Society of Edinburgh). Baltimore was the birthplace of a numer- 
ous progeny of descendants, of which Lardner, the father of our subject (so 
named in honour of the illustrious divine) was born in 1774; his early life 
was passed in that city until 1808, when he came to Niagara, where he 
married Sarah Bradshaw, and came to York two years later. He was a 
participant in the battle of York during the \Var of 1812, and was also a 
prisoner at its capitulation. After peace was declared he drew three 
hundred and fifty acres of land in the London dis"trict, although he never 
deared or improved it. In 1810 he purchased one and one-fourth acres 
upon the south-east corner of King and Y onge Streets, for which he paid 
three hundred and fifty dÇ)llars, which he retained until his death. Upon 
this property he erected suitable buildings and embarked in the manufacture 
of carriages, in which business he was engaged for many years. In politics 
he was a Baldwin Reformer, and sat in the old Council of York with \Vm. 
Lyon Mackenzie, when the city was first incorporated. His death occurred 
in 1834, at which time he left a family of seven children-three sons and 
four daughters. George, our subject, was the second eldest, born at York, 
on the 22nd March, 1811. He received his early education at the primitive 
schools of that day, and early acquired of his father the trade of carriage 
making. Upon the death of the latter he succeeded him in business, which 
he conducted for several years. In 1836 l\1r. Bostwick took up his residence 
on the west side of Y onge Street, on the northern portion of what was then 
the city limits, and was elected a member of the Council Board in the 
Village of Y orkville. In 1850 he was commissioned magistrate by th
 late 
Hon. Robert Baldwin,.in which capacity he has ever since acted. During 
the crisis of '37 he firmly adhered to the principles of responsible govern- 
ment as advocated by the Reform party, and has since lived to see those 
blessings shared in by those who were then his strongest political enemies. 
In 18
0 Mr. Bostwick married a daughter of Robert Ferrier, from Aberdeen- 
shire, Scotland, by whom he had one son and four daughters. His son, 
George F. Bostwick, represents the extensive manufacturing firm of Goldie 
& McCulloch, safe manufacturers, of Galt, Ont., whose office and ware- 
rooms are at No. 50 Church Street, Toronto. The second daughter married 
John S. Mayfair, of the old-established wholesale dry-goods house of Bryce, 
McIvIurrich & Co., Yonge Street; third, Mrs. J. H. Macdonald; fourth, 
Mrs. David Denne, of Montreal; fifth, Jessie, resides at home. Lardner, 
brother of our subject, was born at York, June 20th, I815; educated at 
Thomas Appleton's district school at the old market place on Ki!1g Street; 
1837, was a student with Dr. Morrisol1; 1842, he married Eliza Kennedy; 



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City of Toronto. 


13 


one year later moved to Chicago, where he was three years engaged in the 
dry-goods business; then settled at ::\Iinneapolis, where he studied law and 
was admitted to the Bar, and subsequently elected Judge of the Surrogate 
Court. 


JAMES B. BOUSTEAD IS the only son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Bell} 
Boustead, ami was born at Carlisle, Cumberland, England, in 1833. His 
father was educated for an Episcopal clergyman. but after completing his 
education, he emigrated to the County of York, Upper Canada, and settled 
at Newtonbrook in the year 1832, where he died in January following
 
leaving a son and daughter, of whom our subject was the youngest. After 
completing his education, at the age of twenty-one he entered the well- 
known dry-goods house of John Macdonald, remaining one year, then for 
the five years following he had charge of a large milling business at Hills- 
burg. In 1857 he returned to Toronto, and engaged in the wholesale 
provision trade until 1874, when he became connected with the fire and 
life insurance business, which he has conducted until the present time. 
He now represents the" Citizens," and" Union Scottish" Companies, and 
is also an issuer of marriage licenses, and a magistrate for the County of 
York. Mr. Boustead was elected to a seat in the City Council Board as- 
early as 1865, first representing St. David's and later St. James' \Vards ; he 
filled the position for sixteen years, being one of the most active members of 
that honourable body. During the long period he sat in the Council he 
filled the position of chairman of some of its most important committees, 
notably the Fire, \Vater, and Gas Committees, and is entitled to the credit 
of reorganizing the Fire Department, and establishing the Fire Alarm 
system; he also obtamed for the city, through his earnest exertiops, the 
charter under which our present water-works were built, and which resulted 
in obtaining pure water from the lake. Mr. Boustead has taken a great 
interest in our educational institutions, having been a member of the School 
Board for some years. \Vhen the" Queen's Own" was organized he was 
one of its first members, and he received his commission of Lieutenant; he 
was present and took part with his regiment at Ridgeway; he retired in 
186 7 with the rank of Captain. Mr. Boustead has also been actively 
engaged in church work, having been SuperintendeI1.t of the Methodist 
Sabbath school in Yorkville from 1866 to 1876, and of the Metropolitan 
Methodist Sabbath school from 1878 to the present time. His life has been 
an active and busy one, and he has left his mark upon the city which he has. 
made his home. 



14 


Biographical Notices. 


SA:\tuEL BOWMAN, retired, was born in the County Derry, Ireland, in 
1812. His father was John Bowman, a farmer, and his mother a daughter 
of Joseph Thompson; they had seven children. The family came to 
Canada in 1832, landing at Quebec on June 4th. They remained at Quebec 
a few days and. then went to Montreal, where, four days after they arrived, 
the father and one of the sons died. The family arrived at Toronto, August 
9th, and took up their residence in a house on Y onge Street io which a man 
had died" of cholera that morning, but fortunately none of them were 
infected. Samuel Bowman obtained work at teaming for a Mr. Clinkin- 
broomer, with whom he remained six months; then he became a porter in 
a store, helping a man named \Vare, on the corner of King and Y onge 
Streets. In 1838 he commenced carting, and continued that until 1850, 
when he sold out and retired. During the Mackenzie Rebellion Mr. Bow- 
man joined an independent company, and was present at the burning of 
Montgomery's tavern. 1\1r. Bowman has only one brother living now; he 
resides at 142 Nelson Street. 


\VILLIAM BRIGGS was born in Hull, Yorkshire, England, 1818, and 
-came to Toronio in 1845. He is a builder and contractor, which business 
he conducted from the tiTI?e of his arrival in the city until recently, when he 
retired from it, and is at present enjoying the ease and comfort he has 
deservedly earned. Mr. Briggs was the first settler on the fifteen acre lot 
where he resides (No. 9 Maitland Street). His wife was Mary 11achin, 
a native of Selby, Yorkshire, England; she died in 1850. 


JOHN BRIGHT. The Bright family are of English origin. John, the 
subject of this sketch is at the present time the eldest white male resident 
-of T
ronto. He was born at Three Rivers, Quebec, 1793, fourth son of 
Louis and Margaret (Brady) Bright, and came to York with his parents in 
1802, berng nine years of age. His father served seven years in the 42nd 
Regiment of His Majesty's Infantry during the Revolutionary \Var, at the 
close of which he came to Canada, having but three weeks to serve, when 
he arrived on what is now called King Street. Here he rented a slab 
shanty situated between York and Bay Streets (of a coloured man by the 
name of Franklin), into which he moved his family and wrought for some 
time as a stone-mason, but subsequently settled down to farming and 
butchering. He died at the ripe age of ninety-nine years and ten months, 
leaving six sons and six daughters. John attended the first school held in 
the county, on the corner of King and George Streets, Mr. Elihu Pease 
being the first teacher; at the age of thirteen was burned out and learned 



City of Toronto. 


15 


the trade of shoemaker, of Mr. \Vallace, serving six years, which business 
he afterwards conducted for over forty years. He married in r808, Nancy, 
third daughter of \\ïl1iam Knott, a Revolutionary soldier who came to 
Canada with the "Queen's Rangers," and afterwards settled upon King 
Street, just east of the 1\Iail buildings. Mr. Bright participated in the \Var 
of 1812, was at the battles of York, Stony Creek, Queenston Heights and 
Lundy's Lane. In the latter engagement he received three wounds-first, 
by a bullet on the top of his head, taking off a portion of the scalp; second, 
through the sleeve of the right arm; and third, a shot in the left side. He 
belonged to the Infantry Corps, and at the battle of Queenston Heights he 
saw General Brock fall from his little bay mare which he rode, it having 
been presented to him by Adjutant Fitzgerald, or "Crazy Fitzgerald" as 
he was sometimes called. He saw his body carried from the battle-field 
by orderlies into a barn near by; was present at his death and burial. 
" \Ve cried like good fellows when he fell." Mr. Bright was in the last 
<::harge made upon the army at Queenston Heights, and saw many of the 
Americans leap over the side of the mountain in their efforts to escape, 
,vhile others stole away amid the clouds of smoke that enveloped the place. 
After serving his time Colonel Fitzgerald tried to induce the regiment to 
which he belonged to re-enlist for three years by offering every able-bodied 
man three guineas; but they, not having had a change of clothing for three 
months, declined and returned home; after which he serve.d twenty-seven 
years as assistant messenger under his father, who was chief messenger of 
the old Legislative Council of Upper and Lower Canada, while the Govern- 
ment buildings were at Toronto, Kingston and Montreal. He was present 
at the latter place when the buildings were burned. He also served twenty- 
seven years as Crier of the General Sessions and County Court, which 
,office he still holds. During the Rebellion of 1837 he was a volunteer, while 
his father was doing garrison duty at the Parliament House. He and his 
brother Louis shouldered their muskets and joined the loyal forces at 
Montgomery's tavern. He retains his mental faculties in a wonderful 
-degree, and nothing affords him greater pleasure than to have an old friend 
or neighbour call and recount bygone scenes of his early life. 


JA:\IES BRIGHT, 71 King Street East, blacksmith, and brother of the 
above, is the youngest son of the same family, was born in York in 1807, 
corner of Princess and Duke Streets. vVhen fifteen years of age he learned 
the trade of blacksmith with his brother Louis, whose shop then occupied 
the north-east corner of King and York Streets, where the Shakespeare 
Hotel now stands. They wrought together for five years. In 1832 he 



16 


Bz"ograpltical Notz"ces. 


married Amelia, daughter of Isaac Columbus, who was employed in the 
Garrison, being edge-tool maker and silversmith. He made a sword for 
General Brock, which he carried on the day of his death. Soon after Mr. 
Bright's marriage he moved east of the Don and took up his residence at 
71 King Street East, where he established himself in business as a black- 
smith, and where he has ever since resided. Having seven sons and two 
daughters, the former having succeeded him in business. 


JOHN .BRIGHT, builder, was born in Toronto in 1842, his father being 
J ames Bright. He learned the trade of a carpenter before he was of age 
and worked at that until 1872, when he opened a grocery, flour and feed 
store on King Street East. In 1875 he gave up store-keeping and returned 
to his trade. In 1870 he married Emiline Louisa, daughter of Emerson 
Coatsworth, City Commissioner. He is a Conservative and a member of 
the English Church. 


THOMAS BRIGHT, youngest son of John Bright, was born at Toronto 1837, 
was seven years engaged in the grocery trade, subsequently succeeded hIS 
father as Sheriff's Officer and Crier of the Court of General Sessions, which 
office he has held for the past twenty-two years, and which has been filled 
by some member of the family since the establishment of the first Court in 
York. Mr. Bright has been twice married, first to Mary, daughter of 
Robert Hodgson, by whom he had four children, second to Ellen Brady. 
In politics he has been a strong Conservative, and a member of the Orange 
Society, and Church of England. 


\VILLIAM BRODIE, L.D.S., was born in Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, 
Scotland, and was the son of George Brodie, a farmer in that district, who 
came to Canada in 1835, and settled on a farm in \Yhitchurch, where he 
died in 1882, at the advanced age of ninety years. During his residence in 
\Vhitchurch he took a lively interest in municipal affairs, and was for some 
time a member of the County Council. He was for a number of years an 
elder of the Presbyterian Church. He married Jane IVlilne, of.Banff, only 
daughter of John Milne of that town, a vessel own-er, who was lost at sea; 
she died in 1865 at \Vhitchurch. Mr. Brodie, the subject of this sketch, 
received his early education at Whitchurch, subsequently teaching school 
there for three years. He afterwards studied his profession, which he 
practised in Markham for two years, removing to Toronto in 1865. He has 
from its commencement been connected with the Toronto Natural History 
Society, and to his energy the institution may be almost said to owe its 
existence. He married l\Iiss J ane 
nna McPherson, eldest daughter of 



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City of Tor01lto. 


17 


Alexander McPherson, farmer, of Scotch birth, who, as a contractor, had 
assisted in the construction of the Lachine Canal. He died at Whitby. 
Mr. Brodie's residence is 325 Parliament Street. 


JOHN BUGG, deceased, the eldest of a family of seven children, born 
to William and Elizabeth (Walker) Bugg, was born in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, February 6th, 1807. His early life was spent upon his father's farm. 
Before he reached his majority he learned the trade of carriage and house 
building. Upon the death of his father he, being the eldest son, inherited 
all the property. After paying all claims upon the estate, he embarked for 
Canada, and arrived at Little York on June 19th, in the spring of 1831. It 
being Sunday, he immediately wended his way to church, and there found 
an old acquaintance in the resident pastor, who introduced him to Mr. 
Cawthra, then employed in the erection of the Ontario Parliament buildings, 
with whom he secured employment. After remaining in York one year he 
returned to England and brought the family back with him. After the com- 
pletion of the Government work he began bUIlding for himself, and subse- 
quently embarked in the lumbering and building business on a large scale, 
his yard being at the corner of Teraulay and Albert Streets. He also dealt 
largely in real estate, and purchased the McCauley estate, and opened Ger- 
rard and \Valton Streets. In 1837, during the Rebellion, the loyal forces 
were quartered at his residence, as at those of many others who were strong 
Reformers and advocated Responsible Government. Our subject took an 
'lctive part in municipal matters, and was elected to a seat in the Council 
Board for St. Patrick's \Vard, when that \Vard included the district at 
present covered by St. John's, St. Stephen's and St. Patrick's. \Vhen St. 
Patrick's Ward w
s subsequently divided he sat as alderman for St. John's 
\tVard, his term of service being thirteen years, and on every occasion but 
one he was returned at the head of the poll. As an alderman he united a 
progressive spirit with a careful regard to economy, a watchfulness over 
the city's interests, and a firm adherence to his principles. As an instance 
of his firmness of character, it may be mentioned that for several years he 
formed one of a minority, composed of four aldermen, who strenuously 
Dpposed a number of measures which they considered detrimental to the 
city's interests. In religion he was a Primitive Methodist, and was elected a 
life mE-mber of the Conference of that body. Soon after ConÍederation he 
was commissioned a Magistrate, in which capacity he acted many yéars. 
His wife was a daughter of the late John Purkiss, of Toronto. The fiftieth 
anniversary of their wedded life was celebrated on the 30th October, 1883. 
At his death he left three sons and two daughters: \'-Tilliam, Charles, 
Joseph, Elizabeth and Sarah, now Mrs. Robert Jaffray. 
3 



18 


Biographical Notices. 


JAMES BUGG, farmer, and brother of the above, was fourteen years and 
six months old when he landed in York in 1833. He worked about one year 
for Mr. Northcott; the following spring he went to Thornhill and worked 
on a farm for about ten years; then was engaged as manager on a farm in 
Markham Township. In 1844 he married Rebecca, second daughter of 
Robert Mason, by whom he has three daughters. In 1850 he was chosen 
councillor for Markham Township, and in 1870 he received a Magistrate's 
commission, but did not qualify until ten years later. In politics he is a 
Reformer, in religion a member of the Primitive Methodist Church. As 
a result of many years of honest toil, he has a beautiful farm in the Town- 
ship of King, where he at present resides, and is one of the most substantial 
citizens in his municipality. 


ALEXANDER BURNS was born in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, 
Ireland, in 1837, and came to Canada in 1853' Previoùs to coming out he 
was for a short time in the grocery business, and on his arr.ival in Toronto 
continued the same business with his brother in a store at St. Lawrence 
Market. In 1869 he commenced a soda-water business on the corner of 
Young and Buchanan Streets, that part of the city being then all bush, 
which extended without a single break along the front of Y onge and College 
Avenue to Hayter Street. The trade conducted by Mr. Burns was one of 
the largest of its kind in the city, and proved very successful. He retired 
from business in 1881, since which time he has been living a quiet and 
retired life on the fruits of his former industry. In 1868 he married Miss 
Martha McDonald, by whom he has a family of three sons and three 
daughters. 


DAVID BURNS, deceased, was born in the County Derry, Ireland, in 
1803. He came to Canada in 1823, and engaged in the leather business at 
Little York, which proved so successful that he retired about twenty years 
before his death, which occurred in 1872. At the time of his death he' 
owned a considerable quantity of real estate. He left surviving him a wife 
and three sons. The eldest, David Burns, is a civil engineer; the second, 
Robert, is studying medicine; and the youngest, Stephen, is engaged in the 
study of the law. . 


.HORATIO C. BURRITT, M.D., C.M., was born at Smith's Falls, Ontario, 
in September, 1840. He is the eldest son of Dr. Walter H. Burritt, who 
was born at Burritt's Rapids, Ontario, in 1809; being the youngest son of 
Cðlonel Daniel Burritt and grandson of Daniel Burritt, one of the original 
United Empire Loyalists, who .emigrated to Canada immediately after the 



City of Toronto. 


19 


American Revolution, and settled on the Rideau River, where the Village 
of Burritt's Rapids now stands. The subject of our sketch was educated at 
Smith's Falls Grammar School, Bishop's College, Lennoxville, and McGill 
College, Montreal, from which latter institution he received the degree of 
M.D., C.M., in 1\lay, 1863' He spent some months, after graduating in Lin- 
coln Hospital, \Vashington, D.C., as acting assistant surgeon during the 
American Civil \V ar. Sh
rtly after returning to Canada he settled in 
Morrisburgh, Ontario; in 1868 he removed to Peterborough, where he had a 
very extensive and lucrative practice for fourteen years; when he began to 
feel that if the incessant hard work, with the exposure, etc., were continued 
much longer it would seriously impair his health. To avoid such a calamity 
he disposed of his practice to Dr. Halliday, of Grafton, and removed to 
Toronto. On his departure from Peterborough he was presented with a 
most complimentary address and a magnificent epergne, by many of his 
staunch friends. In 1880 he was elected by the medical men of Newcastle 
and Trent Electoral Division, as their representative for five years In the 
Ontario Medical Council. Daring his two years' residence in this city, he 
has acquired a successful and extensive practice. Dr. Burritt married in 
1864-, Maria Harriet, fourth daughter of James G. Rogers, Esq., of Grafton, 
Ontario: 


EPHRAIM BUTT, third son of Samuel Butt, wea'Ter, ,vas born in Stone- 
house, Gloucester, England, on the 8th of March, 1822. His father, 
with his family, came to Canada and settled in Toronto, in the year 1832. 
He has been a resident of Toronto for fifty-two years. In 1844 he married 
Sarah, youngest daughter of James Davey, of Hull, England, by whom he 
had sixteen children. Of these only four survive, viz.: the eldest, Samuel 
James; Mary (now Mrs. J. H. H. Mottram, Detroit, U. S.); George (of To- 
ronto); and the youngest, Henry John \Vilkinson (of Detroit, U. S.). For forty 
years he has successfully carried on the general business of waggon-mak- 
ing, and for a number of years past of blacksmithing. Both 1\1r. and l\Ir
. 
Ephraim Butt have been äevout members of the Wesleyan Methodist 
denomination since 1842, and since the year 1854 the former has been a 
class-leader. He is a brother of James Butt, whose first wife, now deceased, 
was a sister of Mrs. Ephraim Butt. 


JAMES BUTT, retired, was born in Gloucestershire, England, in 1815. 
His parents were Samuel and Anne (Smith) Butt. His mother's brother 
Charles was killed at the battle of Trafalgar, where he fought under Lord 
Nelson. His father came to Little York (now Toronto) in 1832, with his 
wife and seven children, of whom five are living and two are dead; he was 



20 


Biograpltical Notices. 


a gardener by occupation, and worked for Dr. "Vidmer until his death in 
18 43. James Butt first worked for Mrs. Major Small, and then spent three 
years in learning the blacksmith trade with James Bright, who lived east 
of the Don. At the time of the Rebellion he was working for Louis Bright, 
who had a blacksmith shop in Toronto, where they did some work for the 
Government. In 1839 he commenced business for himself on Shuter 
Street, and continued it until 1867, when he r
tired. In 1840 he married 
Mary, daughter of James Davey, of Yorkshire, England, by whom he had 
five children; three are dead, and two-Charles E., living in Plainfield, 
New Jersey, and Richard H., living in Toronto-still survive. His first 
wife died in 1870, and he afterwards married Jane, daughter of John Purkiss, 
of Toronto. He has been connected with the Methodist Church since 1835. 


HON. CHIEF JUSTICE M. C. CAMERON, Toronto. Matthew Crooks 
Cameron, son of John McAlpin Cameron, was born at Dundas, Ontario, on 
the 2nd day of October, 1822. His father was a descendant of the Camerons 
of Fassifern, Scotland, and emigrated from Inverness-shire to Upper 
Canada, in 1819, settling at Dundas, where he engaged in the mercantile 
business; subsequently discharged the -duties of Deputy-Postmaster under 
Thomas Allen Stayner, then the Imperial Postmaster-General for Canada, 
at Hamilton,. -ami also Deputy-Clerk of the Crown for the then Gore Dis- 
trict. Later he was student-at-Iaw with Sir Allan MacNab, with whom he 
remained until he was appointed to the first permanent clerkship of com- 
mittees in the P
uliament of Upper Canada, from which office he went to 
the Canada Company's office in Toronto, where he held an important posi- 
tion for many years. Coming to this part of the country as he did, when it 
was yet undeveloped, sparsely settled, and engaging in active life, 1'.1r. 
Cameron became weIland widely known. He died in Toronto in November, 
1866, aged seventy-nine years. The name of our subject's mother was 
Nancy Foy, a native of Northumberland, England. The education of 
Matthew Crooks Cameron was obtained first at a school at Hamilton, 
under a Mr. Randall, and afterwards the District School in Toronto, which 
he attended for a short time. In 1838 he entered Upper Canada College, 
where he studied until 1840, when in consequence of an accident when out 
shooting by which he lost a leg, he had to retire. Two years later he 
entered the office of Messrs. Gamble & Boulton, of Toronto, as student- 
at-law, where he remained until Hilary Term, 1849, when he was called to 
the bar of the Province of Ontario (then Upper Canada). He engaged in 
Toronto in the practice of his profession, first with Mr. Boulton, his former 
master. This firm continued until the law partnership of Messrs. Cayley 



City of Toronto. 


21 


& Cameron was formed, the senior member being the Hon. \Villiam 
Cayley, an English barrister, and at one time Inspector-General of the 
Province. In 1859 Dr. McMichael entered, the firm then becoming -Messrs. 
Cayley, Cameron & McMichael. Later Mr. Cayley retired, and Mr. E. 
Fitzgerald became a partner in the business, and his name added- to the 
name and style of the firm, remaining so for several years. On the retire- 
ment of Mr. Fitzgerald, 1\1r. Alfred Hoskin became a partner, and it 
remained Cameron, McMichael & Hoskin until the senior member's eleva- 
tion to the Bench in November, 1878. His appointment was the recogni- 
tion of true merit and legal abllity. As a lawyer he was eminent in every 
department of his profession, but particularly excelled before a jury; 
possessing an excellent power of analyzing and arranging facts, combined 
with an impressive manner of speaking, he delivered his arguments with a 
logical force and clearness rarely surpassed. The same qualities of mind 
may also be said to render his rulings and decisions on the Bench equally 
clear and explicit. He was created a Queen's Counsel in 1863, and elected 
a Bencher of the Law Society of Ontario in 1871. The first public office 
held by Chief Justice Cameron was that of a Commissioner, with Colonel 
Coffin, appointed by the Government in 1852, to enquire into the causes of 
accidents, which had been of frequent occurrence. on the Great \Vestern 
Railway. From 1859, when he represented St. James's \;Yard in the City 
Council, he figured prominently in public life. In 1861, and again a few 
years later, at the solicitation of many citizens, he contested the Mayoralty 
unsuccessfully. In 1861 he entered the arena of political life, and sat for 
North Ontarið, in the Canada Assembly, from the general election of that 
year until the general election of 1863, when he was defeated. But in July, 
1864, he was re-elected for the same seat, which he continued to hold until 
Confederation, when he was again unsuccessful. At the general Provincial 
election in 1867 he was returned to the Ontario Parliament from East 
Toronto, and re-elected In 1871 and 1875. He was a member of the Execu- 
tive Council in Ontario in the Sandfield-Macdonald Administration, from 
July 20, 1867, until the resignation of the Ministry, December 19, 1871, and 
with the exception of the last five months of this period, when he was Com- 
missioner of Crown Lands, he held the offices of Provincial Secretary and 
Registrar. He was also leader, and a very able one, too, of the Opposition, 
from the general election in Decemb
r, 1871, until appointed to the Judge- 
,ship in the Qu-een's Bench, in November. 1878, which position he held unti 
appointed Chief Justice of the Common Pleas in [884. \Vhile in politics 
Judge Cameron was a formidable opponent of the Reform Party, and aided 
in forming the Liberal-Conservative Association of Toronto; became its 



22 


Biographical No/zees. 


first president, and held that office until his elevation to the Bench. He 
was also vice-president of the Liberal-Conservative Convention which was 
assembled in Toronto, September 23rd, 1874. He was one of the promoters 
and became a Director of the Dominion Telegraph Company, and also of 
the Confederation Life and the Isolated Risk and Insurance Companies, 
all of which proved successful enterprises, and have become permanent 
institutions. In religious views Chief Justice Cameron adheres to the 
Church of England, of which he is a member, and is also a member of the 
Caledonian and St. Andrew's Societies. On December 1st, 1851, he was 
married in Toronto, to Miss Charlotte Ross, daughter of 'Villiam Wedd. 
Esq., of Eriglish birth, who immediately prior to his death resided in 
Hamilton, Ontario. She died January 14th, 1868, leaving three sons and 
three daughters, who are all still living in Toronto. The eldest son is Dr. 
Irving Heward Cameron, a practising physician of this city. 


THOMAS CAMPTON is a native of Leicestershire, England, where he was 
born February 23rd, 1813. When eighteen years of age he joined the 68th 
Regiment, British army, and by good conduct attained the rank of 
sergeant. During his years of service, he spent some time at Gibraltar 
and Jamaica; and from the latter station he removed with his regiment to 
Canada. \Vhile here he obtained his discharge from the army, and at once 
came to Toronto, where he established himself in the grocery business. 
This was m 1842, and three years later he removed to Collingwood, then a 
new settlement, where was born to him a son; the first white child there. 
In 1850 he returned to Toronto, where he engaged in the meat business, 
from which he retired in 1881, and has since lived in private life. 


FREDERICK CHASE CAPRÉOL. The name of this gentleman, one of 
the oldest residents of Toronto, connected as it is with the organization. and 
carrying out of the first railroad constructed in the Province, certainly 
deserves a prominent place in our pages. Mr. Capréol was born loth 
June, 1803, and is the second son of Thomas Capréol, Esq., of Bishop 
Stortford, Hertfordshire, England. His pedigree on his father's side is 
derived from the ancient and ennobled foreign family of the De Capréols, 
and on his mother's sidè equally illustrious, as she was niece to the late 
Sir- Richard Chase, and a relative by marriage of the late-Marquis of Salis- 
bury. Mr. Capréol first came to Canada in 1829 to assisf in arranging 
the affairs of the old North-West Fur Company, and having fulfilled his 
part of the business returned to England in 183 I. Two years afterwards 
he agam came to Canada, and shortly after his arrival in New York, 



City of Toronto. 


23 


married a l\liss Skyring, a lady who had been a fellow-passenger with him 
across the Atlantic. He proceeded to Toronto and determined to settle 
here, having purchased a large quantity of land at Port Credit. The 
result of this purchase was a long and tedious lawsuit, in which he was, 
however, successful. For some time he followed mercantile pursuits, but 
these he gave up when he conceived the idea of promoting the Northern 
Railway. It is a well-known fact that to Mr. Capréol the Northern 
Railway owes its existence, as it was he who projected it, and promoted 
the design, almost unaided, and at his own expense forwarded the pre- 
liminary arrangements. Noone can fully estimate the benefits which the 
services of this gentleman in this respect conferred on Toronto and the 
country north of it. After the completion of the railway Mr. Capréol 
proceeded to Europe with his family and travelled on the continent, and 
whilst in London had the gratification of being presented with a handsome 
service of plate, given to him on behalf of the citizens of Toronto as a mark 
of .their confidence, esteem and gratitude for the services which he had 
rendered to their city. Mr. Capréol was also the founder of the first \Vater 
and Gas \Vorks in the city, and was once a member of the City Council. 

1r. Capréol's name is also associated with a noble piece of gallantry, which 
reflects not a little credit on his public spirit. In the month of July, 1843, 
a gentleman of the name of Thomas Kinnear, residing at Richmond Hill, a 
much esteemed citizen, together with his housekeeper, were brutally and 
barbarously murdered during the same day by two of his servants, who after 
the cold-blooded deed escaped to the United States. The city authorities 
would not take any action in the matter, and Mr. Capréol, hearing of the 
whereabouts of the murderers, chartered a steamboat, at twelve o'clock on 
Sunday night, and at a considerable sacrifice of time and money proceeded 
to Lewiston, where he succeeded in cap"turing the fugitives, and brought. 
them to Toronto. They were tried, found guilty, one of them suffered the 
extreme penalty of the law, and the other, Grace Marks, was senteuced to 
the Penitentiary for life. A full account of this '\:ragedy will be found in 
Chapter IV., page 32, of the History of the County of York, embodied 
in this work. Mr. Capréol on his return from the continent obtained 
a charter incorporating the Huron and Ontario Ship Canal Company, 
having for its object the building of a canal between Lakes Huron and 
Ontario to connect and improve Canada's great water highway. H 
indomitable energy and pluck in endeavouring to secure the completion 0__ 
this great work is well known to most of our citizens. Mr. Capréol has 
brought up a large family, three sons and eight daughters. His eldest son, 
J. Lonsdale Capréol, is Clerk of the Executive Council of Ontario. His 



24 


Biographical Notices. 


second son, Frederick E:hase, is in the Department of the Interior, Ottawa. 
His third son, Alfred Reginald, is in the Imperial Bank. Of his daughters, 
only one is married, she is the wife of F. O. Cross, Esq., Manager of the 
Canadian Bank of Commerce at Woodstock. 


REV. JOHN CARRROLL, D.D., was born on Saltkill Island, Passama- 
quoddy Bay, New Brunswick, on August 8th, 1809, being one of twin sons. 
He is the son of Joseph and Mary (Ridout) Carroll. In 1809 the family left 
New Brunswick, and after residing at Maford, Ten 1\lile Creek, Fairchild's 
Creek and Grand River, settled in York at the close of the \Var of 1812. 
Their first habitation was a share of Artilleryman Elder's hut on the west 
shore of the bay, an edifice which fully eighty years ago tumbled into the 
water. They next occupied a house at the corner of Duke and George 
Streets. As Joseph Carroll was a saddler and harness maker by trade he 
subsequently removed to the corner of Duchess and George Streets, where 
he opened the regimental harness shop of the loth Regiment. John Carroll 
acquired an education at various York primary schools, and received a 
classical training at a higher school. He then commenced teaching, from 
which occupation he was called by the authorities of the l\Iethodist 
Church to become a circuit preacher. He ultimately entered the regular 
ministry at the Conference of 1829, and continued his duties until 1870, 
when he was superannuated. During an active ministerial career of forty- 
two years, Dr. Carroll has been stationed at the leading cities and towns in 
the Province, among those being London. Hamilton, Ottawa, St. Catharines, 
Belleville, Prescott and Cobourg. While at the latter place he taught for a 
year at Victoria College, and attended classes in Greek, Hebrew and Phil- 
osophy. For twenty-five years .he had charge of districts over some of 
which he travelled. In 1874 he received the degree of D.D. from the North 
Carolina State University. Since his superannuation Dr. Carroll has 
spent his time writing books, chiefly of a religious character. Among them 
are" Case and His Cont
mporaries, a History of Methodism in Canada," 
"Life of Father Carson," "Methodist Baptism," " Exposition Expounded, 
Defended and Supplemented." He died ät his residence in Toronto after 
a brief illness, December 13th, 1884, and was buried at St. Catharines. 


ROBERT CARROLL, of Carroll & Dunspaugh. His father was born in 
the north of Ireland, where he acquired the building business with his 
father, who was a Government contractor for many years. He continued 
with him until he emigrated to Canada in the year 1831, and followed the 
same line of business in the City of Toronto until his death in the year 1868. 



Czty of Toronto. 


. 25 


His wife, Mary McCallen, was born in the same place. She was the daughter 
of a farmer, who was of Scotch descent, who now lives on Ontario Street, aged 
seventy-seven years. On leaving the Old Country they had one daughter, 
who died on the voyage out. \Vhile in York he had three sons, James. 
Matthew and Robert. James died in Lockport, N. Y., to which place his par- 
ents moved from Canada, they lived there for six years, during which time 
three daughters were born, l\Iary Jane, Anne and Alvarina, the latter died 
in Buffalo, whither her parents had moved, after ten months trial of Pitts- 
burgh, and where they resided over two years. They returned to Toronto in 
1845, and made it their home for life, where another son was born, 
James ,V. (1845), who married Sarah lvlorrison, sister of James Morrison. 
brassfounder, Adelaide Street 'Vest. He went to \Vinnipeg, where he 
now resides with his wife and one son, having lost three daughters in 
Toronto. Matthew married in Toronto and made his home in New York, 
U. S., and died there in 1869, leaving a wife, son, and one daughter, 
who now resides in Toronto. Mary lane married J. Segsworth, wholesale 
jeweller and importer, \Vellington Street East, near Yonge, son of John 
Segsworth, an old pioneer who emigrated from Yorkshire, England, to. 
Little York in the year 1831, and who carried on a successful business as 
waggon-maker on Richmond Street \Vest, from which he retired on 
a competency, and died in the old homestead in 1871. Mary Jane is now 
the mother of eleven children, ten of whom are now living with her and her 
husband at 137 Church Street. Anne was married to Mr. D. J. Bradley, 
from Yorkshire, England, engaged in the dry-goods line; she had seven 
children, four of whom are. now alive, one son and three daughters. 
Robert, the subject of this sketch, was educated at the old Model School, 
which stood on a site of the residence of the present Lieutenant-Governor. 
He learned the building business with the firm of l\'Íetcalf, \Vilson & 
Forbes, during which time they had the contract for St. James' Cathedral, 
Trinity College, Normal School, and the old Post Office, on the west side 
of Toronto Street. After his apprenticeship he commenced business as 
builder and contractor. He married Catharine Jamieson on 15th Decem- 
ber, 1864, daughter of 'Vm. Jamieson, lumber merchant, one of the old 
pioneers from Ayrshire, Scotland, who arrived in Little York in 1831 and 
died in 1875, by whom he had six daughters. Three are now alive: the 
eldest, Catharine Marion, Hamilton; second, l\'Íary Louise; the youngest, 
Elma Burns. Their mother died April 18th, 1883. He continued in the 
same business until he formed a partnership in the year 1868 with his 
brother-in-law, W. M. Jamieson, in builders' supplies. The latter was a 
prominent Mason and York Pioneer, having come to Canada with his father 



26 


Biographical Notices. 


when seven years old. He continued this business until the death ofW. M. 
Jamieson in 1877, after which time W. F. Dunspaugh took his place (1879) 
in which he, W. F., continued until he effected another partnership with 
Francy, on the Ohio River, U. S., for the manufacturing of sewer pipes, 
which firm is known as the Great Western Fire Clay Company, Toronto, 
Jefferson County, Ohio, U. S. His father, \V. H. Dunspaugh, took his 
place in the old firm 1882, which now stands Carroll & Dunspaugh, dealers 
in and importers of sewer pipe and general builders' supplies, 66 Adelaide 
Street West. 


JOHN JOSEPH CASSIDY, M.D., was born in Toronto, of Irish parents, in 
1843. He received his early education at a private school, and also at a 
school taught by the Christian Brothers. At the age of eleven years he 
was sent to' St. Michael's College, Toronto, where he remained six years, 
afterwards spending three years at Ste. Anne de la Pocatiere, Province of 
Quebec. In 1864 he matriculated in medicine in Toronto University, grad- 
uating as l\1.B. in 1868, and as :M.D. in 1869. At the examination for 
M.B. he carried off the Star gold medal for Anatomy. Be began the practice 
of medicine in this city in 1868, and has now accumulated a large and 
prosperous patronage. In 1868 he was appointed physician to the House 
of Providence, Toronto, and he remained the sole medical attendant of that 
institution for seven years. In 1869 he was appointed a member of the 
visiting staff of the Toronto General Hospital, a position which he main- 
tained until 1884, when he was transferred to the consulting staff. . He is 
a member of the Provincial Board of Health of Ontario, being the commit- 
te
 on "the heating and ventilation of buildings," and a member of the 
committee on "publication." Dr. Cassidy married, in 1878, Miss A. A. 
'Messner, of Formosa, Bruce County, Onto He is a Catholic. . 


THE CAWTHRA F AMILY.-In the beginning of the present century 
Joseph Cawthra came from England to America and settled on a grant of 
land still m the possession of his descendants near Port Credit, where, 
among the Indians, the name" Etobekous" was given him and his family, 
from the number of elder trees on the shore; Etobicoke being the 
Indian name fQr elder tree. Mr. Cawthra's enterprise soon brought him to 
Toronto, then called York, where he opened the first wholesale business 
established there, and where for many years he was a pro
inent citizen, 
and died at an advanced age in 1842. His widow survived him and died 
at the age of eighty-six, in Toronto, in 1847. Their second son, John 
Cawthra, served his country in the War of 1812 ; he was with General Brock 



City of Toronto. 


27 


at the capture of Detroit, and at Queenston. He settled at Newmarket, 
and represented the -County of Simcoe in the Parliament of Upper .Canada 
as its first member, on its separation from the County of York. He died at 
Newmarket Ïn 1851, leaving three sons and one daughter. \Villiam Cawthra, 
the youngest son of Joseph Cawthra, was for many years a well-known 
citizen of Toronto. After his education, first in the early school of Arch- 
deacon Stuart. and afterwards at :ì\Iontreal, he remained with his father in 
business in Toronto, and though he took an active and prominent part in 
the stirring political events of those early days, he never entered Parlia- 
ment, although often solicited by his party and friends to do so. He 
married Sarah Ellen, daughter of the-late J. Crowther, -who survives him. 
He died at Toronto in 1880, in the seventy-ninth year of his age. 


JAMES CHAMBERLIN, hotel-keeper, Toronto, was born in this city in 
1847. His father, Erial Chamberlin, was born in Albany in 1793, and at 
the close of the War of 1812 removed to Canada and located on land about 
fourteen miles out of Y onge Street, where he lived until his death. His 
mother was Mary Fulton, who was born in Richmond Hill. Her father 
was Colonel James Fulton, who fought in the \\Tar of 1812 and who died of 
cholera at Little York. While the custodian of some valuable despatches, 
he was taken prisoner a( Niagara by some Americans, but managed to get 
away from them; he was followed to an hotel which was surrounded all 
night by a guard, and in the morning was again taken prisoner, but again 
effected his escape. Mr. Chamberlin's maternal grandmother was a Mun- 
shaw, the first family to settle upon a farm on Y onge Street. The 
Munshaws came to Little York from Pennsylvania in an ox-cart by way 
of Hamilton. Mr. Chamberlin has been in the hotel business for about 
four years and is married to a daughter of vVilliam Funston, of this city. 
His brother Charles, a builder, lives at 450 Parliament Street. When the 
Munshaw family landed in Little York, one log building used for a custom- 
house was all the signs of civilization to be seen. 


COLONEL \VILLIAM CHEWETT was born in London, England, 21st 
December, 1752. In early life he was educated with a view of entering 
the East India Company's service, and at the age of eighteen years passed 
his examination and received an appointment as engineer and hydro- 
grapher, with orders to sail for the East. Unfortunately he was attacked 
with small-pox shortly before the departure of the vessel to which he was 
appointed, and was left in England. On his recovery he decided upon 
going to America, and sailed for Quebec in 1771. He very soon 



28 


Biographical Notices. 


received full employment from the Government in surveying, making charts 
and maps of the rivers and country in the neighbóurhood. When the 
American Revolutionary War, which broke out in 1775, extended to Lake 
Champlain and the vicinity of Quebec, 11r. Chewett served in the Quebec 
Militia, and in the course of the siege, when off duty, assisted in the 
engineers' department. After the defeat of the Americans he was appointed 
acting pay-master of works to the Engineers', Quartermaster's and Naval 
Departments for the Ports of St. John, Isle aux Noix, and their depen- 
dencies on Lake Champlain, in which office he remained until 1785. In 
1786 he took charge of the District of Lunenburg, formerly called the East. 
ern District of Upper Canada, and now comprising the easternmost counties 
of Ontario, and there surveyed land and located the disbanded troops and 
loyalists. It was while there engaged that he met and afterwards married. 
in 1791, a Scottish lady (Isabella) the daughter of Major Archibald Mac- 
donnell, of the Long Sault, whose family left Scotland on account of their 
active and rebellious support of the cause of the Pretender. In 1792 he was 
employed, under Governor Simcoe at Kingston, in reconstructing the map 
of the Province by dividing it into new Districts and Counties, previous to 
its being separatçd into Upper and Lower C
nada. In 1796 he accom- 
panied Governor Simcoe to Newark (Niagara) which was the temporary 
seat of Government till removed to Toronto, where he was employed in 
surveying and preparing buildings for its - reception. He also about this 
time (1779) commenced the erection of a house for his own use, which he 
afterwards occupied until his death, and which is still standing (1885) 
somewhat modified by an additional storey. In 1802, upon the retirement 
of Mr. Surveyor-General Smith, he was appointed Deputy Surveyor- 
General, conjointly with Mr. Ridout, who afterwards received the appoint- 
ment of Surveyor-General. During the American \Var of 1812-14 he was 
in command of the 3rd Regiment of York Militia and in the battle of York, 
27th April, 1813, he was, in the absence of lYIajor General Sheaffe, in com- 
mand of the forces; and when the townspeople capitulated to the greatly 
superior numbers of the Americans, he, with Major Allen, arranged the 
terms for the surrender of the town. In the engagement, while riding with 
Captain Loring, of the 104th Regiment, he was severely injured by the 
explosion of the powder magazine which caused so great a loss of life among 
the American troops. After the war he continued to serve the Government 
until 1832, when he was allowed to retire on full pay after a service 
in numerous departments for upwards of fifty-eight years. Colonel 
Chewett died in Toronto on 19th September, 1849, at the advanced age of 
ninety-seven years. 



City of Toro1lto. 


29 


JAMES GRANT CHEWETT, eldest son of Colonel Chewett, was born 9 th 
November, 1793, at Cornwall. In early life he was educated at the then 
historical school, in that town, kept by the late Bishop Strachan; he after. 
wards was engaged in the surveys which his father superintended, and for 
thirty years he was employed by the Government in what was then known 
as the Surveyor-General's Department. He ultimately became Deputy 
Surveyor-General of the Upper Province, and retired with a pension when 
the seat of Government was removed to Kingston. During the War of 1812 
he served in his father's regiment, and actively assisted in blowing up the 
powder magazine. In 1826 Mr. Chewett married, at Toronto, Martha 
Smith, second daughter of Richard Robison, who was of Scottish descent 
and born in L'Assomption, 1780, and afterwards settled at Napanee, where 
he formed ,a business partnership with Mr. Cartwright. In 1832 Mr. 
Chewett commenced on his propprty, at the corner of King and York 
Streets, a block of buildings. afterwards known by his name, one of which 
formed in those days a large and commodious hotel, kept by a Mr. Keating 
under the name of the British Coffee House. In 1835, as one of the City 
Fathers and Chairman of the Finance Committee, he arranged the system of 
one and two dollar debentures redeemable in one year with interest, and 
which then passed current in Canada as money. The few still outstanding 
are greatly prized by the curious. After Mr. Chewett's retirement from 
public life he took an active part in the management of the Bank of Upper 
Canada, of which he was many years the Vice-President. From that estab- 
lishment he passed to the Presidency of the Bank of Toconto when that 
institution was organized, and remained in office until his death, which 
occurred suddenly on 7th December, 1862. l\Ir. Chewett's kindliness of 
disposition and gentlemanly manners made him a universal favourite. He 
was thoroughly acquainted with the country in which he was born and 
brought up, and to the close of his life took an active and intelligent interest 
in everything which transpired. Mr. Chewett left issue two sons and a 
daughter; the eldest, Dr. \Villiam C. Chewett, was born in Toronto, 16th 
August, 1828, was educated at the Upper Canada College, and afterwards 
took the degree of Doctor of Medicine at the University of Toronto in 18 5 1 , 
the first regular student of that institution upon whom the degree had been 
conferred. Dr. Chewett never practised his profession, but turned his 
attention to other pursuits. He married, in 1857, Maria Susan, second 
daughter of Henry Ranney, Esq., an English gentleman now d
ceased, who 
settled many years ago in Ohio. Dr. Chewett, with his family, now owns 
the entire stock of the Rossin House Hotel Company; the land on whi
h 
the hotel stands being in the family since the original grant from the Crown. 



3 0 


Biographical Notices. 


GEORGE CHEYNE is a native of Tyrone, Ireland, and came to Canada 
in 1830. On his arrival he bought one hundred acres ofland in the County 
of Peel, and at once proceeded to farm it, having in early life been brought 
up to that occupation. He remained here about thirty years, and after 
spending ten years in Orangeville he came to Toronto, where he has since 
resided. He married in 1831 Miss \Valker, daughter of Robert Walker, of 
Toronto Township, by whom he had a family of six sons and three daughters; 
three sons and three daughters are living. Mr. Cheyne is a Conservative 
in politics, and in religion belongs to the Canada Methodist Church. 


ALEXANDER CHISHOLM, deceased, was born at Cromarty, on the High- 
lands of Scotland. He came to Canada with his parents; his father settled 
at Kingston, and served during the \Var of r812, and subsequently died at 
Owen Sound. Alexander settled at York in 1848, where he was married, 
by the late Dean Grasett, to a daughter of Lawrence Burns. He soon 
afterwards engaged in the grocery and dry-goods trade, for several years. 
He was also manager for Isaac Gilmore and R. A. Hoskins; but owing to 
failing health he retired from business. He was a member of Holy Trinity 
Church for many years; at his death he left a family of one son and three 
dau,S"hters: Catharine, married Philip Dwyer, of Troy, N.Y.; Alicia, 
married \Villiam Keiting, of Portsmouth, England. The third daughter 
married Walter Page, a grocer, of Y orkville. 


JOHN C. CLAPP, l'vLD., M.C.P.S.O., was born in New York, U.S., and is 
the son of James' A. Clapp, a mechanic and farmer, who resided in Seneca 
COl.!nty, N.Y. Mr. Clapp, sen'r, was a native of Connecticut, and descended 
from a family whose ancestry is traceable as far back as the eleventh 
century. In the year 1017. one Osgod Clapp, a Danish noble, settled in 
England, and was attached to the Court of Canute. For services rendered 
in the council and war he became possessed of certain lands at Sa1combe, 
in Devonshire, which are still in the hands of the family, and on which at the 
present time still stands, an old ancestral piie. In 1830 Ebenezer Clapp, 
lineal descendant of Osgod Clapp, settled in Massachusetts, U.S., and was 
for many years a printer of the Hampshire (Mass.), Gazette, and was the 
progenitor of his race on this side of the Atlantic. The subject of our 
sketch studied his profession at Cincinnati, Ohio, and afterwards engaged 
in practice in \Vestern New York. He came to Toronto in 1861, and since 
his advent has obtained a good share of patronage. 


THOMAS CLARK, son of \Villiam Clark, of \Vilton, near Pickering, Y ork- 
s
ire, England, was born in 1808, where he lived till the death of his father 



City of Toronto. 


3 1 


in 1829; his mother having died some months before. The following year 
he emigrated to Canada, and after living in what was then known as Little 
York about two years, he leased and iived on a farm in West York, where 
some two years later he married Eleanor, daughter of Francis and Mary 
Linton, natives of Alliston, near Pickering, England. In 1842 he bought 
and farmed lot 15, 2nd concession, East York; his wife died in February, 
18 44, leaving three sons and four daughters. In 1847 he married Nancy, 
daughter of James and Mary Miller, of East York, by whom he had two . 
sons and four daughters. He continued to reside on his farm till 1884, 
when he sold out and retired, and now lives at his residence, 93 Bleeker 
Street, Toronto. 
JOI-n
 A. CLINDINNING, boat-builder, was. born in Kingston, Ont., in 
1826, being the fifth in a family of six children. He was educated and 
brought up in Toronto, having come here with his parents in 1830. In 
18 49 he commenced keeping an hotel on what is now the Island, but what 
was then only a peninsular; he continued the hotel business, as well as 
boat-building, across the bay until the great storm of 1860, in which the 
waters of the lake washed completely over the peninsular. He then 
removed to the city, where he has been ever since. He has obtained the 
reputation of building some of the finest pleasure boats ever floated on 
Toronto Bay. 
ROBERT W. CLINDINNING, printer, was born in the North of Ireland 
in 1815. His father was David Clindinning, born in the County Mona- 
ghan, and a tailor by trade; his mother was a daughter of John Clark, 
Íarmer, of the same county. In 1819 his parents with their three children, 
Matilda, Robert and Emily, left Belfast, Ireland, and emigrated to Canada, 
where they settled at Gananoque, in Leeds County. l\ir. David Clindinning, 
sen'r, worked at his trade for six years, at the end of which he removed to 
Kingston, Ont., where he kept an hotel at the Market Square, called the. 
Hibernian Inn; while there his son John A. was born. In 1830 he removed 
to Little York, where he opened an hotel on Church Street, one door 
north of what is now the Publ\c Library. He afterwards removed to 
Rochester, N.Y., and subs'3quently to Kiantone, N.Y., where he died, May 
26th, 1856. His wife died in Toronto, January 30th, 1855. His third son, 
John A., was born in Kingston. Of his five children, the only living ones 
are Robert Wilson and John A. Robert .\V. Clindinning was educated at 
Kingston, and began to learn the trade of a printer on May 6th, 1831, in the 
office of the COltrier, a Conservative paper, published by George Gurnett, 
who became Mayor of Toronto in 1837; he was six years there. When 



3 2 


Biograpllical iVotices. 


that paper was discontinued he worked in the office of the Palladium, 
a moderate Conservative journal, published by Charles Fothergill; he was 
a year on that paper. Next he worked for a year on the Star, published by 
J. F. Cootes, and then in the Upper Canada Gazette, the Government 
office. From 1840 until 1843 he worked on the Church, a weekly journal, 
published by Henry Rowsell, and edited by Bishop Bethune, who was then 
Archdeacon; the Church was removed to Cobourg in 1843. It was in 18 43 
that the late Hon. George Brown came to Toronto and unfurled the Banner; 
only three or four printers were employed on that paper, and those who 
first set type in the office were John McLean, foreman, James Lumsden and 
our subject. In the following year the Banner was merged into the Globe, 
which was published in an office comprising two rooms, on the corner of 
Y onge and King Streets. It was printed on a hand press. I t was in the Banner 
that the article entitled" A Ministerial Crisis," written by Mr. Peter Brown, 
Hon. George Brown's father, and which favoured the Baldwin Govern- 
ment, appeared; the article changed the paper in a great measure. Mr. Clin- 
dinning worked on the Globe for three years, and then bought a printing office 
in N ew York, which he sold to Robert R. Smiley, the founder of the Hamilton 
Spectator. He spent another year on the Globe, after which he went on the 
British Colonist, a moderate Conservative journal, published by the late 
Hugh Scobie, on King Street. At Mr. Scobie's death in 1853, the paper was 
sold to 1\1r. Samuel Thompson, who continued it until 1860; Sheppard & 
Morrison then took charge of it; it was Sheppard who wrote the celebrated 
article" Whither are we Drifting?" In 1860 the copyright was sold to the 
Leader, on which paper Mr. Clindinning worked from 1860 until 1878; 
since the latter year he has been working in Dudley & Burns' book room. 
Mr. Clindinning has seen much that was exciting in the early days of To- 
ronto. He witnessed the execution of a York farmer who roasted his child, 
and that of Julia Murdock, the servant girl who poisoned with arsenic her 
mistress, the wife of John Roddy, merchant; he also saw the execution of 
Lount and Matthews, for participating in the Mackenzie Rebellion. Mr. 
Clindinning has been a strong Reformer. One of his sisters, Matilda, died 
of the cholera in 1834. 


NICHOLAS CLINKENBROOMER, deceased, was of German origin, being the 
son of a wealthy gentleman. When a young man he had every advantage 
of a good education, and on re
hing his majority he had acquired three 
languages, English, French and German. One evening when walking out 
in a sea-port town in his native country, he was taken by a press-gang with 
others, and hurried on board of an English ship of war and br,ought to 



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JOSEPH CLINKENBROOMER. 




City of Toronto. 


33 


Quebec, where he fought under Major-General Wolfe upon the Plains of 
Abraham, 1759; also participated in the battle of Bunker Hill, Boston, 
June 17th, 1795; and served at Saratoga under General Burgoyne, June 
17th, 1777, where the British forces were made prisoners of war to Ï\1:ajor- 
General Gates of the American army. After the close of the Revolution, 
he had the choice of being returned to his native country or of receiving a 
grant of. land in Upper Canada. He accepted the latter, and drew one 
hundred acres near Dundas, Ontario. He first took up his residence at 
Newark (now Niagara), where he worked for William Jones, an army tailor. 
One year later he engaged with the North-Western Fur Company, as an 
Indian trader. In 1795 he settled in York, on the corner of what is now 
Adelaide and Jarvis Streets, and began business on the present site of the 
Post Office, being the first tailor in York. On January 4th, 1799, there 
not being an English Church clergyman within eighteen miles of the place, 
he was married by John \Vilson, J.P., to Sarah \Vhite, the witnesses being 
John Clarke and Hugh McPhee. He died at York in 1807, leaving three 
sons, the eldest, Charles, born on Duchess Street in 1790. vVhen a mere 
boy he was bound out as an apprentice to Jordan Post, the first silversmith 
and watch-maker of York. After serving his apprenticeship he began busi- 
ness for himself on the south side of King Street, near Church, which he 
continued until 1870. He married Hannah, daughter of John Anderson, of 
Eglinton, by whom he left eight children. In politics he was a strong 
Reformer, and subscribed for the first copy of the Leader issued in Toronto. 
The Globe was a welcome visitor at his residence until his death. Although 
repeatedly solicited to accept municipal honours, he declined. Ï\1:any of 
the old families of York retain silverware and clocks made by his skilful 
hand, and although nearly a century old they show but little the effects of 
age. Charles Edward, 71 Major Street, eldest son of the above, was born 
in Toronto in 1841, and married Martha, daughter of John Campbell. 
Eliza, the fourth daughter, married John Alexander, a native of York, at 
whose residence, Baldwin Street, her father passed the remaining years of 
his life and died in 1881. Thomas, the youngest, married Sarah, daughter 
of John \Vright, of Parkdale. Joseph Clinkenbroomer, deceased, the 
second son of Nicholas and Sarah Clinkenbroomer, was born at York in 
1801. At the age of fourteen was bound out to James Ross, a tailor of 
York, with whom he served seven years. The price he received for making 
a suit of clothes was five dollars. He was twice married, first to Theresa, 
eldest daughter of Jonathan Hale; second t
 Ann Finck. He died Ï\1:ay 
24th, 1884, being the oldest nati ve- born resident of York, except one. Three 
sons, and one daughter survive him. William Henry, the eldest, was 
4 



34 


Biographical Notices. 


born in Toronto, 1834. At the age of fourteen he went to the Township of 
Vaughan and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner; when twenty-two 
years of age he married Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Donald Gilchrist, 
from the Island of Islay. In 1867, during the Fenian Raids, he served 
six months on the frontier at Fort Erie, in the Volunteer Corps, and 
under Major George D. Denison. Since that date he has been engaged in 
contracting and building. In early life he acquired the trade of blacksmith 
and is at present located at 667 Queen Street vVest. In 1866 he married 
Ann, daughter of John Sweetman. 
W. C. COOK was born in the parish of Houston, Norfolk, England, 
being the son of one vVarrener Cook. Our subject came to Canada in 
1818, and for one year followed boating on the Ottawa. He came to this 
city in 1830, and for some time was head wheelsman on a boat that traded 
between Kingston and Toronto and other ports. He next settled in King- 
ston, and opened a general store where he remained two years, subsequently 
returning to Toronto and purchasing some property on King Street. This 
was in 1830, and the price paid for sixty-six feet was $300. He also owned 
three vessels which traded on the lakes. Mr. Cook has been twice married, 
first to l\1:aria, daughter of James Ellis, a woollen draper of Nottingham- 
shire, England. His second wife was Eliza Cramp, who was a native of 
Kent. He has one son and two daughters living. Mr. Cook is a Reformer 
in politics, and in religion a member of the \Vesleyan Methodist Church. 
He is the eldest living ratepayer in St. David's \Vard, and has paid taxes 
since 1834' 
REUBEN COONS, real estate agent, was born in the Township of Matilda, 
County of Dundas, in 1825, being the third son of Jacob and Rebecca 
(Brady) Coons. Ï\1:r. Coons' father and grandfather were U .E. Loyalists, 
who served all through the American \Var of 1812. On his father's side 
his people came direct from Holland, his grandfather settled in the Town_ 
ship of Ï\1:atilda, County of Dundas, with his four sons. His father was 
engaged in farming until 1829, when he removed with his family to Pres- 
cott, where he died in 1882, aged ninety-five years. His grandfather died 
on his farm in the Township of Ï\1:atilda. Reuben Coons spent his school- 
days in Prescott, under the instruction of the Rev. Reuben Tupper, after 
which he began b!lsiness as a clerk, with his uncle Samuel Brady, who was 
in partnership with Mr. Horton, M.P. He kept a general store in Pres- 
cott. He remained there four years, and then went to work for a man 
named Alfred Jones. . In 1836 he went to Kingston with his brother 
Nicholas, who engaoged in the dry-goods business; he was clerk for him 



City of Toronto. 


35 


eight years. In June, 1844, he came to Toronto with his brother, who 
opened a dry-goods store on King Street, opposite Toronto Street. After 
three years he served Romain Bros., as clerk, for one year. He then spent 
a year in Hamilton and Brantford, and afterwards returned to Toronto, 
where he has been ever since. He worked for Peter Patterson; after that 
he entered the employ of the Grand Trunk Railway Company, he was there 
twelve years, furnishing supplies. to the railroad men. After that he went 
to \Villiam Burke, where he ran a planer four years, since which time he 
has acted in the capacity of a general agent, renting houses, etc. He is a 
member of the Queen Street Methodist Church, being a steward and 
treasurer of the poor fund of that church. In politics he is a Conservative. 
His first wife was Frances E., daughter of John Murchison; and his second 
wife Anne, daughter of James \Vatson. He has one daughter living. 
\V [LLIAM CORNER, deceased, was born in Yamaska, Province of Quebec, 
Canada, in 1831. He was the third son of Çharles Corner. In 1852 he 
became associated with the mechanical department of the Grand Trunk 
Railway as car foreman, which position he held until his death in 1884, 
being at that time the oldest employé on the road. In 1848 he married, in 
Montreal, a daughter of Robert Finley; he left five sons and five daughters. 
He belonged to the A.O.U.\V., from which his family received $2,000; he 
also belonged to the Royal Arcanum, from which his family received $3,000. 
He joined the Freemasons twenty-five years previous to his death, and 
continued a member of that fraternity. His son, John J., lives over the Don. 
GEORGE GILLESPIE CRAWFORD, Doctor of Medicine, was born in 1809, 
on St. Joseph's Island, where his father, Louis Crawford, a U. E. Loyalist 
in New York State, was in the employ of the Northern Land Company. 
His father afterwards went to England, where he died. His mother was 
Jessie Mitchell, daughter of Dr. Mitchell, of the 8th Regiment. Our subject 
being young when his father died, he was taken care of by his uncle's 
partner, George Gillespie, who had him educated at Bothwell. He after- 
wards took a course at Edinburgh University. He then became an appren- 
tice with Dr. Alexander Gillespie, with whom he served his time. In 1829 
he came to Canada and went to Penetanguishene, where he succeeded his 
uncle, Dr. David Mitchell, as surgeon in the 8th King's Own Regiment. 
In 1830 he settled permanently in Toronto, and began a business partner- 
ship with Newbigen & Co., as a sleeping partner. Dr. Crawford has been 
..twice married; first, to Marion Maitland in 1855; his second wife was 
Elizabeth, widow of James Sams (one of the English Cricketing Eleven) and 
daughter of Sergeant Hurley, Her Majesty's 81st Regiment. He has three 
daughters and two sons. 



3 6 


Bz.ographical N otias. 


COLONEL F. W. CUMBERLAND, deceased, was born at London, England 
September loth, 1820. After receiving a liBeral education he served severai 
years apprenticeship as an architect, and later entered the service of the 
Great \Vestern Railway Company, London, England. He subsequently 
filled a Government appointment in the Portsmouth dockyards, until 1848. 
One year later he came to Toronto, received the appointment of Engineer 
of the Home D
strict, and had charge of the York Roads from 1849. For a 
period of ten years,. he followed his profession of architect, during which 
time he designed St. James' Cathedral, the old Post Office, and the Normal 
School. In 1852 Mr. \V. G. Storm became a partner in his business, which 
continued for seven years, during which time they designed the University 
of Toronto, Osgoode Hall, and many other public and private buildings. 
During the great Exhibition held in London, England, he visited that city 
as one of the Canadian representatives of our Government. In 1859 he 
received the appointment of Chief Engineer of the Northern Railroad, the 
following year became Managing Director, which position he held until his 
death, 1881. Under his efficient management the road made great progress, 
and by many kind and generous acts, he greatly endeared himself to the 
officials and employés, and as a tribute to his memory, they erected, at Allen- 
dale, after his death, a bronze monument. In 1861 he organized a regiment 
of mechanics, called the loth Royals, of which he received a commission as 
Colonel. During the Fenian Raid in 1866: he largely assisted the staff by 
superintending the transportation of the troops. In 1865, he received 
the appointment of Provincial Aide-de-Camp, from which he retired in 
1868, receiving the thanks of Lord Dufferin. At the time of his death he 
was a member of the Masonic body, one of the Council of Trinity College, 
Vice-President of the Canadian Institute, and member of the St. George's 
Society, of which he was President in 1855 and 1856. He was also Presi- 
dent of the Mechanics' Institute. In politics he was a Conservative, and 
represented the District of Algoma in the Ontano Legislature for three 
years, and for one year occupied a seat in the House of Commons, during 
which time he was considered a man of quick perception, good judgment 
and a fluent speaker. He ever retained his. youthful spirit. At the time of 
his death he was President of the Toronto Cricket Club. His esteemed wife, 
\Vilmot Bramley, by whom he left a family of five children, one son and 
four daughters, survived him at the age of sixty-three. Barlow Cumberland 
was born at Portsmouth, England, 1849; came to Toronto the same year, 
where he was educated at the Grammar School, and subsequently at Chelten O - 
ham College, England; afterwards took a degree of M.A., at Trinity College, 
Toronto, entered Osgoode Hall and studied law, under Osler & Moss, 



City of Toronto. 


37 


until 1871, smce which time he has been General Passenger Agent for 
various railway and steamship lines. He has also held a captaincy of the 
loth Royals since 1874, and was elected PresIdent of the St. George's 
Society in 1883. 


PATRICK CUNNINGHAM (Old Fort) was born in Dublin, Ireland, 1842. 
He came to Canada at the time the Trent affair was likely to lead to 
war between Great Britain a
d the United States, with the 16th Foot, 
under the command of Colonel Peacock, and remained in Montreal about 
two years. In 1863 he came to Toronto and assisted in establishing the 
first military school in Canada. After handing it over to the 47th Regiment 
he did duty in several cities of \Vestern Canada, and also at the Thorold 
Instructive Çamp, all in connection with the service. In 1867 he gave up 
matters military, and entered the Railway Company's service for three 
years, part of which time he acted as conductor. A knowledge of carpen- 
tering gave him the opportunity of exercising his talents 111 that direction 
for ten years, and ever
 now he occasionally handles the tools of his trade. 
Mr. Cunningham has been a member of the Queen's Own for eleven years, 
ten of whic.h he has occupied the honourable position of Sergeant-Major. 
EDWARD DACK, boot and shoemaker, 73 King Street \Vest, was born 
in Stradbally, Queen's County, Ireland, in 1834. His father, l\Iatthew 
Dack, was a hardware merchànt, and emigrated to Canada with his family 
in 1834. He began a boot and shoe business in Kingston, and afterwards 
engaged in that line in Toronto, in the place now occupied by his son. He 
died in 1842. Since then the business has been carried on by his son, who 
does a large trade. In 1850 Edward Dack married Jane Nixon, by whom 
he had four sons and three daughters. He has one son in business in 
Toronto (E. Dack & Son), and one in the United States. Mr. Dack does 
not take a very active part in politics; he votes for principle rather than 
party. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and in his seventy- 
first year still continues hale and hearty. 


W. DARLINGTON, deceased, is a native of Shropshire, England, where 
he was born in 1814. He came out to Canada in 1849, and engaged in 
business as felt and gravel roofer, which he continued to conduct until his 
death, April 18th, 1881. He was the first to introduce the felt and gravel 
roofing business in this country, and being a man of energy ability, and 
steady habits, he amassed considerable property. His wife's maiden name 
was Frances Burton; she was from England also. 1\1r. Darlington was a 
member of the Toronto Hunt and Gun Clubs, and, being a splendid rider 



3 8 


Biog-raphical Notz"ces. 


as well as a capital shot, added in no small degree to the reputation 
enjoyed by the respective clubs. He was a Reformer in politics, and a 
member for upwards of twenty years of the Richmond Street Methodist 
Church. At his death he left one son, named W. H. Darlington, who 
is engaged in job printing; he resides at 6J! Mutual Street. 


JOHN DAVIS is a native of Staffordshire, England, and came to Canada 
in 1880. Three years later he accepted his present position as caretaker of 
the Toronto Medical School. 


SAMUEL H. DEFRIES was born in Toronto, being the son ot Robert 
Defries, a native of Devonport, County of Devon, .England, who came to 
Little York, now Toronto, in r829. The latter was for thirty-six years 
Postmaster in the Legislative Assembly, and after Confederation occupied 
the same position in the House of Commons, till his death in 1871. He 
died at his residence on Old Mill Road, and was burie4 by the York Pio. 
neers, of which body he was a member. His wife was Susan, daughter of 
George K. Fealstead, from Tyrone, Ireland, by whom h
 had a family of six 
sons, viz.: Richard, Robert, George, Samuel, John and Mark; the last 
named was shot at Ridgeway, during the Fenian Raid of 1866, being at 
that time Corporal in NO.3 Company, Queen's Own Rifles. The subject 
of this sketch, Samuel H., at the age of fourteen went on a whaling voyage 
in the ship Navigator, of Edgartown, Mass.,. U. S., which occupation he 
followed seven years, then returned to Toronto, and has since been in the 
employ of the Grand Trunk Railway Company. In 1859, he married 
Sophia, daughter of George Ernest, of Toronto, by whom he has one 
child, a daughter. The only other surviving member of the family of 
Robert Defries is Richard, the eldest son. 


. 
JAMES ACLAND DE LA HOOKE, surgeon, is a native of Plymouth, 
Devonshire, England. He was born in 1814, -and studied his profession at 
the Hunterian Theatre of Anatomy, King's College, London University, and 
St. George's Hospital, of that city, and was granted his diploma by the 
Royal College of Surgeons, England, in the year 1837. Two years after 
this he came to Canada and settled in Weston, where he practised his pro- 
fession for many years. In 1870 he came to Toronto, where he now 
resides, "and still practises his profession. In 1872 he was appointed 
a coroner-for Toronto and County of York. Dr. De La Hook was in 1842 
gazetted Surgeon to the first Huron Regiment of Militia, and has been 
attached to various regiments in the Province. In 1879 he was promoted 
to the rank of Surgeon Major, and he at present occupies the position of 



City of Toronto. 


39 


Senior Surgeon Major in the Dominion. Dr. De La Hook has twice 
married, first to Miss Sarah England, who died at Weston in 1846. His 
second union was with Miss Maria Louisa Denison. He has three sons liv- 
ing, James Acland, E. Dillon A., and T. D. Auley. 
CHARLES LESLIE DENISON, Dufferin Street, was born in York in 1841, 
his father being George Taylor Denison. He is the youngest child by 
his father's third wife. He has been engaged in farming nearly all his life, 
and now owns property in Toronto. He has been a member of the York 
Township Council. In 1859 he was commissioned a Cornet in the Gover- 
nor-General's Body Guard and received a lieutenant's commission in 
1861, but is now on the retired list. In 1882 he married a daughter of the 
late E. C. Fisher. 
E. P. DENISON was born in Weston in 1835, his father being Thomas 
John Denison, a farmer. He spent his early life in Weston, farming and 
store-.keeping. In 1878 he removed to Toronto. He is now, and has been 
for twelve years, connected with the Governor-General's Body Guard, in 
which he holds the rank of Captain. In Nov., 1882, he married a daughter 
of Ï\1:ajor John Paul, of \Veston. 
CAPTAIN JAMES DICK is a native of Argyleshire, Scotland, and was born 
in 1826. At the age of sixteen he began life as a sailor before the mast in 
the merchant service. He came to Canada in 1838, and took up his 
residence in Toronto, and in 1839, in conjunction with his brother, Thomas 
Dick, commenced sailing on the lakes, an occupation which they success- 
fully followed for many years. His connection with the different lines of 
steamers which operated in the early days was large and varied, and we 
ought not to omit to mention that Captain Dick, in company with several 
other inflential celebrities, ran the first steamer on the north shore of Lake 
Superior. This was in 1858. The same combination has the" Mail" con- 
tract from Collingwood to Fort Garry, and we may incidentally notice that 
one letter and two newspapers occupied the bag on the first trip, in 1858. 


JAMES ISAAC DICKEY was born in Belfast, Ireland, and came to Toronto 
in 1847. He sailed in company with his brother, the remainder of the 
family coming the year after. Both parents have died since their arrival. 
James was a machinist by trade, and for a year worked in this city for Mr. 
Spencer, whose establishment was on Yonge Street. He subsequently 
obtained a situation as Mechanical Superintendent at the Susquehanna 
Depot of the New York and Erie Railway. In 1852 he returned to Tor- 
onto and, in company with his brother and brother-in-law, purchased a lot 



40 


Biographical Notices. 


on Beverley Street, on which they built and established the Soho Foundry 
and steam engine works. This business was conducted with success until 
18 7 6 , when James and Nathaniel Dickey retired, leaving the business to Mr. 
Neil, their brother-in-law, who conducted it as Neil & Son. At Mr. Neil's 
death, in 1879, the business was closed. Mr. Dickey took an active interest 
in the formation of the loth Royals Regiment. 
JOHN DILL, painter, was born on Bay Street, Little York, in r833. 
His father was Alexander Dill and came to Canada from the North of 
Ireland in 1827. In 1828 he married Jane, daughter of Robert McCormick, 
by whom he had the following children: Sarah, married James Hughes, 
Toronto; Margaret, married J. Ashfield, Toronto; William, lives in New 
Orleans, La.; Mary Ann, married Alfred Booth, Toronto; Robert, lives 
in Toronto; Jane, lives in Cleveland, 0.; Elizabeth, a widow, lives in 
Toronto. Alexander Dill worked in George Ketchum's tannery, corner 
of Yonge and Queen Streets, for twelve years; - then he was employed 
in the Sheriff's Office and in the Police Office, until his death in 0 185 1. 
He served in the Rebellion of 1837-8. His father and mother came to 
Canada one year after he came out. John Dill was six years in the 
employ of A. R. Leonard, with whom he learned his trade. He afterwards 
started business for himself and has continued it ever since. In 1853 
he was married to Sarah Ann, only daughter of William Hughes. In 
politics he is a strong Conservative, and takes an active part in political 
matters. He sat at the Council Board, during 1876-7-8, as a representative 
of St. Patrick's \Vard. In religion he is a Presbyterian. Mr. Dill was 
connected wifh the Masonic Society, with the Orange Body and with the 
Irish Protestant Benevolent Association. 


JOHN DIXON, carriage manufacturer, wa
 born in Toronto, March 8th, 
18 37, and is the youngest of a family of five children, born to \Villiam and 
Elizabeth (Smith) Dixon, who came to Toronto from the State of New 
York in 1833. His father, who was a bricklayer by trade, was born in 
Lincolnshire, England; he was a Sergeant-Major during the Rebellion of 
1837-8, and served in Toronto, Kingston, Malaga, Chippewa, and partici- 
pated in the cutting loose of the Caroline. He died at the age of sixty-five 
years. Mr. Dixon's mother is still living, at the advanced age of ninety-one 
years. Of the five children three sons are living, two daughters being dead. 
Mr. Dixon learned his trade in Toronto, and now gives employment to about 
forty-five men. In 1862 he married Ellen, eldest daughter of William Hamp- 
son, who came from England and settled in Toronto some years ago. He 
was a builder and built Upper Canada College. .. 



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City of Toronto. 


4 1 


JAMES DOBSON, postmaster, Yorkville, is the eldest son of Matthew and 
Ann Park Dobson, his birthplace being ìVlohill, County of Leitrim, Ireland. 
He was born in 1810 and is now in his seventy-fifth year. His ancestry 
is traceable to the persetuted Huguenots who took refuge in England in 
the seventeenth century. His father served in the Leitrim :\lilitia, and 
was Quartermaster-Sergeant for nearly twenty years, receiving his discharge 
and a pension at the close of the French war. He came to Canada, and died 
here in his eighty-eighth year. \Vhen seventeen years of age, the subject of 
this memoir was bound an apprentice to Francis Irwin, Esq., architect and 
builder, of Carrick-on-Shannon, for seven years, and on completing his term 
came to Canada. This was in 1834. He did not reach Toronto until 
some time in the following year, having spent the winter in the older Prov- 
ince. He worked with the late George H. White, of Y orkville, for a 
season, afterwards removing to New York, where he remained till within a 
short time previous to the Rebellion of IR37 breaking out. On his return he 
settled in Y orkville, purchasing a house and lot a little south of the 
site of the Town Hall, and worked there at his trade. The Rebellion 
having commenced, he took up arms and joined a company of volunteers, 
under the captaincy of \Valter McKenzie, Esq., with John Hillyard 
Cameron, Esq., as Lieutenant. Mr. Dobson, like others of his countrymen, 
took up arms in defence of law and order, but when the affair was over and 
the passions and prejudices of the moment had subsided, he was compelled 
to admit in a great part, that something in the cause of the Rebels was not 
unmixed with justice. Our subject carried on the building trade until his 
marriage, in 184-0, to Sarah Ann, daughter of the late Captain Moore, of the 
Township of York, a veteran of 1812, who fought under General Brock, and 
was wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. The issue of the marriage 
was a family of eight children, two of whom died at an early age; three sons 
and three daughters are yet living: vVilliam Egerton, James Haines and 
Charles Albert; Sarah, Anne Eliza and Edith. During the early portion 
of Mr. Dobson's residence in Y orkviUe the population was small but 
steadily increasing, and' several brick manufactories were accumulating in 
the neighbourhood. The moral and religious welfare of this rising com- 
munity was, however, not all that could be desired, there being no schools 
and only a small frame church, built by the Primitive :vIethodists, but after- 
wards sold to the Wesleyan Methodists. Mr. Dobson gave up his house 
for reliaious services and Sabbath school while a church was being built, 
o 
and also took a deep and active interest in getting a school and temperance 
hall established. We may add that the present school-house and grounds 
are not inferior to any in the Province. In the year 1852, when Yorkville 
became incorporated, Mr. Dobson was one of the chief instruments in 



4 2 


Bzographical Notices. 


bringing about this desirable accomplishment, going into the matter with 
an energy and interest that could not fail to secure its object. At the first 
election the chosen were John Sleigh, butcher; John Severn, brewer; James 
Wallis, blacksmith; Thomas Atkinson, brickmaker, and James Dobson, 
builder, the latter being chosen first reeve of the new municipality. He 
remained a member of the Council seven years, and filled the chair on two 
occasions. Mr. Dobson retired from the building business in 1851, having 
got together a considerable amount of landed property. He opened a 
general store and was at this time appointed postmaster of Y orkville. In 
the year 1863 he was made a J.P. for the County of York; in 1868, Com- 
missioner of Affidavits in B. R.; in 1870 he was appointed agent for 
marriage lIcenses, all of which positions he at present holds. He is an 
office-bearer and trustee of the Bloor Street Methodist Church, Toronto 
In concluding our necessarily condensed record of Mr. Dobson's life and 
labours, we should say that both in public and private life he is recognized 
by all as a man of strict integrity and unblemished reputation. In con- 
nection with his public duties he is courteous, considerate and obliging, 
while in private life his hand is ever ready to relieve the needy, or he will 
give wholesome advice to those in misfortune. In politics Mr. Dobson's 
opinions are decidedly favourable to the Liberal cause, his ideas having 
undergone a complete change after the Rebellion of 1837. One other great 
motive in his life has been to promote the temperance cause, and it has ever 
been his consuming desire to see Prohibition the law throughout the land. 


JOHN WILLIAM DRUMMOND, deceased, was born in Little York, Septem- 
ber 2nd, 1817. His parents were John and Mary (Lbyd) Drummond, who 
came to Canada from Chester, England, in 18H. His mother died when 
he was an infant. After the death of his wife, John Drummond placed his 
children in the care of friends and relatives, and embarkèd upon a whaling 
expedition, from which he never returned. John William Drummond, was 
apprenticed to Jacques & Hay, furniture manufacturers, and at the age of 
twenty-one went to New York, where he remained .two years. In 1840 he 
returned to Toronto, and began the manufacture of furniture in partner- 
ship with his brother-in-law, John Haigh, who was succeeded on his death, 
in 1848, by James Thompson; in 1850 Mr. Thompson returned to Montreal, 
and then business was discontinued. Mr. Drummond then engaged in 
the lumbering business, Yonge Street, until July, 1868, when his stock being 
destroyed by fire, he decided to retire. On April 22nd, 1847, he marned 
Hester Ann, second daughter of John Doel, by whom he had five daughters. 
Mr. Drummond was elected to represent St. J ames' Ward in the City 

 




 
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City of Toronto. 


43 


Council in 1865, but resigned the honour at the end of a few months on 
account of ill-health. In 1877 he was commissioned a Justice of the Peace. 
For many years he was one of the Board of Directors of the House of 
Industry. He was a consistent member of the Methodist Church up to his 
death, which occurred September 9th, 1881. 


JOSEPH DUG<?AN is a native of this cIty, and a York Pioneer, having been 
born in 1832, and was a son of Thomas Duggan, a native of Ireland, who 
came to Canada in 1827, and died in Toronto in 1854. Mr. Joseph Duggan 
in 185 I commenced business at the corner of King and Princess Streets. In 
1872 he bought a farm on Kingston Road, on which he erected an hotel. 
This he carried on for two years, afterwards renting it, and built the beau- 
tiful homestead where he now resides, known as VV oodbiIJe Park. He 
subsequently built the hotel on the race track, called the Woodbine Park 
Club-house, which he occupied for four years; he then retired to the home- 
stead, which he has again rented, and is now living at 539 Church Street, 
Toronto. 


WILLIAM DUNCAN, deceased, was born in the County Donegal, Ireland, 
in 1780, and in 1825, came to Canada and located on lot 25, concession 3, 
East York, where he took up four hundred acres of uncleared land, half 
being in York, and half in )'Iarkham Townships. This he improved and 
cultivated and resided upon until his death, which occurred in 1865. He 
married Mary Fletcher, of Dublin, who died in 1813, leaving six children. 
He married again, Mrs. Lackie being his second wife, and by whom he 
had three children. The only living representative of the family by the 
first marriage is \Villiam Duncan, born in 1812. He lived upon the old 
homestead till 1867, when he retired from farming and removed to the city, 
where he still resides. He married in 1852, Margaret McGuire, of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, who died in 1858. 


JONATHAN DUNN, deceased, was born at Bridlington, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, in 1798, being the youngest son in a family of five children; his 
parents died when he was quite young. At the age of twenty-five he, in 
company with his brother, arrived in York, and began business at St. Law- 
rence Market as a butcher. \Vhen St. Patrick's Market was completed he 
removed to the latter place, where he continued the same business until a 
few years previous to his death, which occurred in 1864. During the 
Rebellion of 1837 he held a contract under the Government to furnish the 
supplies to the garrison. In 1843 he was elected to represent St. Patrick's 
\
/af(i in the City Council, which office he held until.1863, when he retired 



44 


Biographical Notices. 


from the deliberations of the council board. When eighteen years of ag
, 
he was stricken with a severe illness caused by over exertion; he then 
embraced religion, and ever after maintained his Christian character. 
\\Then the Queen Street Methodist Church was built, he was one of the 
board of trustees, and was a very active member until his death. As a 
member of the church he was ever true to her interests. A distinguishing 
feature of his life was his integrity in public or in private. As a man of 
business he fully maintained his character; his word was unquestioned; his 
honesty gained for him the esteem and respect of all, and at his death as an 
expression of sympathy and the respect in which he was held, many places 
of business in the city were closed. Mr. Dunn was twice married. His 
first wife was Anna Pickenny; she died soon after his arrival in New York. 
leaving three children, one son and two daughters; John Dunn, the eldest; 
Mrs. John Lee, Rochester, N.Y; Mrs. James Wallis, dead. His second 
marriage was to Jane, eldest daughter of John \\T allis, who .formerly kept 
the old Red Lion Hotel on Colborne Street; by her he had five sons and 
four daughters, as follows: Mary Jane, wife of \Villiam vVharin, 47 King 
Street \Vest; vVilliam, dead; James R., City \Veigh-master; NIrs. VV. L. 
vVilkinson; S. C. Dunn, farmer, in East York; vVallis, a farmer in Tor- 
onto Township; Jonathan, living in Detroit; Rosa, wife of \\T. C. Stratton, 
Inland Revenue Department; Lillie ì\L, wife of John Ritchie, 91 Kin,g 
Street vVest. James R. Dunn, third son of the above, was born in Toronto 
in 1839, at the old home on the Denison property., north side of Queen 
Street; received his early education in Toronto. He succeeded his father 
in business. In 1864 when :NIr. Jon..athan Dunn, sen'r, retired from 
the Council, he was chosen Alderman to represent St. Patrick's vVard, 
which office he held during 1864, 1865 and 1866. In 1874-'75 he repre- 
sented St. Andrew's \Vard, at the expiration of which time he received 
the appointment of City VV eigh-master, which office he now holds. He 
served as a volunteer in Colonel George T. Denison's Cavalry for three 
years. On December Isth, 1860, he married Frances, youngest daughter 
of Adam Rolph, of London, England. Our subject has been a Free- 
mason for many years, and was \Vorthy Master of Occident Lodge, 346, 
in 1883. He has been a member of the Odd-fellows for twenty years, and 
is also a member of the Ancient Order of United \Vorkmen. 


CHARLES DURAND, barrister. His ancestors were originally of French 
extraction. In about 1690 the Durands were among the Huguenots who 
settled in England and'were made citizens by patent in Queen Anne's reign. 
His great-grandfather 
as Charles Durand; the name Charles having been 



City of Toronto. 


45 


in the family for generations. His grandfather, Charles Durand, was an 
officer in the British army, and was stationed on the Welsh border where 
his son, the late Captain James Durand, the father of our subject, was born 
in 177 6 . His father came to Canada about the year 1800, and commenced 
business as a merchant in Montreal, where he remained several years. He 
then opened a store, and bought a large farm at Long Point, near Simcoe, 
Norfolk. In 1805 he bought and removed to a two-hundred acre farm 
which he had purchased in the then Village, now City, of Hamilton. His 
first wife, an English lady, was killed in 1805, while descending the then 
dangerous mountain pass at Hamilton; by her he had four children, viz. : 

Iaria, born 1798, and still living near Hamilton; James, Harriet and 
George, three of whom were born in England. In 1807 he married his 
second wife, a daughter of Hugh Morrison, a Revolutionary soldier, who 
fought under vVashington, by whom he had five children, as follows:- 
Henry, born in 1808; Charles, born in 181 I; Ferdinand, born in 1813; 
Alonzo, born in 1814; Ellen, born in 1816; all of whom are dead, except- 
ing Charles. During the \Var of 1812-'14 his father commanded a very 
large flank company of militia, and took an active part in the Battle of 
Queenston Heights, where General Brock was killed. In 1815 he removed 
to a point on the Bay of Quinté, and two years later returned to a farm 
near Hamilton. From 1814 to 1822, he was a member of the Upper 
Canada Legislature. In 1820 he bought a large farm, seven miles from 
Brantford, and remained there until near the time of his death in 1833. He 
was Registrar of the Counties of Halton and \Ventworth for about twenty 
years. His second wife died in 1828. Charles Durand, the subject of this 
sketch, was born in 1811, in Hamilton, and received his early education at 
Hamilton and Dundas. In 1829 he was articled to the late Robert Berrie, 
a Scotch barrister, at Hamilton, and in February, 1835, was admitted 
to practise as an attorney, and in February, 1836, was admitted as 
a barrister. He practised his profession in Hamilton until the end of 1837. 
After the troubles of 1837, he went to Buffalo, and thence to Chicago, prac- 
tising his profession in the latter city from 1839 until 1844, when he returned 
to Toronto, 
vhere he has ever since resided. In April, 1837, he married 
Sarah, a daughter of Lardner Bostwick, one of the pioneer settlers of Toronto, 
and one of its first aldermen. She at her death, in 1855, left six daughters, 
four of whom are married. In 1858 he married Mary AnD Bradshaw, a 
daughter of the late James Bradshaw, of Hamilton, belonging to a large and 
numerous family of U. E. Loyalists of the Niagara District, by whom he 
had six children, two sons and four daughters, four of whom are living; two 
daughters being dead. The subject of this sketch has been a practising 



4 6 


Biograpllical Notices. 


lawyer for over fifty years, and is still engaged in the practice of the law at 
his adv.anced age. He has also been a contributor to the political and 
literary periodicals in Canada since the year 1832, and owned and edited a 
paper of his own from 1851 to 1854, extensively circulated and devoted to 
temperance principles, literature and general news. 
lOHN EAGLE, retired, was born in the suburbs of London, England, in 
1820, and at the age of twenty-three came to Canada. He first settled in 
Brant County, taking up 200 acres of land, on which he lived and laboured 
nine years. At the end of this period it was taken from him by the 
Government, who desired it for the Indian Reserve, he receiving no compen- 
sation, after having devoted some of the best years of his life to its cultiv'a- 
tion. In 1853 he came to vVeston and rented a small hotel, wh
re he did 
business for some years. He afterwards bought the place, and erected 
near the site his large and commodious hotel, called the Eagle House, 
where he hved until 1884, retiring then from business and removing to this 
city. During his stay in Brant County Mr. Eagle underwent all the hard- 
ships and dangers incident to pioneer life, being frequently a mark for the 
Indian bullets, the latter looking upon the settlers as interlopers. Mr. 
Eagle for several years did an extensive business in \Veston as brick- 
maker, farmer and hotel proprietor, besides taking great interest in the 
construction of macadamized roads leading into the city. Mr. Eagle has 
been twice married. 


lAMES EDGAR, 1\1.D., was born in \Ventworth County in 1824; he entered 
the ministry of the late Primitive Methodist Church in 1846, and continued 
in service until 1880, when failing health compelled him to retire. He is 
now engaged in medical practice in this city. 
HUMPHREY ELLIOTT was born in the North of Ireland in 1831, where 
he remained until 1839, being the second son of Thomas Elliott, deceased, 
who first located at Ottawa on his arrival in Canada, where he stopped a 
short time, coming to Kingston and Toronto in 1840. The subject of this 
sketch learned the moulder's trade, which he worked at until 1855, when he 
engaged in boarding-house keeping. He located on the corner of Richmond 
and Victoria Streets, where he continued up to 1876. He afterwards retired 
and purchased some property on \Vellesley Street, where he erected two 
brick houses. He now owns Nos. 88,90 and 92. In 1854 he married Miss 
l\Iary McArthur. 
JOHN vV. ELLIOTT is a lineal descendant of John Elliott, who composed 
one of that now historical body, the" Pilgrim Fathers." He was born in 



CÜy of Toronto. 


47 


Leicester, Mass., September 7th, 1822, and in early life learned the dentistry 
profession, which he followed for many years in different cities before his 
arrival in Canada. He established himself in Toronto in 1858, where he 
has since remained, having gathered together a large practice. 


THOMAS \VILLIAM ELLIOTT, coal, wo{)d, flour and feed merchant, was 
born in the Township of York in 1840. -His father was Edward Elliott, who 
came to Canada in 1834 from England, and took up land in the Township of 
York, where he died at the age of slxty-seven years. His mother, Susannah 
Smith, was a daughter of \Villiam Smith, who fought under General Brock, 
and was killed at the Battle of Queenston Heights. Thomas \V. Elliott came 
to Toronto in 1867, and engaged in the coal, wood and feed business, to 
which he still adheres. In 1868 he was married to Ellen, fourth daughter 
of John Grey, a Scotchman, one of the oldest settlers in York County. In 
politics he is a Reformer; in religion belongs to the Methodist Church. 
Mr. Elliott is connected with the City Council; he was elected alderman for 
St. Matthew's \Vard last year, and re-elected in 1885. 


JOHN ELLIS, No. I Wood Lane, Yorkville, was born in Yorkshire, 
England, at a place called \Vhite Cross, on the 28th of March, 1810. Mr. 
Ellis was brought up on a farm. In 1831 he came to Canada with his wife, 
Rachael Johnson Ellis. \Vhen he first came to Toronto he went to work for 
the Hon. \Vm. Allen; afterwards rented a farm in York Township, where he 
was nine years engaged at farming, after which he returned to Y orkville, 
purchased property and built eight houses. In 1872 he retired. He is 
a Conservative and a member of the English Church. \Vhen he came to 
Y orkville the old Red Lion Hotel was the only building in the village. 


JOHN ELLIS, deceased, was born in Norwich, England, in 1795, and was 
an engraver by trade. In 1828 he married Rhoda, daughter of George 
Charles Bunting, by whom he had four children; two of them died in 
England. In 1836 he came to Canada, and, locating in Toronto, took up 
his residence on King Street, near Simcoe Street. He was engaged in 
business until 1868. In politics he was a Conservative, and in religion a 
member of the Church of England. He took a great interest in music, 
especially classical. At his death he left two children, a son and a daughter. 


REMELlUS ELMSLEY is of English extraction, his grandfather, John 
Elmsley, having emigrated from Yorkshire in the year 1795. He received 
his education in England, and was intended for the bar. His legal know- 
ledge, combined with administrative talents of a high order, secured for him 



4 8 


Biographical Notices. 


the position of Chief Justice of Upper Canada, which he filled for about 
five years. He was in the Upper House of the Legislature, and occupied 
the post of Speaker. He died in Montreal in I80S. He left a family of one 
son and two daughters. Our subject's father was born in 1801, and at the 
age of seventeen joined the Royal Navy, in which he served for a number 
of years, retiring in 1827 on half pay. He took up his residence in Canada 
about this time, and after a useful life died in 1863. Mr. R. Elmsley is the 
youngest son of the family. 


H. A. ENGELHARDT, Superintendent Mount Pleasant Cemetery, was 
born in Milhauson, Prussia, "in 1832. His father was Major Christopher 
Engelhardt; his mother's name was Damme; he was the only son. He 
received his education in the University College, Berlin, where he studied 
those subjects which would fit him for his profession of a civil engineer. 
He completed his studies when nineteen years of age. According to custom 
he spent two years in the sharp-shooters' guard, located in Berlin, and one 
year as volunteer; he served in Schleswig-Holstein. In I8S1 he came to 
America and located at Baltimore, where he became a landscape gardener; 
he spent a year assisting in the laying out of Central Park, New York. He 
lived in North Carolina and Virginia until 1870, when he came to Canada, 
where he has since been engaged in laying out public grounds and ceme- 
teries, including Government works; subsequently designing most of the 
recent cemeteries and public parks of Ontario. 


JOHN F ARR, deceased, was born in Hertfordshire, England, 1782, and 
settled in York, U. C., about the year 1815. He was by occupation a 
brewer, and was the pioneer of that business in this city, which he carried 
on for a number of years. His career was marked by that success which 
never fails to attend perseverance, integrity and straightforwardness of 
purpose, and in all business affairs he was highly respected. His death 
occurred in 1874, in the ninety-second year of his age. He married, in 
1821, Mary Bishop, a native of London, England, who died in 1882. 


JAMES FARRELL, retired, was born in the County of Derry in 1808. 
His parents were James and Margaret (Atkinson) Farrell; his mother died 
in Ireland. In 1831 he came to Canada, without a traåe and without 
money; but nothing daunted he got a horse and cart and went as carter, 
which he continued for fifteen years. He afterwards set up a grocery store 
in Queen Street West. Then he kept the General Brock Hotel. About 
twenty-five years ago he retired from business. Mr. Farrell served for two 



City of Toronto. 


49 


years In the cavalry. For four years he represented St. John's Ward in 
the City Council. He has two daughters, but no sons; one daughter is 
married to Charles Shields, of this city; and the other is married to Dr. 
Ross, of Thunder Bay. 


ARTHUR E. FISHER, music professor, was born in England in 1848, and # 
came to Canada in 1879, locating first in Montreal, where he was engaged 
as organist of St. George's Church nearly three years. He studied in Paris 
under the principal violinist of the Conservatoire of 1\1: usic, and at Trinity 
College, London, under Henry Holmes. I\1r. Fisher devotes himself chiefly 
to voice tuition and the theory of music (harmony and counterpoint), and 
has lately sent up a number of lady pupils to the examination at the 
University of Trinity College for the degree of music, the first instance of 
the kind in Canada. He is also the originator of the St. Cecilia Madrigal 
Society. 


EDWARD FISHER, organist and professor of music, 12 vVilton Crescent, 
was born in the United States and came to Canada in 1875. He first 
located in Ottawa, where he had charge of the musical department of the 
Ottawa Ladies' College. He studied the organ under Eugene Thayer, 
composition with Julius Eichberg, and piano with J. B. Sharland. Mr. 
Fisher resided in Burton during his studentship with these .masters, holding 
during this period various important positions in that city as organist and 
pianist. He finished his education at Berlin, Prussia, under the organist, 
Haupt, and the pianist and composer, Loeschhorn. Leaving Ottawa in 
18 79, he removed to Toronto, having accepted the position as organist of 
St. Andrew's Church, and a few months later formed the "St. Andrew's 
Choral Society," latterly known as the" Toronto Choral Society," number- 
ing now about three hundred active members and four hundred honorary 
members. :Mr. Fisher is also musical director for the Ontario Ladies' College 
at \Vhitby, and for the past year conductor of the" Guelph Choral Union." 
. 


ANDREW FLE:\IING was born in the County of Tyrone, Ireland, in 
1819, and in 1825 came to Canada with his father, John Fleming, who 
remained in Quebec until 1830. He moved to By town (now Ottawa) after- 
wards. Andrew is the eldest of the family living. After leaving school he- 
joined the volunteers during the Rebellion of 1837, and remained in the- 
City Guards for seven months afterwards. He subsequently joined the 
first troop of incorporated dragoons, and remained with them until their 
disbandment. In 1848 he received the appointment of Usher to the High 
Court of Queen's Bench, which position he still retains. He was tax col- 
5 



50 


Biographical Notices. 


lector for St. John's \Vard, twelve years. In 1841 he married Miss 1\lary 
Ann Boddy, daughter of Michael Boddy, by whom he had ten children, 
seven of whom are still living. He attends the English Church. 


JAMES FLEMING, seedsman and florist, Yonge Street, is a native of 
Aberdeen, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1834' He located in Montreal 
two years, and being a practical gardener and florist worked at his trade. 
.In 1836 he came to Toronto and commenced market gardening on three 
acres of land west of Y onge and Elm Streets; his present place being part 
of the original lot. In 1837 he erected a seed store and greenhouses for the 
sale of plants and seeds which has proved very prosperous as a business 
venture. In 1864 Mr. Fleming was commissioned a Justice of the Peace 
for the City of Toronto, and in 1884 received the same honour in connection 
with the county. In 1877 he was elected alderman for St. John's Ward, 
and has since been re
elected for three years. Mr. Fleming is a director 
of the Horticultural Society and the Industrial Association. In politics he 
is a Reformer, and in religion a Presbyterian. 


MCGREGOR FLIGHT, engineer and architectural- draughtsman, City 
Engineers' Office, is a native of Kingston-on-Thames, England, eldest son 
.of Thomas Flight, a retired captain of the Greensine Merchant Service. 
He came to Toronto in 1870. Mr. Flight was articled with Mr. T. Har- 
rington, marine engineer and surveyor, London. 


J. C. FORBES is the son of the late Duncan Forbes, builder. l\h. 
Forbes is a portrait painter by profession, and commenced the practice of 
his art in Toronto in 1866. In 1876 he exhibited at Philadelphia paintings 
entitled, "The Wreck of the Hibernia," and "Beware." He has taken 
portraits of Lord Dufferin, Sir John A. Macdonald, and many other prominent 
politicians. His paintings of scenes in the Rocky Mountains and in the 
forest are unexceptionally good. "The Grand Canyon of the Arkansas," 
"The Mount of the Holy Cross'
 and "Love Lilly" being especially 
admired. He received a medal for a portrait of his father at the Inter- 
national Exhibition, held in Buffalo, in 1871. He is a member of the 
Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, also the Ontario Society of Artists. 


JAMES FOSTER, optician and electric instrument maker, 13 King Street 
West, is the only child of Henry and lVlary (Andrews) Foster. Henry 
Foster was a bricklayer 
nd stonemason by trade, and came to Canada 
from Drumaulk, County Monaghan, Ireland, in 1828; he located in Toronto 
where he acquired some property on Duchess Street. James Foster 



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City of Toronto. 


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was born in Toronto in 1830, and was only eighteen months old when his 
father died at the age of thirty-six years; his mother died in 1877, aged 
eighty-seven years. He afterwards received a good educatio
, and when 
sixteen years old commenced to learn the trade of mathematical instrument 
maker. In 1864 he began business for himself on Adelaide Street, where 
he also did considerable work for the Montreal Telegraph Company, and 
for twenty years made all the instruments used by that company west of 
Kingston, employing a considerable staff of workmen. In 1873, finding his 
former stand too small for his business, he leased the building, No. 4 0 
Colborne Street, and fitted it up to suit his business, and having then suffi- 
cient room he began to manufacture surveying and engineering instruments. 
He remained there until the fall of 1883, when he removed to his present 
'Commodious stand, 13 King Street \Vest, where he now carries on the most 
extensive business in the optical and surveying instrument line in the city, 
and manufactures most of the meteorological and other instruments of 
precision, used in the Dominion, and is kept actively employed by an ever 
growing demand for his skill and instruments. Mr. Foster married Mary E. 
Jobbet, whose grandfather was paymaster in the famous Queen's Rangers. 


THOMAS Fox was born in the City of London, England, in 1812, and at 
the age of twenty he emigrated to Canada, and settled in York. He was 
for some time engaged in the manufacture of brick, subsequently erecting 
property on Curzon and Leslie Streets, and is now living retired. In 1834- 
he married Miss Mary Rose, of Devonshire, England, who died in 1854. 
He married a second time, Mary Rooney. By his former wife he had nine 
children, and by his present wife two cnildren. 


GARRETT F. FRANKLAND, a representatiye of a Saxon house, and one 
of the leading citizens of Toronto, was born in the Village of Barrowford, 
Lancashire, England, in 1834, and settled in Toronto in 1854. In early 
life he learned the trade of a butcher and grocer, in connection with 
farming. On his arrival in Toronto, he started as a butcher for the St. 
Lawrence Market. By energy and perseverance he gradually increased his 
business, and in 1860 he began to export meat to the U
ited States and 
Great Britain. This business, which has now assumed such gigantic 
proportions, Mr. Frankland was mainly instrumental in originating; the 
particulars connected with its rise and progress, together with statistical 
matter, will be found elsewhere in this ,volume and, therefore, needs no 
repetition. Vve may also add that Mr. Frankland has done this country the 
signal service of raising the price of cattle from $25 to $30 a head. He was 



52 


Biographical Notices. 


also the means of causing the Corporation of Liverpool to expend over 
$200,000 for the accommodation of live stock upon its arrival, thus relieving 
the suffering endured by the exposure to the twelve hours' quarantine 
imposed by the Imperial Government. As a recognition of his valuable 
services, Mr. Frankland was the recipient, in 1876, of a banquet and an 
illuminated address, presented at the \"1 alker House, here; also a clock, at 
the City Arms, and in 1879 of a service of silver platè, at Liverpool. Mr. 
Frankland was married, July 8th, 1857, to Jane Nelson, of Antrim 
County, Ireland, by whom he had a family of six children 


EDWARD GALLEY, 303 Parliament Street, is a native of the Isle of 
\Vight, and came to Toronto in 1852. In 1856 he married Mary Jane, 
daughter of the late Richard Jewell, of Toronto. He was for twenty-four 
years engaged in the contracting and building business, from which he 
retired in 1879. During his business career he erected many of the whole- 
sale stores and buildings on Front, \"1 ellington, Y onge and Bay Streets; also 
the Grand Opera House, ånd five churches, including the Sherbourne and 
Parliament Street Methodist Churches. In addition to public buildings, 
he has erected upwards of fifty private residences; altogether he has erected 
nearly one thousand buildings, upwards of forty of which he owns. He 
e'mployed at one time about five hundred hands. Mr. Galley has been a 
member of the Public School Board since 1873, and was two years chairman 
of that body. In 1878 he contested East Toronto for the Dominion House 
of Commons. He was elected member of the Toronto City Council for the 
\Vard of St. Thomas in 1885. Amongst other offices held by him may be 
mentioned a directorship in the Land Security Company, the North 
American Life Assurance Company and others. In religion he is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church. . 


THE GAMBLE FAMILY.-Nathaniel Allan Gamble, retired, 554 Church 
Street, Toronto, is of Scotch extraction, and was born on lot 90, Yonge 
Street, and is a grandson of Nathaniel Gamble, sen'r, who came from near 
the Town of Bowmore, in the Island of Isla, Argyleshire, Scotland. He 
settled in Canada in 1798, on lot 89, on the east side of Y onge Street; he 
was married to a daughter of Samuel Chambers, by whom he had three 
sons and two daughters, all of whom came with him. He was a Presby- 
terian, and for a long time was trustee of glebe land belonging to that 
Church, near Markham. ,He died.in 1833, leaving a large quantity of land 
in the Counties of York and Simcoe. Nathaniel Gamble, jun'r, youngest 
son of the above, was born in 1764' Settled :on lot 90, on Yonge Street 



CtÏy of Toronto. 


53 


which he cleared and farmed until his death in 1836. Like his father, he 
was an extensive landowner. He was identified with the municipality in 
which he. lived, and belonged to the Militia, in which he held the rank of 
Captain. In 1803 he married Susannah, daughter of Thomas Mercer, of 
York Mills. He belonged to the Churchpf England, and was a Conserva- 
tive in politics. He left the following children: Anne, James, Susannah, 
Mary, Thomas, Nathaniel Allan, George and Sarah, all of whom married 
and settled in the County of York, except Thomas. The eldest son. James 
Gamble, inherited his grandfather's farm, lot 89, and lived on it until his 
death in 1854. He was a commissioner in the Court of Request, before 
Qivision Courts were established; a magistrate, aI?-d also held a commis- 
sion in the l'vlilitia. Thomas Gamble, the second son of Nathaniel Gamble, 
jun'r, settled in the Township of Tecumseth, County of Simcoe, in 1838, 
where he cleared a large farm. He was a magistrate and held a commis- 
sion in the Militia as Captain. Nathaniel Allan Gamble, the third son of 
Nathaniel Gamble, jun'r, was born in 1817. He inherited his father's farm, 
lot 90, on Y onge Street, where he lived until 1859. In 1856 he was' com- 
missioned a Justice of the Peace; he also served as quartermaster in the 
12th Battalion of Volunteers. \Vhen he left his farm, he lived in New- 
market for some years, where he owned and managed a brewery. In 1872 
he moved to Toronto, and married a daughter of John Sproule (who kept a 
store, near the market, on King Street, Toronto, for many years before his 
death in 1849. George Gamble, the youngest son of Nathaniel Gamble, 
jun'r, was also an extensive farmer for many 
ears in t'he Township of 
King, near Lloydtown. He also married a daughter of John Sproule, of 
Toronto. He is now retired and living in Toronto. 


JOSEPH GIBSON, ornamental plasterer, was born in Lincolnshire, 
England, in 1823, being the only son of Joseph Gibson, shoemaker, and 
Martha Clue, daughter of Thomas Clue. His mother died in 1831, and in 
1833 he came to Canada with his father, who took up a farm in East 
Gwillimbury, and having cleared it, lived there until his death in 1864, 
aged sixty-four years. After coming to Canada he was married to Mrs. 
Hannah Philips, by whom he had a son and a daughter. \\Then eleven 
years of age, Joseph Gibson commenced to learn the plastering trade with 
his uncle, John Gibson, who had come out in 1830. He remained with him 
until he was twenty-three, when he married Anne, the eldest daughter of 
William Smith, by whom he had three sons and one daughter. In 1850 
Mr. Gibson started business for himself. He is a -Reformer. and a member 
of the English Church. 



54 


Biograplzz"cal Notices. 


COLONEL GIVINS, deceased, was born in the North of Ireland, about 
the year 1784. He was a relative of the Duke of Abercorn, and came out 
to Canada with Governor Hamilton, and afterwards joined Governor 
Simcoe at Bermuð.a, to whom he was Aide-de-Camp. He returned again 
to England and exchanged into the 5th Regiment, and again came out to 
Canada. He married, soon after, a daughter of Commodore Andrews, who 
was lost on the war-ship Ontario, which was lost on the lake, off Niagara, 
with all on board. Colonel Givins received the appointment of Agent for 
the Indian Department, which office he held until his death. He left a 
family, as follows: Henry Hamilton; Caroline H., who married Colonel 
Hillier, Aide-de-Camp to Sir P. Maitland; James (Judge Givins, of London, 
Ont.); Cecil; Saltern (Canon Givins); Elizabeth; and George, for twenty 
years Surgeon-Major on Her l\Iajesty's Medical Staff in India. 


ARTHUR Vy. GODSON, contractor, was born in Warwickshire, England, in 
1845, being the youngest son in a family of seven children. His father, George 
Godson, came to Canada with his family in 1849 and died in 1866. Arthur 
Godson was married in 1871. He has been employed upon the public 
works of Toronto for the past fifteen years, having laid at least two-thirds 
of the block paving in this city. In 1881 he completed the contract for 
paving Y onge Street, and subsequently completed Beverley Street, a portion 
of King Street, and others. He also constructed and completed the Sub-way 
between Parkdale and the city. 


JAMES GOODERHAM. The subject of this sketch, was the second son of 
the late \i\Tm. Gooderham, Esq., and was born in Norfolk, England, 
December 29th, 1825. At the age of seven years he accompanied the other 
members of the family to Canada and settled in York, where he was 
educated. He was always an earnest, thoughtful and conscientious youth, 
and his mind was early imbued with serious thoughts of religion. It was 
when about sixteen years old and during a short residence at the Village of 
Thornhill, that he became converted
 and the event left its impress upon his 
character through all the subsequent years of his life. Sometime afterward 
his leanings towards the ministry induced him to enter Victoria College
 
with a view to prepare himself for the sacred calling of a Methodist minister. 
In 1848 he was appointed junior preacher on the Whitby circuit, and so 
earnest was he and diligent in the discharge of his pastoral duties, so 
devoted in his self-sacrificing zeal, that during that year between two and 
three hundred were added to the membership of the church on his circuit 
by conversion. The following year he was appointed to the Markham 



City of Toronto. 


55 


circuit, but the wasting labours of his previous charge had so exhausted his 
physical powers that it soon became evident it would be impossible for him 
to continue in the regular work of the ministry. But though forced, by 
circumstances beyond his control, to abandon his cherished calling, he never 
lost the spirit of a minister of Christ. He loved to preach the Gospel, and 
amid the cares and activities of secular life, found frequent opportunity to 
labour in various ways for the salvation of sinners, and took a deep interest 
in missionary work. He was often associated with leading ministers of his 
Church at dedicatory services in various parts of the country, and it was 
not an uncommon thing to see the announcement of Dr. Ryerson, or Dr. 
Wood, or Dr. Rose, or some other distinguished divine to preach in the 
morning, and James Gooderham, Esq., in the afternoon. On July 23, 18 5 0 , 
Mr. Gooderham was married at Oshawa to Miss Gibbs, daughter of the 
late Thomas Gibbs, Esq., and sister of the late Hon. T. N. Gibbs, of that 
place; he afterwards engaged in business in N orval, with one of his 
brothers; in 1859 removing to Meadowvale, and in 1863 to Streetsville, 
where he engaged in merchandise and milling. At the latter place he also 
managed the linen mills of Messrs. Gooderham & \Yorts, until they were 
burned down. During his residence in Streetsville, which continued until 
1877, he was a prominent and useful citizen, taking a deep interest in the 
prosperity of the town and holding the office of Reeve for eight years. In 
the last named. year 1\1r. Gooderham removed to Toronto, where his home 
henceforth remained, though he still retained his large property and busi- 
ness interests at Streetsville. He was a Director of the London and Ontario 
Loan Society from its inception, and Vice-President of the Dominion Tele- 
graph Company, both of which corporations at his death presented to Mrs. 
Gooderham, handsomly engrossed resolutions testifying to the respect in 
which he was held, and lamenting his sudden loss. Mr. Gooderham was 
one of the first to advocate the project of the Credit Valley Railway, and 
actively supported the enterprise until its success was assured. He was a 
man of remarkable business talents, pushing and energetic, but withal, 
quiet and unassuming. He induced the residents of Streetsville and other 
municipalities to grant large bonuses to the road. On May loth, 1879, he 
accompanied a party of prominent citizens from Toronto, to inspect the road 
as far as completed. At Streetsville he made a short address, justifying 
himself in the course he had pursued in connection with the råad, and 
pointing with pride and pleasure to the rapid completion, not only of that 
branch, but of the whole line, and, as might have been expected, was warmly 
congratulated on the result of his labours, even by those who had strongly 
opposed him at the outset. A few hours after this address of congratula- 



56 


Bz'ograþhical Notices. 


tion a collision occurred on the road which resulted in Mr. Gooderham 
. 
receiving fatal injuries. He survived long enough to be brought home, 
retaining consciousness to the last; he died the death of a sincere and 
exemplary Christian. He was buried in the family vault in St. James' 
Cemetery, his funeral being from the Metropolitan Church, and one of the 
largest ever seen in the city. There is no fitter eulogy on the life of any 
man than is expressed in the words of Rev. Dr. Potts on this occasion: 
" Wise in counsel, prudent in action, intuitively discerning and unflinching 
in performing the right, there was in his character the true ideal of a man 
and a Christian." 


PATRICK GRAHAM, retired, was born in the County Tipperary, Ireland, 
in 1802, being the eldest in a family of four sons and four daughters, born to 
John and Mary (Power) Graham. In 1832 he came to Canada and worked 
on the Purdue farm, near Toronto, and for two years on the farm owned by 
Captain W. Baldwin. He then bought two hundred acres of land in the 
Township of Asphodel, County of Peterborough; but after clearing ten 
acres and losing his first crop he became discouraged and sold the land. 
Then he came to Toronto and became a clerk in the store of George 
Cheeney, dry-goods merchant. At the end of two years he married Bridget 
IVladigan, and bought the property on the south-west corner of \Vellington 
and Scott Streets, the present site of the Great North-\Vestern Telegraph 
Company's office, paying three hundred pounds for it, and a one and a-half 
storey house which s_tood on it. There he and his wife kept a private 
boarding-house until 1871, when the Montreal Telegraph Company paid 
him $10,000 for the lot. Mr. Graham is a Conservative in politics. By his 
marriage with Miss Madigan he has one son and tW? daughters living. 


CHRISTOPHER GRAY, Superintendent of the St. James' Cemetery, was 
born at Ros'3 Head, Ireland, in 1826, and came to Canada in 1842. He 
was a nurseryman and gardener in the Old Country, and his lifework has 
been devoted to the care and culture of plants, shrubs and trees. He has 
been connected with the cemetery sixteen years, and in charge of the same 
thirteen years. Mr. Gray married, in 1857, Ellen Gamble, a native of 
Ireland, who came to Canada same year as himself. They have four 
children, three daughters and one son. 


MAJOR JOHN GRAY, M.P.P., Parkdale, was born in Yorkville,sth January, 
1837, being the only surviving child of John and Jane Gray, who were both 
born in the County of Meath, Ireland. His father was a nurseryman arid 
was killed at a railway crossing, January 13th, 1878. The subject of this 



City of Toronto. 


57 


. sketch was educated at home and at G. F. Needham's Academy, Rochester, 
N ew York. On his father's death he succeeded him ill business, which he 
still carries on. In 1861 he was married to Catharine Angeline, daughter 
of Joseph Calverley, of Orillia. Mr. Calverley was born in Hull, England, 
and married Mary A. Stewart, of London, England. By his marriage 
Major Gray has six chiidren, viz.: \Villiam Thomas, John Calverley, Frank 
Albert, Emma Louisa, Ida Marion and Caroline. In religion he is a 
member of the Church of England. Major Gray is a Liberal-Conservative 
and in the elections of February, 1883, for the Ontario Legislature, was 
returned for \V est York, redeeming a constituency which for twelve years 
had been Reform. He is a member of the A.F. and A.M., C.O.O.F., also 
President of the Toronto Electoral Division, and second Vice-presidept of 
the Toronto Horticultural Society. Major Gray was enrolled in the Toronto 
Field Battery in 1856, and in 1860 was appointed Drill Instructor. On 
March 8th, 1856, he was commissioned First Lieutenant, and in October, 
1869, was with a division of the battery on board the gunboat Prince Alfred, 
which was cruising from Sarnia to Amherstburg. In 1870 he was com- 
missioned Captain; in 1875 Brevet Major, and in 1883 Major commanding 
the Toronto Field Battery. He commanded the brigade of artillery in 
camp in 1882, r883 and 1884. On May 8th, 1877, he received a letter of 
thanks from the Major-General commanding the Militia, for his offer to raise 
a battery for active service in the East. On the incorporation of Parkdale 
in 1879, he was elected reeve, and occupied that position for three years. 


JOSEPH GRAY, 194 Beverley Street, was born in London in 1816, and 
came to Canada in 1834. On his arrival in Toronto he entered the service 
of J. D. & G. Ridout, as an assistant, and remained about six months, 
removing afterwards to what is now known as \Villow Dale, where he 
taught school for ten years. He had received a good education at Madras 
House, Hackney, London, which fitted him for almost any position; on 
giving up teaching he returned to the city and was engaged as book-keeper 
and clerk in the wholesale store of B. Thorne & Co. After some time spent 
in this occupation, he entered the service of the Port Hope and Lindsay 
Railroad, since called the Midland Railway; subsequently appointed as 
Receiver by the Bank of Upper Canada. He engaged with the N ipissing 
Railroad Company, as accountant, in November, 1873. and continued to act 
in that capacity until the railway was sold in 1881. Mr. Gray is a member 
of the St. George's Society, and a follower of the Methodist Church. He 
married in 1839, Rachael, daughter of Isaac Lamoreaux, who was one of 
the early settlers in Scarboro' Township. Mr. Lamoreaux was ninety-nine 



58 


Biographical Notices. 


years and ten months old when he died. -Mr. Gray married again, his . 
second wife being Elizabeth, daughter of Adam Break, of Markham. Mr. 
Gray received by presentation a handsome watch from Mr. Gooderham, 
on the occasion of his retirement from the services of the Toronto and 
Nipissing Railroad Company. 


SAMUEL DAVID HAGEL, M.D., was born at Hagel's Corners, in the County 
of Oxford, Ontario, in 1842, on the farm owned and reclaimed from the 
forest by his father, Samuel Hagel, who was also a born resident of that 
district. The parents on both sides were of U .E. Loyalist descent. His 
early education was received at the Common and Grammar schools of his 
native county. He also taught school for nearly eight years in the same 
county. In 1867 he matriculated in medicine at the University of Toronto, 
graduating in 1873, receiving the University and State medals for that 
year, and the scholarship for the previous year. On graduating he 
immediately began practice in this city, where he has built up a large and 
. lucrative practice. Dr. Hagel organized and commanded a company of 
volunt
ers in the 22nd Oxford Rifles, during the Fenian troubles of 1866. 
He married in 1864, Miss Mary Ann Moyer, of Oxford County, by whom 
he has three daughters, all living. 


J. B. HALL, M.D., M.C.P.S., of Hahnemann Villa, 326 and 328 Jarvis 
Street, is a native of Lincoln, England. He received his education at the 
University of Oberlin, 0:; Homæopathic Hospital College of Cleveland, 
and the Missouri Homæopathic College of S1. Louis, Mo. In 1862 he 
established practice in Cleveland, afterwards St. Paul, Minn., where he 
remained several years, and commenced practice in Toronto in 1880. Dr. 
Hall is an out-and-out exponent of the principles of homæopathy. 


WILLIAM HALL was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland, 1800. His 
parents were Charles and Mary (Carruthers) Hall. He crossed the Atlantic 
in 1824 and settled in the City of Boston, where he resided about seven 
years, learning while there the trade of carpenter. He returned to Ireland 
in 1831, and after a stay of two years came back to Boston. In 1834 he 
married Margaret, eldest daughter of Mitchell and Isabella (Armstrong) 
Swords, and two months after this event he removed to Little York, where 
he purchased a lot and built a home. He worked for the late Richard 
W oodsworth for ten years; the latter had the order to build the scaffold on 
which Lount and 1\iatthews were to be hung. but Mr. Hall refused decidedly 
to work at it. 1\1r. Hall is and always has been a staunch Reformer in 
politics, and a Methodist in religion. He occupied a seat in the Council as 



City of Toronto. 


59 


representative of St. John's Ward in 1853, and was also School Trustee for 
St. Patrick's Ward. Mr. Hall is still living at his home on Seaton Street, 
and has arrived at the good old age of eighty-five years; he has one 
daughter and two sons; the former is a widow and resides with him. Mark 
Hall, the eldest son, was born in 1837, and is an architect by profession. 
He early learned the building business with his father, who carried on that 
business for many years, retiring in 1870. 


SIDNEY HAMILTON is descended from a family of U. E. Loyalists. His 
grandfather, Thomas Hamilton, after serving through the Revolutionary 
\Var, settled in Nova Scotia with his family. The parents of our subject, 
Thomas and Ann Hamilton, left Nova Scotia and settled at Port Dover, 
Upper Canada, upon wild land, which they cleared and resided upon several 
years; Thomas, a brother of our subject, being the first white child born in 
that neighbourhood. \Vhile living at Port Dover a journey of fifteen miles 
had frequently to be made to grind a grist of corn, while flour was procured 
from Chippewa. In 1795 Mr. Hamilton removed to York, and purchased 
two acres of land on the north-east corner of King and George Streets, 
where he built a house, which became the family residence for a number 
of years. During the \Var of 1812 he opened a general store in the 
same house, and shortly afterwards built the Hamilton Hotel and Ship- 
Hotel on Market Street. During the early days of senior wh. Hamilton's 
residence in York he purchased a small schooner, and was engaged in 
carrying passengers to and from Niagara. He belonged to the York volun- 
teers, and participated in the defen.ce of York. After its capitulation the 
American soldiers discovered his red coat hanging in his house, and were 
about to take him prisoner, when, through the intercession of some of the 
American officers, he was liberated. He afterwards became Coroner of the 
United Counties, and also served a number of years as Deputy-Sheriff. 
He died at the age of sixty-five. Sidney was the youngest of a family of 
ten children, born in York, February 2nd, I8I1. He. attended the early 
schools of the pl
ce; after the death of his father he began sailing on the 
lakes. The first vessel he commanded was the schooner vVood Duck, 
after which he owned in succession the Commerce, the TVilliam Gamble, 
the Rose, the Isabella and the Alliance. \Vith the latter he was engaged 
in transporting merchandise between Halifax and Chicago. In 1864, in 
connection with his son Robert, he established another dock in Toronto, 
known as Hamilton's vVharf, and IS now engaged in the same busi- 
ness at the George Street Elevator. During the Rebellion of 1837 he 
belonged to the old fire brigade, and was on duty at the Don Bridge. In 
politics he has always been a pronounced Reformer, and in religion a 



60 


B'iograPhical Notices. 


member of the Zion Congregational Church. In 1837 he married Ann 
Coulthard, by whom he had eleven children (eight sons and three daughters), 
of whom four are now living. Margaret married \Villiam Evans, of 5t. 
Catharines; Robert is in business with his father; Elizabeth married 10hn 
Adams, Assistant Inspector for the Bank of Toronto; Henry, a barrister, 
is now practising law at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 


JOHN HARPER, retired builder and architect, is the son of Richard 
Harper, an Englishman, who left Belfast, Ireland, in 1810, and crossing the 
ocean settled in New York, where for seven years he manufactured looms. 
Richard Harper's wife was Jane, eldest daughter of James Dalrymple, a 
Scotchman, by whom he had one son, John, and two daughters, Elizabeth, 
the widow of \Villiam Somerset; and Catharine who is dead. In 1817 the 
family left New York, and crossing Lake Ontario in the schooner M ayfiower 
(Captain Paterson), located at Little York, where Richard Harper com- 
\. menced his business, that of a builder. He died in 1834; his wife died in 
1836. John Harper was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1806, and came to 
America with his parents. He learned the building trade with his father, 
and continued at it from 1829 until 1856. He built the stone barracks for 
.the New Fort, St. Michael's Cathedral, Trinity Church (Trinity Square), the 
.General Hospital, and the first Observatory in Toronto, besides numerous 
private residences; he also laid the foundation for the Lunatic Asylum. In 
1856 Mr. Harper became an architect, and superintended the erection of the 
Post Office, and the Court Street Fire Hall and' Police Station. In 1834 
he built what is now the Newsboys' Home, but which was then intended for 
the Canada Company's Offices; he also built the first depot and machine 
shop for the Northern Railway. Mr. Harper sat in the City Council dUrIng 
the first three years of its incorporation, 1834-5-6; he was assessor for St. 
James's Ward for a number of years. He was offered the appointment 
of Justice of the Peace, but considering that it would interfere with his 
business he declined the honour. In politics he is a Reformer, and in 
re
igion, a Methodist. Mr. Harper married the youngest daughter of 
Wm. Miles, of Ireland, by whom he has now living three sons, William, 
John and George; and one daughter married to J. P. Edwards. George 
R. Harper, architect, is the youngest in a family of ten children, and was 
born in Toronto in 1843. He commenced the study of architecture in 
1861, in the office of the late \Vrn. Irving, with whom he remained for three 
years; then he went to New York, and at the end of five years returned 
to Toronto, where he has been ever since. He made the designs for the 
Police Court building, and built Gurney's foundry, besides other large 
buildings. He has been a member of the City Council. . 



CÜy of Torollto. 


61 


REVEREND ELMORE HARRIS, B.A., Pastor of Bloor Street Baptist 
Church, is the second son of Alanson Harris, Esq., of English descent, 
of the firm of A. Harris, Son & Co., manufacturers of mowers and reapers, 
Brantford, Ontario, and a prominent citizen of that city
 -Mr. Harris, 
sen'r, was born in Oxford County, Ontario, about 1820, and married, in 
184-0, Miss :Mary Morgan, of Beamsville, and formerly of Glamorganshire, 
Wales. The Rev. Elmore Harris was born near Brantford. He received 
his early education at the High School, Beamsville, and subsequently at St. 
Catharines Collegiate Institute. In 1872 he entered on his University 
course at Toronto, and graduated in 1877. In 1876 he took charge of the 
Centre Street Baptist Church, in St. Thomas, Ontario, where he remained 
until 1882. About this time he received a call from the congregation of 
the Y orkville Baptist Church, and took charge of the same; but the locality 
proving most inconvenient it was determined to erect a new church, which 
was carried out at a cost of nearly $40,000. The new church was built 
on Bloor Street West, corner of North. The average attendance in 1882 
was about one hundred, 
nd has since increased to five hundred. In 1877 
the subject of this sketch married Miss Ruth .Shenston, youngest daughter 
of T. S. Shenston. Esq., RegIstrar of Brant County, Ontario. They have 
two children, Burton and Helen Mary. The new church referred to is fully 
described on page 3 I 6, Vol. I. 


SAMUEL RETALLACK HARRIS, a York Pioneer, and a well-known and 
highly-respected citizen of Toronto, was born at Roseneaque, the parish of 
St. Keverne, near Helston, Cornwall, England, in 1818. He was the 
youngest son in a family of seven children, two boys and five girls; born to 
John and Mary (Retallack) Harris. His father was a farmer, who lived on 
his farm for about seventy-five years, and died in 1873, in the ninety-fifth year 
of his age. There is now only one sister liviIlg at St. Kevernë. 1\lr. Harris 
. left home when thirteen years of age to learn a trade, and remained away 
about three years-until his mother's death, which took place in I834-and 
the same year he took passage on a sailing vessel bound for the New \\1 odd. 
The time occupied in the voyage was five weeks and three days, from the 
point of departure to the arrival in Quebec, and the journey from that point 
to Toronto was accomplished in two weeks. The mode of locomotion was 
in Durham boats, drawn by oxen, and the route lay through the Rideau 
Canal. From Kingston they took the steamer William IV., by which 
means the journey was completed. The description given by Mr. Harris 
of the appearance of Toronto at that time (1834-) is worth recording. He 
says: "Well do I remember going from .the market up King Street to 



62 


Biographical Notices. 


Yonge, jumping from one stone to another, there being no sidewalks. From 
King up to Yonge Street was a better sidewalk on the west side, laid down 
by our old and esteemed friend, Jesse Ketchum, with tan bark. There were 
no brick bvildings as now. There was an old fence covered with hides 
drying for the tannery. In this same year," continues Mr. Harris, "\Villiam 
Lyon Mackenzie was elected Mayor of Toronto, not by the people but by 
the Council." Mr. Harris did not remain long in Toronto on his first visit, 
but returned to Kingston and entered the employ of John Collar, a boot 
and shoe merchant, with whom he stayed four years, and it was during this 
period that the Rebellion broke out. Mr. Harris became a volunteer in 
Captain James Jackson's Company and was under arms six months, but 
never saw much active service; he was a Sergeant in his corps. In 1838 
he once more found his way to Toronto, and although work was plentiful 
there was hardly any money in circulation, wages being chiefly paid in store 
goods. In 1838 T. D. Harris first issued his twenty-five and fifty-cent 
" shin-plasters," which currency passed as good as gold in those days. Mr. 
Harris also 
ecords the fact that not many improvements were made in the 
city until 1840. "When you see the large brick buildings fast taking 
the place of the old shanties on King Street; who would have thought," 
he exclaims, "that the Toronto of 1834 would be the Toronto of to-day?" 
Mr. Harris was married in the year 1850, his wife being Ann, daughter of 
Richard Hocken, of Montreal. The family were of English extraction, and 
came to Canada in 181.8. By his marriage he has four sons living, and one 
daughter, Mrs. J. H. A. Taylor, living in Toronto. His youngest son 
resides i
 the city, and is book-keeper to Messrs. i\'[ason & Risch; the other 
three sons are in the United States. Mr. Harris has taken an active part 
in the affairs of mutual benefit societies and brotherhoods, and was ini- 
tiated in the City of Toronto Lodge of Oddfellows in 1844, and is now the 
oldest initiated Oddfellow of good standing in the city. . He was elected 
Grand Master of the Order ih 1870, and retired the following year. Mr. 
Harris was presented with a gold watch and chain, and his wife with a 
silver tea service by the brethren of Toronto. He is now a member of the 
Ontario; the Dominion; the Alma and the Purple Encampment (Hamilton 
Orders). On March 18th, 1862, he joined the \\Tilson Lodge (No. 86) of 
Freemasons, and is still a member of good standing. He was elected and 
held the office of Treasurer of that Lodge for ten years, and at the end of 
five years' service in that capacity he was presented with a Mason's gold 
ring, and on his retirement from the same, received a testimonial taking the 
form of a gold-headed cane. Mr. Harris filled the position of postmaster 
at Y orkville for one year in 1862; which position he resigned. In religion 
he belongs to the Chur"ch of England. 



Ct"ty of Toronto. 


63 


GEORGE HASKIN was born in Devonshire, England, in 1844, and in 
1870 came to Canada, locating in Toronto. He was traveller for O'Keefe, 
the brewer, for seven years, and shortly after engaged in the hotel business, 
at the corner of King and Princess Streets, known as the Red Rose Hotel. 
This he continued till 1883, since which time he has been engaged in erecting 
houses. In 1865 he married Miss Annie Palfree, a native of Devonshire, 
also, by whom he has two sons. 


G. M. HAWKE was born in Bath, Ontario, August 12th, 1826, being 
the third son in a family of seven children. His father, Anthony Baudon 
Hawke, came to Canada from Cornwall, England, at the close of the War of 
1812, and settled in Prince Edward County. He was afterwards appointed 
Chief Emigration Agent of Upper Canada, and came to live in Toronto; he 
died in Whitby, October, 1865. At his death he left a family of two 
sons and three daughters, viz.: Edward Henry, living in N ew York; 
George M.; Louisa, marri
d Judge Dartnell; Harriet, married Lyman 
English, of Oshawa; Eliza, married Mr. Hawkins, of Colchester. 


CHARLES HEATH was born in India, and was the only son in a family 
of three children. His father was Brigadier-General Heath, who was born 
in Lexington, Essex, England. He entered the British army when quite 
young, and was killed in action at Madras, India. l\Ir. Heath came to 
Canada in 1836, and was followed by his mother shortly afterwards. He 
purchased Deer Park. After he came here he was for some years in the 
Dragoons, and was a volunteer during the Mackenzie Rebellion; he rose 
from the rank of First Cornet to that of Major. In 1847 he was admitted to 
the bar. 


ALEXANDER HENDERSON, J.P., is a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 
and was born in the year 1824- He came to Canada in 1834, locating in 
Little York, being at that time about ten years of age. He entered 
the general business. house of \Villiam Mathers, Queen Street West, then 
known as Lot Street. In 1842 he commenced business for himself with 
such success that he was enabled in 1857 to retire, and has since lived as a 
private gentleman. Among the positions of public trust held by Mr. Hen- 
derson, it may þe mentioned that he was for ten years an Alderman, and 
filled for five years the Chairmanship of Finance, and the Boards of Works 
and Health. He was a Director of the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway, 
and also occupied a similar position in connection with the Union Building 
Society for upwards of twenty years. He was a Director of the House of 
Industry, and has been a member of St. Andrew's Society since 1836. 
Mr. Henderson can remember many of the striking incidents that occurred 


.. 



64 


Bz'ographical -,-Votices. 


during the Rebellion, and was an eye-witness of the execution of Lount and 
Matthews. He was appointed a Justice of the Peace for the City of 
Toronto and County of York some years ago, which position he fills with 
considerable ability. His residence is 50 Gerrard Street East. 


ANDREW HERON, at the present time the oldest native resident of the 
City of Toronto, the third son of Samuel and Sarah (Ash bridge) Heron, 
was born on November 30th, 1800, in a small log house erected by his 
father on the north side of Duke Street, near the present residence of the 
Hon. M. C. Cameron. His father was the youngest of a family of three 
sons, born at Kirkcudbright, Scotland, 1770. He emigrated to New York 
City, where he remained a short time, and then made his way to Niagara. 
In the spring of 1792 he left Niagara, with an ox team and cart laden with 
provisIOns and tools necessary in a new settlement, and journeyed around 
the lake by way of Hamilton. On arriving at the Don River, he crossed 
over in a rough SCOW, and proceeded to what is now known as Ashbridge's 
Bay, and took up two hundred acres of land, where he found Mrs. Ashbridge 
and her sons, who had settled there a few months previous. December J 4th, 
1794, he married Sarah Ashbridge, whose people were English Quakers 
from Philadelphia. Being U. E. Loyalists, the mother and sons drew land 
from the Crown. In 1796 Mr. Heron concluded to try his fortune in 
mercantile life, and accordingly erected the log house on Duke Street and 
a log store on King Street. His first stock of goods was procured from 
Montreal. He continued in business for a few years, and subsequently 
settled on a Government tract of land of two hunòred acres, on Y onge Street, 
about seven miles from the bay. It was located near what was called Heron's 
Hill, afterwards Hogg's Hollow. The steady and rapid influx of a thrifty 
class of emigrants and the clearing of. their lands, offered inducements for 
other enterprises. He erected a saw and grist-mill, ashery and distillery, 
and opened a market for ashes which he converted into potash. His 
business increased rapidly,- and was in a thriving condition when in 1817 
he died. Andrew Heron, the subject of this sketch, resided with his 
father until 1811, when he was sent to Niagara to live with his uncle 
Andrew, his father's brother, who was a merchant at the latter place. 
After attending school for a short period he entered his uncle's store as a 
clerk. In 1812, at the breaking out of the war between the United States 
and Great Britain, he was attending school at Niagara, in close proximity 
to Fort George. The same spirit that provoked the two nations to draw 
th
 sword was shared by the youth of that day, and many were the battles 
fought between juvenile rebels and loyalists, who used stones to good 



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City of Toronto. 


65 


advantage, the former being often compelled to take refuge within the fort. 
\Vhen York was attacked, in April, 1813, by the American fleet under 
Commodore Chauncey and General Dearborn, l\1r. Heron was upon 
Niagara Commons. He heard the roar of cannon and the explosion of the 
powder magazine, and .naturally felt very anxious about the fate of his 
father and brother, who belonged to the York Militia, which participated in 
the engagement. His brother John fought at the battle of Lundy's Lane, 
where he was shot. While he lay in a ploughed field, the enemy passed 
over him, thinking him dead. He afterwards rejoined the British forces, 
and, having served during the war, received a pension until his death. 
Andrew was also at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He saw the Ameri- 
can prisoners as they were escorted through Niagara on their way down 
the lake, and was present at the funeral of General Brock, who had fallen 
at Queenston Heights, while cheering on his men to the attack. He was at 
Niagara when the Americans burned and sacked the town, and witnessed 
his uncle's house and store devoured by the flames. After the close of the 
war Mr. Heron was summoned by the Government to Ancaster to give 
evidence against some American sympathizers, who were tried and con- 
victed before Chief Justice Robinson. In 1819 l\Ir. Heron left Niagara and 
came to York, working upon his uncle Ashbridge's farm until 1822, when 
he returned to Niagara, where he rented from his uncle Andrew a small 
row boat, which he began plying between Niagara and the Youngstown 
ferry. "Sevenpence ha'penny" was the fare charged for one passenger. The 
fresh arrival of immigrants at that time rendering ferry business very pro- 
fitable, the enterprising young boatman was soon compelled to increase the 
facilities for transit. He constructed a horse. boat-the horse being on deck 
attached to a windlass, which transferred the power to a wheel at the stern. 
Mr. Heron continued running the ferry until 1835. In 1829 he married 
Cynthia, youngest daughter of Cornelius Beaugardis, an American lady of 
German extraction, by whom he had four sons and one daughter, only one 
son now surviving. In. 1835 he placed the ferry business in charge of 
another person, and opened a store at the Town of Niagara, which he con- 
ducted until 1838, when, in consequence of the increasing travel, he 
embarked in the steamboat business, by forming a joint partnership with 
Thomas Lockhart and Thomas Dick. The first boat, called the Experi- 
ment, was launched at Niagara and ran between York and Hamilton. She 
did not prove to be a paying investment, and was sold upon Mr. Lockhart 
retiring from the business, which was conducted by Mr. Heron and 
Captain Dick, who soon after built the City of Toronto, a side-wheel boat 
built at Niagara in 1840, afterwards called the Algonza. 
6 



66 


Biographical Notices. 


JAMES HERSON, provision dealer, was born in the County of Tyrone, 
Ireland, in 1831, and when only three months old was brought to Canada 
by his parents, John and Tvlary 
nn (MacDonald) Herson. He was the 
youngest in a family of five sons and four daughters. His father located in 
Little York, and being a carpenter carried on that trade; but only for a 
few months however, for, before a year had elapsed, he died from sunstroke; 
three of his sons also were carpenters. When he attained the age of fifteen 
he entered the employ of Andrew Heron, who owned several steamers. 
He ran on the old City of Toronto, the Chief Justice Robinson, the 
American, the EcliPse, and the Peerless (on which he was steward), 
owned by Mr. Heron and Captain Dick; it 
an between Toronto and 
Niagara, and made two trips a day. Mr. Herson was on the Rescue 
that ran on Lake Superior, between Collingwood and Fort \Villiam, and 
had the honour of assorting the first mail that passed through Canadian 
territory. After leaving the steamer Rescue, he went fur trading among 
the Indians on the North Shore of Lake Superior, where he lived four years, 
during that time undergoing great hardships and having no nearer white 
neighbour than within a distance of eighty miles. He subsequently left 
that part of the country and engaged in blockade running until the close of 
the American War. This event over he went into business as provision 
dealer iu St. Lawrence Market of this city, where he has since remained. 
He has two sisters living in Toronto and one in Dresden, Onto l\1r. Herson 
married a daughter of George Lennon. Our subject does not take much 
interest in municipal affairs, but has been a member of the Separate School 
Board. 


WILLIAM HEWITT, deceased, was born at Hazelen, Essex, England, 
July 21st, 1794. He came to :Montreal in 1820, and remained one season, 
at the end of which he returned home; four years later he came to York 
and located on King Street, near the Market, where he was engaged as a 
manufacturer for five years. During his residence in Toronto, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hewitt (Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Richardson, whom he married 
on January 28th, 1819), were two of nine members who organized the first 
Baptist Church in York (now the Jarvis Street Baptist Church); three years 
later he removed to the Credit, where he remained a short time and then 
settled at Charlotteville, where he remained until the time of his death on 
August 1st, 1883. He held the office of Clerk of Division Court for forty- 
eight years, the duties of which office were punctually and satisfactorily 
discharged by him. He was also a magistrate for many years; in politics he 
was a Baldwin Reformer. Although nearly ninety years of age his mental 



Czty of Toronto. 


67 


faculties were clear and his mind seemed unimpaired up to the day of his 
death. For over 
ixty years he honoured his profession as a Christian and 
then passed away one of Ontario's oldest Baptists. well versed in the history 
, of the church, an original thinker, highly intelligent, a true Christian and a 
gentleman. The high esteem in which he was held was evinced by the 
attendance of a large number of the oldest anò most influential citizens at 
his funeral. He was a much-loved parent of eleven children, ten of whom 
survived him: Joseph R. (in Springfield, l'vlass.); \Yilliam, 31 :\Iagill 
Street; John, died in 1855; Thomas, carriage manufacturer, Templeton, 
l\Iass.; Elizabeth, Sarah, David and George, twins, Toronto, Ont; Mary, 
living at Vittoria; Ellen, married John Palmer, a builder, Chicago; Han- 
nah, married Joseph Pullan, Barrie, Ont.; \Villiam, passed his early life at 
Norfolk, Ont., until he was eighteen years of age; he came to Toronto in 
18 39, and entered the service óf the late Peter Paterson, hardware dealer, 
with whom he served for eighteen years; he then engaged in business for 
himself, on the corner of Yonge and Adelaide Streets, for twenty-hvo years. 
For some time past he has been representing various manufacturing firms 
throughout Ontario. In 1846 he married Mary, daughter of James Skirrow, 
of the Township of Trafalgar, who was one of the earliest settlers. There 
are at the present time twenty-two grand and eighteen great-grandchildren 
descendants of Mr. \Vm. Hewitt, sen'r. ' 


ROBERT JOH
 HILL, retired, was born in Buckinghamshire, England, 
September loth, 1820, being the eldest of seven children. His parents, 
James and Mary (Aris) Hill, came from England with their family in 1825, 
and settled at Utica, N.Y. In 1829 they left there and came to Little 
York by way of the Erie Canal, and across the lake from Lewiston in the 
steamer Canada, commanded by Captain Hugh Richardson. For a while 
they stayed at an hotel on Church Street, kept by a wan named Secord; 
then they moved into a small house on Adelaide Street. J ames Hill was a 
carpenter and worked at that trade until 1834 when he died of the cholera; 
his wife died in 1879. The subject of this sketch was educated at the old 
central school of which Mr. Sprague, father of the late Chief Justice, was 
the master. \Vhile still a boy he became apprenticed for six years to John 
Esmond, that he might learn the tinsmith trade (Esmond's shop was on the 
north side of King, between Bay and York Streets). He then worked for 
Mr. \Villiam Musson for four years, after which he was in the employ of 
Hiram Piper for five or six years, and subsequently in that of Henry Booth 
for five years. Mr. Hill became a member of the fire brigade in 1839, before 
his apprenticeship had expired; at that time Hiram Piper was Captain of 


. 



68 


Biographical Nott"ces. 


the hook-and-ladder company, while \Villiam Musson was Captain of Nos. 
I and 2 hand engines, which were very primitive affairs. Mr. Hill was 
Captain of the hook-and-ladder company for twelve years. He witnessed 
many of the events of the Rebellion of 1837-8. He was one of the guards 
placed over John Montgomery when the latter was arrested and confined in 
the Parliament House. Mr. Hill has been twice married; first to Jane, 
daughter of John \Vardrobe, of Cumberland, England; his second wife 
was 
Irs. Salters, whose maiden name was Armstrong. He has a son living 
in \Voodstock. In politics Mr. Hill is a Conservative. He is still in the 
Toronto Fire Brigade as engineer of the steamer" James B. Boustead," 
and his cry is " Ever ready." . 


WILLIAM HILL was born in England in 1832. He came to Canada in 
18 5 1 , and the same year removed to the United States where he stayed 
four years. In 1855 he again took up his residence in Toronto. He has 
held the position of Inspector of Drains for the city the last five years. In 
18 53 he married Miss Jane Ripon who died in 1854, leaving one child. He 
married again, his second wife being Miss Jane Smith, by whom he had 
nine children, seven of whom are living. 


VVILLIAM HILL, jun'r, 71 Cumberland Street, was born on lot 5, con- 
ceSSIOn I, west of Yonge Street in 1816. His grandfather, Thomas Hill, 
and his father, vVilliam Hill, emigrated from Somersetshire, England, in 
1793, and landed at St. John, New Brunswick, with Governor Simcoe. 
They arrived at Little York in 1794 and pitched their tents on the west 
side of the River Don, the place being then marked by three Indian wig- 
wams. In 1803 his grandfather removed from Little York to lot IS, con- 
cession I, York Township, and afterwards located on lot 5, west of Yonge 
Street, where his grandfather and father died. His father left at his 
death six sons and six daughters. The subject of this sketch came to 
Toronto in 1839 and worked at his trade of carpenter. He married in 1836, 

Iargaret Cathcart, daughter of the late Alexander Cathcart, of York 
Township. 
C. A. HIRSCHFELDER, U. S. Vice-Consul, 111 ail buildings, 52 and 54 
King Street West, is a native of Toronto, being the son of J. M. Hirsch- 
felder, Professor of Oriental Languages, Toronto University. He was 
appointed U. S. Vice-Consul on the retirement of Mr. D. Thurston. Mr. 
Hirschfelder is a Canadian archæologist, which he has made a life study, 
whose lectures and writings on this and kindred topics, together with his 
collection of Canadian archæology, now in the Dominion Museum, Ottawa, 




 


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City of Toronto. 


69 


has given him a wide reputation. The collection is said to be one of the 
finest in the world of Canadian archæology. l\1r. Hirschfelder IS a member 
of many learned societies in Europe and America. 


JOHN HIRST was born in \Vakefield, Yorkshire, England. He emI- 
grated to Canada in 185+, and located at Toronto, where he followed his 
trade of painter, working for the Grand Trunk Railway Company. He 
remained at this occupation until 1863, entering then into the hotel 
business, taking charge of the St. Lawrence Hotel, on King Street. He 
then went to the corner of Berkeley and King Streets, subsequently to 
Francis Street, afterwards to the Schiller House. He remained at the latter 
place nine years, and previous to retiring from business was for some time 
proprietor of the Russell House, on Y onge Street. He retired in 1883, 
having conducted the hotel business uninterruptedly for twenty-two years. 
Mr. Hirst married in 1854, previous to leaving England, Miss Sarah Graves 
Cherry, of Yorkshire, England, by whom he has six daughters and one son 
living. He is largely interested in real estate, owning fourteen houses in 
the city. 


JOHN G. HOWARD, Esq., the well-known Ranger of High Park, to 
whose munificent liberality the people of Toronto owe the magnificent 
stretch of woodland at the western city limits which bears that name, is not 
only one of the oldest residents in the city, but has also, perhaps, from his 
own professional point of view, been more closely identified with the city's 
growth and improvement than any of his contemporaries. As will be seen 
further on, Mr. Howard has had a hand in the construction of nearly all 
the local public institutions and works that are not of recent date, and in 
the pursuit of his profession he has been brought into contact with the 
majority of the public men whose names figure prominently in the early 
history of the city and county. The writer has had an opportunity of 
examining Mr. Howard's notes of his impressions and experiences in York; 
and will, as occasion requires, freely draw in the following sketch upon 
this fund of old time reminiscences. l\1r. Howard was born on the 27th of 
July, 1803, in a village twenty-one miles north of the old City of London. 
At the age of nine he was sent to a boarding-school in the town of Hertford, 
where he remained five years. \Vhen fifteen years old he went to sea as a 
boy before the mast, and served for two years; but was then compelled to 
give up a sailor's life owing to _an incurable liability to sea-sickness-a 
complaint to which he has ever since been a martyr when crossing the 
ocean. The time he had spent at sea had not, however, been lost, as he 




 


7 0 


Biographical No#ces. 


had devoted considerable time to the study of navigation and practical 
geometry and marine surveying. These mathematical studies probably 
determined his future career, for on abandoning a seafaring life he turned 
his attention to land surveying, engineering and architecture, and entered 
the office of his uncle, a contractor, living at Kennington Cross. Subse- 
quently he studied under Mr. John Grayson, architect, Banner Street, St. 
Luke's, London, and on leaving Mr. Grayson, went on a professional tour 
through the County of Kent, where, for a short time, he was employed by 
the architect in charge of the work of rebuilding Leeds Castle, near l\'laid- 
stone. He then entered the office of the Cut bushes, contracting architects, 
l\Iaidstone; but in 1824 he returned to London and was employed by Mr. 
\Villiam Ford, architect, Mark Lane, London, England, who the following 
year married l\'lr. Howard's sister. In 1827 l\Ir. Howard married Miss 
Jemima Frances Meikle. He remained with l\Ir. Ford, who entrusted him 
with several important undertakings, until 183 I, when, the times being bad 
and building operations being at a standstill, he began to look about for a 
more profitable field of labour. Attracted by the glowing accounts given 
by :\1r. Cattermole, agent of the Canada Company, of the opportunities 
offered by that country, he resolved to emigrate thither, intending to settle 
at Goderich, where his wife had relatives. In the spring of 1832 he took 
passage for Quebec, but missed his vessel, and was compelled to wait until 
June, when he embarked on the Emperor Alexander, which, bound for the 
same port, sailed on the 27th. The voyage was an eventful one. At the 
outset, Mr. and Mrs. Howard, who had gone ashore at Gravesend to see 
some relatives, found themselves left behind, but their vessel had only a 
few minutes' start and they were able to catch her. On the third day out, 
the Emperor Alexander ran aground on the Spaniard Bank, off Herne Bay, 
whièh involved a delay of ten hours. On the same day Mr. Howard was 
all but knocked overboard by the boom suddenly jibbing, and was only just 
saved in time by the captain. From this day out his daily record during 
the voyage was one of sea-sickness and wretchedness. On the 2nd of July, 
at Ryde, Isle of \Vight, he was again left behind by the ship, but as the 
captain was one of the derelict party the mistake was speedily rectified. 
Two days later, another party, including Mr. Howard, left the ship in a 
small boat to shoot, but a breeze springing up they were horrified to find 
that the ship had olltsailed them and was five miles away. The breeze 
freshened, the boat sprung a leak, and the terrified occupants gave them- 
selves up for lost, for the ship was now fifteen miles off and they were a 
hundred miles from land. Fortunately, the gale abated, and the ship, 
observing their signals, put about and took them aboard just at nightfall. 



City of Toronto. 


71 


Five days in bed was the penalty the sportsmen had to pay for their 
venturesomeness. But for all this another party underwent an exactly 
similar experience a few days later, and were only rescued after eighteen 
hours' exposure. On the twenty-eighth day out, a mutiny occurred, but was 
promptly suppressed. On the loth of August the ship was all but run 
ashore on the Bird Islands, owing to the drunken incapacity of the captain 
and first mate, and on the Isth, during the absence of the captain ashore, a 
mutiny on a small scale occurred a
ong the steerage passengers. Finally 
Quebec was reached on the 29th of August, after a passage of nine weeks 
and three days. Cholera was at this time prevalent at Quebec, and while 
attending the funeral of a child, who had died on board on the day on 
which the voyage terminated, 1Ir. Howard contracted the disease in a mild 
form. His description of the scene in the cholera burying ground is not an 
attractive one. " vVe were obliged," he says, " to wait several hours for a 
priest. There was no less than seven or eight waggons with rough deal 
coffins waiting in the hot sun for the said priest. The coffins were nailed 
together, of unseasoned inch boards, the lids had shrunk and warped, so 
that you could get your hand in, and the stench from them was dreadful." 
On the 4th Mr. Howard started by steamboat for Montreal, where he 
arrived the next day. The journey from -Montreal to York was made by 
coach as far as Cornwall, and the rest of the way by steamboat-the entire 
trip taking six days, making eleven weeks and three days from London. 
On the arrival of J\Ir. and Mrs. Howard at York an incident occurred which 
completely changed their plans. "Going up Church Street from the land- 
ing, I was very much astonished to see in a huckster's window a very 
handsome carving-knife and fork for sale of which I had made my brother- 
in-law a present before they left England. Going into the shop, judge 
of my surprise to find my wife's sister, whom I believed to be in Goderich." 
Mr. Howard had agreed to take apartments with a fellow-traveller, but as 
they could not be secured until the spring, he and his wife had to content 
themselves for the winter with an attic room and kitchen. And a very hard 
winter they put in. Before taking possession of his new quarters, J\Ir. 
Howard went with his brother-in-law to Hamilton, where he met a gentleman 
who informed him that the Honourable Peter Robinson had requested that 
the first archttect who arnved at Hamilton should be sent to York. From 
this gentleman Mr. Howard obtained a letter of introduction to Mr. Robin- 
son, but this letter was not delivered until the spring. From Hamilton J\Ir. 
Howard started for Goderich, but did not - succeed in getting any farther 
than Paris. At this time there were only two houses in Paris, a tavern 
and a large farm house, the latter belonging to a Mr. Capon. \Vith this 



7 2 


Biographical Notices. 


gentleman Mr. Howard agreed to layout the land for a village, taking a 
town lot of five acres in part payment for his professional services. But 
the food and lodging proved to be so bad that he was compelled to throw 
up the contract and to return to Hamilton, and thence to York. On the 
advice of a friend Mr. Howard delayed presenting his letter of introduction 
to Mr. Robinson until he should be able to submit some specimen of his 
abilities as a draughtsman. Accordingly.. he set to work in a cheerless attic, 
without any fire, and with only such light as was afforded by a sky-light, 
which during the greater part of the time was covered with snow. One 
can imagine what the sufferings of this heroic couple during the long winter 
must have been. However, 'Mr. Howard worked on bravely, and produced 
a series of designs for log houses, frame buildings, brick buildings, churches, 
villas, hotels, and rows of stores. 'Vith these he waited on l\1:r. Robinson 
about the middle of March; but finding his expected patron engaged, he 
left the drawings and the letter of introduction, and said he would call again 
in a week. At the time appointed the luckless architect called once more, 
only to find that the roll of drawings had not been opened. Then a scene 
occurred, which Mr. Howard shall himself describe: "I told him (Mr. 
Robinson) that I had been given to understand that a professional emigrant 
visiting Canada would receive the kindest attention from the Government 
employés, and that while drawing those plans I had sat in a garret for a 
month, without any fire, and only lighted from a skylight in the roof, often- 
times covered with snow, and that my wife had read to me; but I suppose 
he had read the story of the Boy and the Frogs-it was fun to him, but 
death to us. He turned pale, and said: 'I am very sorry, l\Ir. Howard; 
but if you knew how I have been worried with business, you would not 
blame me.' 'That is quite sufficient, sir, and I am sorry for what I have 
said,' and we shook hands. He then wrote a letter to Co!. Rowen, the 
Governor's private secretary, asking him. to lay the drawings on the 
Governor's drawing-room table, as His Excellency was going to have a 
party that night." This was done, and the result of the little stratagem 
was that next morning l\1r. Howard received a summons to the Government 
House. He was most kindly received by Sir John Colborne, who compli- 
mented him upon the drawings, and asked permission to enter them in the 
competition which was shortly to take place for the position- of drawing- 
master at Upper' Canada College, for which there were already six appli- 
cants. Mr. Howard consented, although he had not prepared the drawings 
with the care he would have bestowed upon them had he known they were 
to be entered for a competition, and the result justified his Excellency's 
anticipations. Towards the latter end of March, l\Ir. Howard received a 



City of Toronto. 


73 


notification that the appointment had been awarded to him, and that he 
would be required to enter upon his new duties on the first day of April, 
18 33. The salary attached to the position was one hundred pounds sterling 
per annum, and the hours of attendance were three hours a day for four 
days in the week. Mr. Howard was permitted to carryon his professional 
. work at the college in order to give his pupils an opportunity of acquainting 
themselves with the details of this particular branch of the art. In connec- 
tion with his position at Upper Canada College, Mr. Howard relates an 
incident which is worth reproducing, as giving an insight into Sir J04n 
Colborne's domestic relations. "I had," he says, "as pupils, three of his 
Excellency's sons. His Excellency was very kind, and used to come to 
my room to see the boys at work. He said he wished me not to make any 
difference because they were the Governor's sons; but to chastise them the 
same as the other boys, if necessary. The eldest son began to show his 
temper; but his father said he need not show his temper, for he meant what 
he said. I told his Excellency that I felt sure there would be no necessity 
for anything of the kind, as they were young gentlemen, and would always 
be treated as such by me." But the drawing-mastership at Upper Canada 
College was not the only benefit that accrued to the disheartened architect 
from the exhibition of his designs at the Government House reception. 
Several gentlemen who had seen them, among them Dr. Widmer, Mr. 
James G. Chewett, and the Lord Bishop Stewart of Quebec, visited Mr. 
Howard and gave him orders for designs for church buildings. The story 
of the visit of the Bishop of Quebec is amusing: "His lordship called to 
pay his respects to Mrs. Howard, who was busy washing in one corner of a 
large kitchen. She took her hands out of the wash-tub, and the bishop 
shook hands with her, remarking that her small hands had never been used 
to that kind of work, and that if the ladies when they came to Canada 
would unbend as she had done, and, when necessary, perform such work, 
Canada would have a better name than she has now got." The tide had 
now turned, and the despairing emigrant found himself on the high road to 
prosperity. Orders came in rapidly, and during the remainder of this year 
Mr. Howard had his hands full. He built Dr. Widmer's cottage on Front 
Street, Thomas Mercer Jones' villa on York and Front Streets, Chewett's 
Buildings, and the British Coffee House-the latter on the part of the 
site now occupied by the Rossin House. He also erected the two lodges 
at the Queen Street entrance to the College Avenue, one of which was 
demolished in 1882. During the second year of Mr. Howard's residence in 
Canada, 1834, the year of the incorporation of the City of Toronto, he was 



74 


Biographzcal Notices. 


appointed by the ::\1ayor, William Lyon Mackenzie, to the position of City 
Surveyor, and in this capacity he laid down the first side-walks in the city, 
consisting of two twelve-inch planks placed side by side longitudinally. 
He also gained the premium of -{30 for laying out the Market Block. 
Having practised as a land surveyor in England, Mr. Howard was desirous 
of adding that business to his practice as an architect, but found to his 
disgust that he could not do so without a license, and such a license was 
only obtainable after serving six months with a provincial land surveyor. 
Accordingly he made an arrangement with Mr. James G. Chewett, head 
draughtsman in the Crown Lands Department, under whom he was 
employed to make a survey of the harbour and peninsula. Subsequently 
he passed his examination, gave -{ 500 security to the Government, and on 
the 26th of January, 1836, received his license as a provincial land sur- 
veyor. In 1835 and 1836 :Mr. Howard's business had increased rapidly, for 
he drew plans and specifications, and let the contracts for twelve private 
dwelling houses and a number of stores, besides the fire hall and bell tower 
on Church Street. The following year he was in a position to build a 
private residence for himself-Colborne Lodge, High Park-and this only 
four years after he had despairingly worked in his fireless garret at the 
designs which were to bring him name and fame. During this year, too, 
in addition to work for private parties, he gained the premium of {45 for 
the approved plan of the court-house and jail. This was the year of the 
Rebellion, and on the celebrated Thursday, the 7th of December, we find 
l'vIr. Howard leading the right wing of the scouting party sent up Yonge 
Street to reconnoitre the rebels congregated at Montgomery's tavern. With 
the close of the year Mr. Howard retired upon his laurels, and removed, on 
the 23rd December, from Chewett's Buildings to his new residence at High 
Park. He records the (act that on the morning of Christmas Day he shot 
a deer and some quail in the rear portion of the Park, near Bloor Street. 
During 1838 Mr. Howard was engaged, as City Engineer, in superintending 
the construction of various municipal works, and was also employed by 
the Lieutenant-Governor, Sir George Arthur, to make alterations in and 
additions to the Government House and to build a new ball-room. He 
also received from Sir George his commission as Lieutenant in the Fourth 
Regiment of West York Militia, in recognition of his services on the occa- 
sion of the Montgomery's tavern affair. After the fire of the following year 
(1839), by which the church of St. James was destroyed, Mr. Howard was 
called upon to report upon the condition of the ruins. But the crowning 
triumph of his career was obtained in 1840, when he was awarded the 



City of Toronto. 


75 


premium of -j; 30 for the approved plan of the Provincial Lunatic Asylum. 
This success doubtless had the effect of spreading his reputation throughout 
the country, for during the next few years we find him superintending the 
erection of the court-house and jail at Peter borough and a new church at 
Chippewa; designing the alterations in Niagara church; building a new 
court-house and jail at Brockville; preparing plans for a jail and court- 
house for the Johnston district; erecting a new bridge-his own patent-at 
Bronte; drawing plans, etc., for a new jail and court-house at Perth; 
building a stone church for the Indians at Tyendinaga; drawing plans for 
houses for the Indians at Owen Sound; receiving the first premium of -j; 50 
for the approved plan for Queen's College, Kingston; preparing the designs 
for Lennoxville College, for a large school-house at Quebec, and for 
churches at Lloydtown and Streetsville; building a church for the Indians 
on Manitoulin Island; making designs 
nd estimates for and building 
churches and school-houses on Snake and vValpole Islands; building a 
branch of the Commercial Bank of Toronto at Hamilton; drawing plans 
and specifications for a new church at N ewmarket; preparing several 
designs for Brock's l\:Ionument, to be erected on Queenston Heights; taking 
the first prize and receiving instructions for the construction of a new 
market-house at Kingston; building St. John's Church at York Mills; 
drawing plans and specifications for a new court-house at Belleville; for 
houses for the Indians at Saugeen; designing and erecting a branch bank 
at Hamilton and numerous private residences in various provincial towns. 
The vast extent of the business carried on at this time by Mr. Howard may 
be judged from the fact that the above operations were merely those under- 
taken by him outside the city during a period of six years; and that, 
compared with his undertakings at Toronto, all this was little or nothing. 
Yet, with this immense mass of business on his hands, he was in 1841 enabled 
to extend his sphere of operations, having received a license to practise as 
notary public. He was also engaged to some extent in arbitrations. Thus, 
in the year last named, he went to Kingston to settle the Duffil-McLeod 
building contracts, and the following year acted as arbitrator in settling 
the dispute hetween the Farmers' Bank and John Ritchey, builder. Among 
the public works undertaken by 1\1r. Howard in Toronto at this period, 
and carried to a successful completion, were the following: Erection of 
the spire of St, Paul's Church, Y orkville, 1841 ; swing bridge at the Hum- 
ber; plans and specifications for the waterworks, Toronto; laying out 
St. James' Cemetery; plans for a theatre in rear of 103 and 105 King 
Street, 1842; building a post-office on vVellington Street; constructing 



76 


Biog raþhzcal Notzees. 


a main sewer and macadamising York Street from King to Wellington 
Street; laying out the grounds in front of Osgoode Hall; preparing 
designs for the Commercial Bank buildiIig, 1843; designing a Masonic 
hall and arcade from Wellington to Front Streets, 1844; designing and 
building the Bank of British North America, on the corner of Y onge 
and Wellington Streets; drawing plans and specifications of main sewers 
on King and Church Streets, 1845. And all this, it should be borne in mind, 
was in addition to Mr. Howard's every-day duties as City Engineer- 
repairing streets, constructing new drains and culverts, levelling for side 
paths, laying out building lots, giving the levels for City buildings and 
settling accounts. Truly the man was indefatigable. It may be noted 
here, before passing on any further, that it was about this time, namely in 
18 4 2 , that the first white brick building in the city was erected, Mr. Howard 
being the builder. The entry in his journal, date April the 1st, 1842, is as 
follows: "Built two stores on King Street, Nos. 103 and 105, with German 
silver sashes and plate glass. No. 103 was built with the first white brick 
that was used in the city. I gave the brick-maker [60 for twenty thousand. 
They were made from the clay on Y onge Street, off Mr. Sheriff Jarvis's lot 
at Rosedale, by a man named Craig, who had some trouble in keeping the 
clay separate." In 1846 Mr. Howard was engaged in extensive surveys 
of the peninsula-the Island we call it now-and the Harbour. It seems 
strange to hear of the Island being laid out in streets, yet this was what 
was done. Mr. Howard laid out two hundred and eighty-three acres in 
fifty-seven two-acre lots "on Trafalgar Street, Marine Parade, on Fitzroy 
Street, going north from the lighthouse, Vernon Street, at right angles to 
it, and Rodney and Duncan Streets." It v..-ill be noticed that the names of 
all these streets, with the exception of the first two, are those of celebrated 
British admirals. Later on in the year, l\lr. Howard made an accurate 
survey of the sand ridges bounding Toronto Harbour and Ashbridge's Bay. 
But a more important work in this connection was that which he undertook 
in conse
uence of a communication from the Hon. F. Bonthillier, of the 
Crown Lands Department, requesting him to make a survey and plan of 
Toronto Harbour, showing the best method of constructing an esplanade 
and docking on the north side thereof, and taking several lines of soundings 
running out from the water's edge at the ends of the different streets and 
wharves for a distance of ten chains into the bay, and from such other 
points which might be deemed necessary to perfect the undertaking. The 
work. was commenced on the 2nd of May and was completed on the 23rd of 
the same month, one thousand six hundred and thirty-eight soundings in all 



City of Toronto. 


77 


having been taken. In this year Mr. Howard, in addition to his usual 
. amount of private work within the city, prepared plans and specifications 
for a large house, to cost -[3,000, to be erected in Quebec, and for the 
Toronto House of Industry, no charge being made in the latter case for the 
work done. He also built for himself, on York Street, a white brick front 
dwelling house, which he subsequently sold to the Rossin, which became 
part of the Rossin House. During the following year Mr. Ho\
ard made 
further surveys in connection with the harbour, viz.: of Ashbridge's Bay, 
and built two bridges; also of the eastern strip of land (now the marsh) 
which divides it from Toronto Harbour; of the northern side of the peninsula 
to the western point opposite the Queen's Wharf; and another survey of 
the same from Knott's House to the lighthouse, and from thence to the 
lake on the west side of the lighthouse. He also made a survey of the 
River Don from the bridge on King Street to the rear of the first concession 
of the Township of York. Another triumph of his constructive art was 
achieved this year in the erection, on Front Street, of a large brewery and 
malthouse, the principal walls of which were built of stone in caissons 
sunk in six feet of water. About this time Mr. Howard became interested 
in Lake Huron copper mines, becoming president of a company formed 
for the purpose of working a mine on Serpent River. He made a survey 
of the Island of St. Joseph in this district, and located the town of Hilton. 
Thorough business man as he was, Mr. Howard yet found leisure to cultivate 
the fine arts. In the" Catalogue of the First Exhibition of the Society or" 
Artists and Amateurs of Toronto, 1834," we find him mentioned as a mem- 
ber of the committee; and on glancing through the pages of the brochure, 
we came across his name again and again as the exhibitor of no less than 
eighteen paintings and designs. Mrs. Howard, too, appears to have shared 
her husband's artistic tastes, for appended to the catalogue is a copy of a 
letter to that lady from the Hoc.orary Secretary of the association, express- 
ing a hope that she might be induced to exhibit a few of her paintings or 
drawings. In 1847 :!\If. Howard was elected Vice-President and Treasurer 
of the newly formed Toronto Society-the successor of the Society of Artists 
and Amateurs-at whose first exhibition, in that year, he made over a score 
of exhibits. During 1848 and the two following years IVlr. Howard designed 
a temporary Lunatic Asylum for use pending the completion of the s
ruc- 
ture which exists at the present day, and the corner-stone of which had 
been laid by Chief Justice Robinson on the 22nd of August, 1846. He also 
designed St. George's Church, John Street, and constructed the spire of the 
old St. Andrew's Church, on the corner of Church and Adelaide Streets. 



78 


Biograpllical Notices. 


He received the contract for measuring the locks of the \Velland Canål 
and estimating the extra cost, above contract price, of the stone work in 
the new locks. He surveyed and laid down an extra line of pipes for the 
waterworks, extending from the engine-house up Peter Street to the Reser- 
voir, and surveyed and drew a plan of part of the city, showing the position 
of the mains, hydrants and service pipes, for A. Furnes-all this, as before, 
in addition to work for private parties and to his duties as City Engineer. 
In 1851 and 18 5 2 our indefatigable architect and surveyor was, among his 
other multifarious duties, engaged in surveying the Garrison Common for 
the Ordnance Department, the latter having agreed to grant the city two 
hundred and seventy-eight acres to be converted into a park, provided the 
City Corporation would agree to clear and fence it. As City Engineer Mr. 
Howard made a plan of the proposed park and drew up the estimate of 
cost, [450; but owing to the unwillingness of the eastern members of the 
Council to agree to this outlay, the scheme fell through. \Vith the excep- 
tion of the survey of the Government Creek, this was the last public work 
Mr. Howard was destined to undertake for some time. For twenty years 
he had laboured incessantly with a success such as It has been given to few 
men to achieve. But now the wearied brain cried out for rest, and Mr. 
Howard's medical adviser ordered him off to Europe. On the. first of May, 
1853, Mr. Howard, accompanied by his wife and a son of l\'1r. Rowsell, the 
printer, sailed from New York on the Cunard steamship Arabia for Liver- 
pool. No sooner had the steamer got to sea than he was attacked by his 
old enemy, sea-sickness. There was a touch of humour in the sufferer's 
description of the manner in which he struggled with his foe. He says: 
"Dr. \Vidmer had advised me to take gruel in case of sea-sickness; but a 
gentleman on board recommended champagne. The wine was the easiest 
to get on board, and we all took it. It turned like pyroligneous acid on my 
stomach and made me much worse. A Scotch gentleman-Mr. Mackenzie 
-a passenger, recommended a glass of water with a teaspoonful of raw oat- 
meal in it three times a-day. This I took for eight days until we arrived at 
Liverpoo1." The party arrived in London just seventeen days after leaving 
Toronto; rather a contrast to the eleven weeks and three days from London 
to Little York twenty-one years before. \Vhile in the English metropolis 
Mr. Howard was generally fêted by the profession, dining with Sir Charles 
Barry, the architect of the Parliament Houses at \Vestminster, and with 
the Skinners' Company. However, his physician soon ordered him away 
from the gaieties of London, and after a brief stay in the Isle of \Vight, he 
visited Paris, and subsequently made a tour of some of the English counties. 



City of Toro1lto. 


79 


On the 7th September he sailed for New York, and reached Toronto on the 
26th of the same month, his health having been greatly improved by his 
holiday. Soon after his return, in October, Mr. Howard received instruc- 
tions from the City Council to survey and locate, in conjunction with the 
Honourable Mr. Seymour, Engineer for the Northern Railway, the line of 
that road along the Esplanade, and to take it up the Government Creek, 
following the curves of the creek until the summit level should be gained. 
It will be remembered that the manner in which this Esplanade contract 
was subsequently let caused a great deal of dissatisfaction among the 
citizens. In January, 1853, Mr. Howard was appointed Associate Judge, 
as will be seen by the following letter :- 


SHERIFF'S OFFICE: 
UNITED COUNTIES YORK, ONTARIO AND PEEL, 
27th December, 1852. 
SIR,-I have the honour to inform you that your name is included in 
the Commission of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery to be 
holden at Toronto in and for the said United Counties, on Thursday, the 
6th day of January, 1853, on which day said Commission will. be openly 
read. I have the honour to be, sir, 
Your obedient servant, 
W. B. JARVIS, 
John G. Howard, Esq. Sheriff. 


Mr. Howard attended the Sessions for four years, and sat on the Bench with 
Chief Justice Robinson, and Judges l\IcLean and Richards. On the 30th of 
May, 1855, the Hon. Geo. W. Allan, Mayor, and the members of the Board 
of vVorks appointed a Mr. Kingsford, of Quebec, a great politician, as City 
Surveyor in Mr. Howard.s place, after the latter had served the city faith- 
fully for eighteen years. However 
Ir. Kingsford was dismissed at the end 
of the year. A majority of the aldermen and councilmen promised to 
reinstate Mr. Howard as City Engineer in 1856, but he declined on account 
of his health. On the 22nd of September, 1855, Mr. Howard made arrange- 
ments with Marquis Rossin to act as consulting architect and engineer, 
and to thoroughly inspect the whole of the works as they progressed in the 
erection of the Rossin House, and to certify all accounts as the works pro- 
gressed. In March, 1856, he resigned his situation as drawing-master at 
Upper Canada College, after twenty-three years' service. Since Mr. 
Howard's retirement from city business, in 1857, he has amused himself by 
collecting works of art, which he has since donated to the city of Toronto, 
and has erected a gallery for their reception. There are one hundred and 
twenty-seven pictures, all handsomely framed and glazed. He has also 



80 


Bz'ographz'cal Notices. 


given to the Public Library a very handsome donation in the shape of some 
hundreds of volumes, among which are the following :- 
61 Volumes............. Illustrated London News. 
34 . . . . . . . . . . . . The Builder. 
18 . . . . . . . . . . . . Canadian Illustrated News. 
6 . . . . . . . . . . . . Ballou's Pictorial. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . Picturesque Amenca. 
4 . . . . . . . . . . . . Art Journal. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . Illustrations of Piedmont and Italy. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . I' Canadian Scenery. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . " American Scenery. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . " Switzerland. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . " Scotland. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . Finderis' Ports and Harbours of Great Britain. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . Antiquities of Ireland. 
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . History of Wales. 
3 .... . ... .... Claude's Liber Veritatis, folio, (a copy valued 
in London at .:650). 
. . . . . . . . . . . . Turner Gallery, folio. 
. . . . . . . . . . . . Allibone's Dictionary of Authors. 
. . . . . . . . . . . . Graphic. 
. . . . . . . . . . . . Illustrated Times. 
. . . . . . . . . . . . Scientific American. 
.. .. .. .... . Weekly Globe. 


3 
3 
18 
16 
34 
4 


" 


" 


" 


" 


" 


" 


222 
As Forest Ranger for High Park for the last ten years, Mr. Howard has 
been kept busy in laying out roads, underbushing the land, drawing plans 
and specifications, and superintending the erection of pavilions and other 
necessary buildings, for which services he receives one dollar per annum. 
These buildings were necessary for the convenience of pic-nic parties visit- 
ing High Park. He has also made plans and specifications for a platform 
and shelter for passengers visiting High Park by rail at the eastern entrance 
of the park, and has paid one hundred dollars out of his own pocket towards 
its erection in order to induce the Corporation to maintain it. He also has 
plans and specifications prepared for a canal and wharf or pier, six hundred 
feet long, into ten feet water, in front of the said eastern entrance. Mr. 
. Howard's tomb, of which we give a view, was erected in 1874 and 1875, in 
memory of his wife and in readiness for himself. The cairn is constructed 
with granite boulders. Mrs. Howard was a Scotch lady, which accounts 
for the cairn. Mr. Howard was a Masonic Knight Templar, therefore 
the double pedestal terminating with the Maltese cross. The consecrated 
ground on which it stands is enclosed with some of the old iron railing 
which surrounded St. Paul's Cathedral, London, England, for one hundred 






 
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City of Toronto. 


81 


and sixty years. The vicissitudes of the railing were curious. After its 
removal from St. Paul's it was purchased by Mr. Robert Mountcastle, of 
St. John's \Vood, London, of Mr. J. B. Hogarth, iron merchant, London, 
and shipped by him in good condition, on board the steamship Delta, for 
Toronto, 14th October, 1874. The Delta went ashore five miles below 
Cape Chat light, on 8th Novèmber. A portion of the railing was recovered 
from the wreck, and sent to Montreal in a mutilated state by the salvage 
men. Mr. Howard bought it and shipped it to TOl=onto, where it arrived 
21st AlJ.gust, 1875. After having been repaired by Messrs. \V. Hamilton 
& Son, of the St. Lawrence Foundry, it was finally fixed on the stone curb 
where it now stands, on 18th November, 1875. The cost of erecting 
the tomb, including vault and iron railing, amounted to $3,120. The 
marble pedestal came from the Rutland quarries, Vermont, U.S., and 
weighs over ten tons. Engraved on a brass plate-which is fixed round 
one of the gate-posts of the old iron railing-is the following inscription: 
" Sacred to the memory of John George Howard and Jemima Frances, his 
wife. John George, born 27 th July, 1803. Jemima Frances, born 18th 
August, 1802; died 1st September, 1877, aged seventy-five years." On 
the other gate-post is a brass plate, bearing a characteristic inscription 
having reference to the removal of the old iron railing from St. Paul's 
Cathedral. 


ELIJAH HULL was born in Somersetshire, England, and came to Canada 
in 1855. He followed the vocation of a gardener, and has been seven years 
engaged at the Horticultural Gardens. He is also sexton of St. Peter's 
Church, and resides at the corner of Parliament and Amelia Streets. 


SIMON HUMPHREY, builder, is the youngest son of Smith and Sarah 
(Greenwood) Humphrey, and was born in the Township of York, in 1821. 
His parents came from Providence, Rhode Island, at the conclusion of the 
\Var of 1812, and settled in Canada, locating on a farm of four hundred 
acres in the 3rd concession of York Township. The family consisted at that 
time of six sons and one daughter, all of whom were born in Providence. Mr._ 
Humphrey, sen'r, with the assistance of his sons, cleared the land, and in, 
connection with his farming worked at his trade of carpenter, and in 1827 
erected a saw mill on the River Don, which he operated until his death, in 
1832. Previous to his demise he had removed to Toronto, and, renting a 
house on the corner of Wellington and Bay Streets, worked at his trade, two 
of his sons occupying the farm. Simon, the subject of this notice, when 
eight years of age commenced to attend a school at Toronto, kept by Mr, 
7 



82 


Bzographical NotÙ:es. 


S. E. Taylor, and afterwards learned the trade of builder with his brother- 
in-law, Robert James; and on completing his term of apprenticeship started 
business for himself, which he has ever since continued. 


ISAAC HUTCHINSON was born in York, Feqruary. 1824, being the son of 
Isaac Hutchinson; his mother was a daughter of John Charlton, of Cum- 
berland, England. Mr. Hutchinson's parents came to York in 1818, his 
father opening a blacksmith's shop on the corner of Duke and Ontario 
Streets, and also purchased a fifth of an acre of land of what is now 120 Duke 
Street, which became the family residence, where our subject was born, in 
1824. The old stone building, erected in 1819, is still standing, the walls of 
which are two feet thick, the stone being brought from the lake shore, and is 
mentioned in Dr. Scadding's " Toronto of Old." Mr. Hutchinson's father 
carried on blacksmithing until 1832. when he died, leaving three sons and 
three daughters. Our subject was the youngest son, and the only one now 
living of the family. He began his apprenticeship at the age of sixteen as a 
blacksmith, served three years, and then five years as journeyman, after 
which he kept a grocery store for five years on Yonge Street, near Adelaide. 
He then moved out of Toronto for nine years, and on his return engaged in the 
coal and wood business until 1880. He belongs to the J\lethodist Church. 
In politics he is a Reformer. His wife was a daughter of John Barron, 
from Cumberland, England, by whom he had seven sons and four daugh- 
ters. In 1835 Mr. Hutchinson and his brother were engaged in burning 
charcoal for blacksmithing, on the present site of Carleton Street. 


PETER HUTTY, deceased, was born at Cottingham, near Hull, Yorkshire, 
England, in 1819, being the only son of a family of four children, born to 
Joseph and Mary (Smith) Hutty. His father died in Montreal soon after 
they arrived, and his mother then came to York. He went on the farm of 
his maternal grandfather, Wm. Smith, who had emigrated from Yorkshire, 
England, and settled near B
ampton. 1. A. Smith was a son of his, who 
kept the Yorkshire House here for many years. He remained with his 
grandfather until he was seventeen years of age. In 1836 he came to 
Toronto, and engaged in a business in St. Lawrence :\larket, where he 
remained many years, carrying on a large business, and engaging in Govern- 
ment contracts. In 1839 he married Margaret, second daughter of John 
Gray, who was born in York in 1796. By his marriage he had a large 
family of sons and daughters, most of them living at his death in 1882; 
they were educated and brought up at the family residence, corner Y onge 
and Cottingham Streets, which street he named after his native place. For 



City of Toro1lto. 


83 


fourteen years 1\1r. Hutty held a seat in the Yorkville Council,_ two or three 
of which he was reeve, during which he introduced, and carried against 
much opposition, the erection of the Town Hall, the Public School, and 
allowing the street railroad to cross Bloor Street, all of which proved of 
great advantage to the people of Y orkville. He was a Justice of the Peace 
for several years. In politics he was a Conservative. Of a noble, generous 
disposition, he was respected by all who knew him. 


PATRICK HYNES is the youngest son of Patrick Hynes and Frances 
(Bergin) Hynes, who settled with his family in York (now Toronto) in 1831, 
and was born in the County Tipperary, Ireland, l'v1ay 1st, 1830. His father was 
a contractor and builder and carried on that business in Toronto until his 
death in 1857. The subject of this sketch was educated at St. Michael's 
College, Clover Hill, Toronto, and in early life followed the business of his 
father. The elaborate plaster work in Osgoode Hall is a tribute to his 
skill and workmanship. In 1863 he was elected Alderman for St. DavId's 
Ward, which then comprised St. David's and St. Thomas' \Vards of the 
present day. He represented that ward for ten consecutive years, when he 
resigned to accept the position of one of a special commission to value the 
city. In 1864 he was appointed an officer in the Post-office Department of 
the Civil Service, which position he has since held. He is the Captain 
of No. 6 Company of the reserved -Militia (east Toronto). Mr. Hynes 
has been twice married; in 1861 to Ellen Augusta, daughter of Cornelius 
Spilling and Annie Skelly; and in 1870 to Kate Jane, youngest daughter of 
William Kingsley and Ellen Minelian. By the former wife he has had 
three, and by the latter six, children, viz.: by the first, Michael Edward; 
Ellen Augusta; William Gilbert; by the second, Katie Frances; Charles 
Patrick; Frank Kingsley; Florence; Aileen and Mary Nora; all of whom 
still survive, except Ellen Augusta, who died in her first year. In politics 
Mr. Hynes is a Conservative, and in religion a Roman Catholic. He is a 
York Pioneer. 


\VILLIAM HYNES was born in Queen's County, Ireland, in '1827. In 
r831 he came to Canada with his parents and family who settled in Toronto 
(then Little York). \Villiam commenced to work at the age of ten years, 
and in due time started business for himself as contràctor, which he has 
since continued. He married lYIay Spilling, daughter of Cornelius Spilling, . 
by whom he had the following children, four daughters and three sons: 
May Frances; Annie; Nellie and Lillie; P. William; John Francis and 
Alfred William Bergin. Mr. Hynes resides at 157 Wilton Avenue. 



84 


Biographical Notices. 


JEREMIAH IREDALE was born in Yorkshire, England, in I822. He came 
to Toronto in 1832, with his father, who established himself in business as a 
glazier and painter. After remaining with his father for some time he 
entered the service of Ross, McLeod & Co., dry-goods merchants; A. Lawrie 
& Co., and others. He afterwards worked for Hon. J. H. Dunn, Receiver- 
General, and for Shaw, Turnbull & Co., dry-goods merchants. For the past 
fifteen years he has been in the employ of J. Fleming, 356 Y onge Street, and 
is now engaged in the same place. Mr. Iredale was a member of the old 
fire company, of which his brother John was captain. 


SAMUEL IREDALE, retired, was born in Keswick, Cumberland, England, 
in 1807, his parents being James and Jane (Shaw) Iredale; his grandfather 
was Jeremiah Iredale, of Manningham, England. In 1819 his father came 
to Canada with his family and settled in Toronto, at the corner of Queen and 
Bay Streets, in a building which his son John had built on the lot, and which 
is still standing. By trade he was a plumber and glazier; after he came out 
here he worked at tinsmithing, which business he carried on until his death, 
December 18th, 1845. Ishmael Iredale came to Canada in 1825, and learned 
the tin trade with his brother; he then went to work for Hiram Piper, with 
whom he stayed for twenty-three years. He then began tin business for 
himself on Y onge Street, near Trinity Square, retiring about seven years ago 
Mr. Iredale served in the fire brigade for thirty-eight years; he is a Reformer 
and a member of the Church of England. On July 9th he married Elizabeth 
Burns, fourth daughter of Thomas Burns, who had come from Yorkshire, 
England; by her he had four sons and five daughters; only two sons are now 
living, one of whom keeps a tin shop on the corner of Queen and Bay 
Streets. He has a sister living who is ninety-four years of age. 


., 


\VILLIAM IREDALE, retired, was born in Yorkshire, England, m 1826, . 
being the fourth son of William and Grace (Hollinrake) Iredale. In 1832 
he came to Canada with his parents. His father, who had been a plumber 
and glazier in England, engaged in the tin business when he settled in 
Toronto, and continued in that line until his death in 1865. The subject 
of this sketch was engaged in the last manufacturing business, up to March, 
1879, then having lost an arm by being caught with a belt and thrown 
round a shaft in his factory, on Sheppard Street, he retired; his son now 
attends to the business. In 1849 he married Rachael, daughter of William 
Daniel. Mr. Iredale was a member of the old fire brigade. In religion he 
is a Methodist, and in politics a Reformer. 



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Cz'ty of Toronto. 


85 


ALDERMAN JOHN IRWIN was born in Ireland, between Vetrinam and 
Leitrim, in 1824, and is the eldest son of \Villiam and l'v1artha Irwin. In 
1850 he sailed for New York, where he remained a short time, finally com- 
ing to Canada and locating in Toronto for a short period. After spending 
. four years in Quebec he returned to Toronto, where he has since resided. 
For fifteen years he was proprietor of the General Wolfe Hotel, on the 
corner of Church and King Streets, and was also engaged in farming eight 
years, ten miles out of the city. H
 was the first man to hitch a horse to a 
steam fire engine, having had a contract to furnish the horses for the fire- 
engines for eighteen years. lYIr. Irwin has been in the City Council the last 
five years, and for the last eight years has been living retired. He is a 
large property owner. In 1856 lYIr. Irwin was married to Jane Henry, 
daughter of John Henry, by whom he has had two children. 


JOHN JACQUES, Beverley Street, one of the founders of the manufacturing 
firm of Jacques & Hay, was born in Cumberland, England, in "the year 
1804. His father, Thomas Jacques, was educated for the Church, but 
he entertained conscientious scruples about signing the Thirty-nine Articles 
of Faith, and being possessed of remarkable skill in mathematics, he 
became a teacher in Carlisle, and after a successful career retired to the 
country, where he died, leaving six children. The subject of our memoir 
was then but six years old. He learned the cabinet-making business in 
Wigton, but early in life went to London and acquired a knowledge of his 
trade which served him so well in after years. In 1831 he embarked for 
New York with his mother and sisters, and after a short stay in that city 
moved to what was then York, the capital of Upper Canada. His first 
employer failed and left him in debt. He was next employed by the late 
Mr
 Thomas Gilbert, who long resided on the corner of Bay and Adelaide 
Streets, after which he entered the service of a Mr. Maxwell, who, after a 
time, proposed that he should purchase his business. While on the way 
home from the shop one night he met Mr. Robert Hay, and proposed the 
partnership which was eventually accepted and the business taken in hand. 
Subsequently they erected two stores west of the Telegram Office, which in 
course of time proved to be too small for their large increase of business. 
They moved (their shop to Front Street, its present site, in 1847. The 
business gradually increased until they not only supplied all Canada but 
built up a large trade with England and other foreign countries. In 
1854 and 1856 they suffered loss by fire of over two hundred thousand 
dollars, almost all they possessed. They soon, however, rebuilt their works 
upon a larger scale, and the business grew to its present great dimensions. 



86 


Bz.og-raphical Notices. 


The partnership continued from 1838 to 1872, when Mr. Jacques retired 
with an ample fortune, which he has since considerably increased by judi- 
cious investments. In politics he has always been a stroÐg Reformer, in 
religion a member of St. Andrew's Church. He is a member of the St. 
George's Society, and a Director of the National Investment Company. He 
has only one child, the wife of lYIr. John Stewart, of Hamilton, President of 
the Bank of Hamilton, and of the Hamilton and North-Western Railway. 
Since 1872, Mr. Jacques has lived a quiet life, enjoying the fruits of his toil. 


ROBERT JAFFRAY was the third son of \Villiam and Margaret (Heugh) 
Jaffray; born at Bannockburn, Scotland, 1832, near which was his father's 
farm, where he passed his early life. \\Then twelve years of age, by the death 
of his father, he was thrown upon his own resources. After attending 
school at Stirling until the age of fifteen he entered the service, as an 
apprentice, of J. R. Dymock, grocer and wine merchant, Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, where he remained for five years, at the expiration of which time he 
came to Canada, arriving in Toronto in the fall of 1852, where he joined 
his brother-in-law, lYIr. J. B. Smith, grocer and wine dealer, being employed 
as his manager. The establishment was situated on the site now occupied 
by J affray & Ryan, corner of Y onge and Louisa Streets, then the most 
northern establishment on Y onge Street. Three years later he became a 
partner, the business being conducted under the name of Smith & Jaffray. 
In 1858 a disastrous fire swept away Mr. Smith's lumber yard and sash 
and door factory, by which they sustained a great loss. Mr. Smith then retired 
from the firm. \\Tith industry, combined with perseverance, which will 
enable a man to overcome difficulties that actually seem in5urmountable 
(and these excellent qualities Mr. Jaffray possessed in an eminent degree), 
he began to work with renewed energy to repair their commercial interests, 
and was ultima,tely rewarded. Under his efficient management prosperity 
crowned his efforts with brilliant success. In 1883 he retired upon a com- 
petency, and the business, which he laboured so long and faithfully to 
establish, passed into the hands of the present firm of Mr. George J affray 
& James Ryan. During the thirty years of Mr. J affray's residence in 
Toronto, besides managing his mercantile interests, he has been identified 
with many public enterprises of great magnitude. His indomitable energy, 
untiring industry, exemplary character; his devoted attention to every 
minute detail in business, and abnegation of self in his studious zeal for the 
interests of those whom he served caused his services to be eagerly sought. 
Under the advice of the late Hon. George Brown, he was appointed by 
the Hon. Alexander Mackenzie Director of the Northern Railroad, in 



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City of Toronto. 


87 


which capacity he served three years in looking after their interests, the 
Government being large creditors of that corporation. From information 
furnished by 1\1r. Jaffray, a Royal Commission was issued by the Govern- 
ment to look into the affairs of the company, which resulted in a satisfactory 
settlement of the then existing claims. He was afterwards chosen a Director 
of the Midland Railway, of which board he is at present an efficient member. 
In 1874 he took an active part in organizing the Toronto House Building 
Society (now the Land Security Company), of which he is Vice- President. He 
is also Director ofthe Toronto Trust Company, Director ofthe Globe Printing 
Company, Director of the Sovereign Insurance Company, Director of the 
North America Life Insurance Company, Director of the Homewood Retreat, 
or Private Asylum for Inebriates and Insane, at Guelph; and Director of the 
Midland and North Shore Lumber Company. He is a member of . the Cale- 
donian and S1. Andrew's Societies. In politics Mr. Jaffray has identified 
himself with the Reform Party, and although solicited to accept nomination 
for civic and parliamentary honours he has declined. In 1860 he married 
Sarah, youngest daughter of John Bugg, by whom he has two sons 
and two daughters. Immediately after the exciting political campaign 
of 1879, one of the most bold and daring attempts on record was made to 
kidnap several of the leading men of the Reform Party for the purpose of 
extorting from them a large ransom. Among these "'ere the late Hon. 
George Brown, Hon. Oliver Mowat and the subject of this sketch. Through 
a chain of circumstances the latter was drawn int
 the snare and taken 
from his residence at night upon a pretended arrest, 1\lr. Jaffray giving 
himself up to his captors on their producing a document purporting to be 
signed by the Hon. Judge \Vilson, acting for the Minister of Justice at 
Ottawa, directing him to be immediately brought to his residence for 
examination, relative to certain charges of a grave character. Our subject 
went with his captors, having no suspicion of foul play; but instead of being 
taken to Judge \Vilson's residence, he was driven to a lonely spot on the 
east side of the Don and Danforth Road where it was intended to imprison 
him in a cave on the bank, which his captors had previously prepared 
for his reception. The cave was discovered by two detectives while 
searching in the neighbourhood where the outrage was committed. They 
found a cavity dug out of the hill on a farm owned by Mr. Playter, which 
was capable of accommodating several persons, under the peculiar circum- 
stances in which they might have been induced to abide in it. Mr. Jaffray, 
on alighting trom the carriage, and finding himself the victim of a nefarious 
plot against his personal liberty, struggled with his captors and managed to 
free himself from them, and awakened the inmates of a house a short 



88 


Biographical Notices. 


distance away, when his abductors made their escape. The officers of the 
law at once made vigorous efforts to solve the mystery, and arrested two 
young men, brothers, Thomas and Ross Deal, who were tried; the former 
was found guilty of committing the outrage, and was sentenced by Judge 
Burton to be confined in the County J ail, at hard labour, for a period of two 
years, and to give bonds for his future good behaviour. His accomplice was 
discharged. And thus ended one of the boldest plots to deprive several 
citizens of their liberty ever recorded in the Province. 


SILAS JAMES, Provincial Land Surveyor, was born in the Township of 
York in 1834, His father was \Villiam James, who was born in the County 
of Tyrone, Ireland, in 1801 ; his mother was born in the Township of York, 
and was a daughter of Thomas Johnson, aU. E. Loyalist. They had ten 
children, Silas being the fourth. \ViUiam James was a Justice of the Peace 
and a member of the District Council; in politics he was a Reformer and 
in religion a Methodist; he died in 1874, his wife having died many years 
previous (1855). Silas James came to Toronto in 1854 and began a course 
of study with Dennison & Bolton, with whom he remained four years. For 
the next five years he was in British Columbia engaged in the milling and 
mining business, then he returned to Toronto. From 1867 till 1874 he was 
County Engineer; he also had charge of the York Roads. From 1874 until 
1880 he was a directot;. of the Toronto House Building Association; he is a 
member of the York Pioneer Society. In 1867 Mr. James married the 
fourth daughter of Richard Sully, of London, Ont., formerly of Notting- 
hamshire, England. 
THOMAS R. JOHNSTONE, flour and feed merchant, was born in Little 
York in 1829, on the present site of tþe Post-office, and is the seventh in a 
family of nine children. His father, John Johnstone, came to Canada from 
Scotland, about 1798, with his father's family. His father carried on the 
business of a butcher and drover until his death in 1834. He left a family 
of four daughters and two sons, as follows: John, living in the United 
States; Thomas R., Almeria, Sarah, dead; Adeline; and Isabela, married 
to T. \V. Gosford, Aurora. l'vIr. Thomas R. Johnstone has been engaged 
in the flour and feed business since 1882. 


CAPTAIN JOHN KEMP, 6 Gerrard Street \Vest, was born on the Canadian 
side of the Niagara River, about three miles from the Town of Niagara
 in 
1802, and was the third son in a family of nine sons and four daughters. 
His father, John Kemp, came from the State of New York in 1783. at the 
close of the Revolutionary \Var; he died in 1834. Captain Kemp remained 



City of Toronto. 


89 


on his father's farm until 1826, when he came to Little York and commenced 
sailing on the lakes. He first sailed as purser with \Vm. Brecket, who ran 
the packet between Kingston, Toronto and Niagara; he afterwards bought 
an interest in the vessel. He navigated the lakes from 1826 until 1873, the 
last boat that he was on being the Paragon, a sailing vessel. He married 
a daughter of George Laird, by whom he has three daughters and two 
sons living. 
JAMES KIDD, deceased, was born in Ireland about 1809, and came to 
Canada in 1826, settling in Toronto, where he remained until his death in 
1844' He was a volunteer during the Rebellion of 1837; and the exposure 
to which he was subjected, acting on a constitution not physically strong 
brought on a complaint from which he never recovered. His wife was Miss 
Catherine Oliver, a native of Ireland also, by whom he had eight children, 
only three of whom are now living. Mrs. Kidd died in 1844, in her eighty- 
third year. John Kidd, the second son of the above, was born in Toronto. 
At an early age he commenced to learn the painting and decorating trade, 
which he still continues to follow. He has been a city tax collector for the 
last six years, his residence being at 63 Seaton Street. In 1855 l1e married 
l\1iss Rebecca, daughter of Robert Stanley, an early settler in Toronto. 
They have a family of seven children, four sons and three daughters, all of 
whom are still living. 


JOSIAH BROWN KING, Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Ontario Inde- 
pendent Order of Oddfellows, was born in Hamilton, Ont., July 4th, 1836, 
his father being Eleazar King, and his mother Adeline Corrinne Brown. 
His father's people were Lower Canadian French. The early life of our 
subject was spent in Niagara, where he learned the trade of carpenter with 
his father. He afterwards worked at his trade in Brantford and Toronto, 
and subsequently engaged in the hat, cap and fur business in Brantford, 
Ont., which he carried on until his removal to Toronto in 1879, the Order 
requiring his whole time and attention. He was elected to his present 
position in August, 1876. He is a Reformer and a member of Bond Street 
Congregational Church. His wife was Miss Brockington, of Plymouth, 
England. 


DR. JOHN S. KING, Toronto, was born at Georgetown, County of Halton, 
Ontario, on April 26th, 1843' His father was Stephen King, who was born 
in Doontown, \Viltshire, England, in 1813, being the second son in a family 
of six sons and two daughters born to James and Alice (Taylor) King. 
Stephen King came to Canada in 1833, visited Toronto and was joined, in 



9 0 


Biograplzical Notices. 


1835, by his father and his family, who located in the Township of Bayham, 
County of Elgin. Subsequent to the Canadian Rebellion he located in 
Toronto, and was one of the few who formed the first class at the Congre- 
gational College, which was then located on Y onge Street. The building 
(a frame one) stood, until last summer, where Edward's lumber yard now is. 
In 1839 Stephen King went to Hamilton, and in 1842 married Margaret 
Hess, of German extraction. Her father, Samuel Hess, came from Penn- 
sylvania, during the \Var of 1812, and settled in the Township of Barton, 
County of Wentworth. Stephen King and wife are both still living with 
their son, the Doctor, in Toronto. Dr. John S. King became a school- 
teacher when nineteen years of age, and rapidly rose, soon becoming 
Principal of the \Vaterloo Central School; during the first two years of its 
existence, he was President of the Waterloo County Teachers' Association. 
Meanwhile he had become a valuable and paid contributor to various news- 
papers"and periodicals. He gave up teaching in 1869, and in 1872 became 
a member of the Globe editorial staff, on which he continued for three years; 
he was also for three years Canadian correspondent of the Chicago Tribune, 
as well as a writer for several other papers. \Vhile writing for the press he 
began the. study of medicine, and abandoned the press to enter that profes- 
sion. In 1876 he became a member of the Ontario College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. He subsequently received the degree of M.D. from the 
University of Victoria College. In 1881, he was appointed medical officer 
of the Mercer Reformatory. In addition to this he has a large and lucrative 
practice in Toronto. In 1874 he became a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, in which society he rapidly rose. In 1876 he entered the Grand 
Lodge, and at the same session was elected Grand Chancellor of the Order 
of Ontario; at the three following annual sessions he was re-elected to the 
office. In 1877 he was elected a member of the Supreme Grand Lodge, 
and is at this writing the Supreme Prelate, or third highest officer in that 
society, numbering one hundred and sixty thousand members. He has 
likewise held at various times official positions in the following societies, 
viz., Freemasons, Oddfellows, A. O. U. W., Select Knights, Sons of Eng- 
land and Royal Arcanum. He is now one of the Vice-presidents of St. 
George's Society. 


SAMUEL LEE, a deceased York Pioneer, was the second son of \Villiam 
Lee, of Blakefield, Ennescarthy, Wexford County, Ireland. He was born 
on the 25th December, 1795, and received his education in Dublin. He 
afterwards entered the artillery service of the Honourable East India Com- 
pany, and, in the companionship of his brother, sailed for Madras in the 



City of Toronto. 


9 1 


year 1814. His battery (No.3) was in active service continuously for six 
years, and during that period Samuel Lee visited the greater portion of the 
vast Indian peninsula. \i\Thile stationed at Dum Dum, he occupied the "Vor- 
sbipful Master's chair in lodge "Courage with Humanity," A. F. and A. 1\1., 
and was also a Companion of the Honourable and Ancient Order of Red 
Cross Knights. He returned to England in 1827, and thence to his home 
in Ireland, from which he had been absent thirteen years. After a stay 
there of six years, he set sail for Canada, bringing with him his two sisters, 
arriving in New York July, 1833' Two years after his advent he married 
Jane Taylor, by whom they had six children, of whom are still living : P. 
T. Lee, Newmarket; Joseph R. Lee, Toronto; and Mrs. E. C. Pomeroy, 
Le Clare, Iowa. For thirty years Samuel Lee was manager and financier 
for John Richey, Esq., builder, and under his management many of the 
older churches of the city were erected; as also the Provincial Lunatic 
Asylum, Trinity College, Corn Exchang
, Holy Trinity Church, St. 
George's Church, Court House, New Fort buildings, the \Vidmer Hospital, 
the original Upper Canada College, and Professor's dwelling the British 
Coffee House and other public and private buildings. He was secretary 
and treasurer of the Leader up to the time of its demise. At the time of 
the troubles of 1837, he was the first to answer Colonel McLean's call for 
volunteers to defend Toronto against \Villiam Lyon Mackenzie's irregulars. 
Mr. Lee died at his residence, Vanauley Street, on January 18th, 1882, after 
a short illness, in the eighty-seventh year of his age. .. 


THOMAS H. LEE, importer of watches and jewellery, is the fourth son of 
a family of nine sons and eight daughters, born to Joseph Lee by his two 
wives, Mary Clark and ]\tlaria Shanks. Joseph Lee was born in London, 
England, in 1794, and was a ship architect. In 1832 he came to Canada 
and settled in Little York, where, after having held several offices, including 
that of Alderman, he died August 20th, 1861 ; his second wife, who was born 
in London, England, in 1810, is still living. Joseph Lee's father was James 
Lee; he was an officer in the BritIsh army, and served in the Battle of 
Waterloo. The subject of this sketch was born in Montreal in i832, and 
was educated at Toronto. In 1856 he began business in the jewellery line 
with J. G. Joseph, in the Victoria Block, on King Street. Be is a Con- 
servative in politics, and for twenty-seven years has been connected with 
the Freemasons. He married a daughter of Thomas Bell. 


JOHN LEYS, barrister, etc., was born January 27th, 1834, at Pickering, 
Ont., and is a son of the late Francis Leys, of Aberdeenshire, Scotland. 



9 2 


Biograpltical No#ces. 


He studied law with the late Angus Morrison, and in 1855 was admitted to 
the bar. He was one of the 'projectors of the Narrow Gauge Railway, and 
has always taken an active interest in railway matters. In politics he is a 
Reformer. 'He twice contested the seat for East Toronto in the Local 
Legislature, but was defeated, his opponent on each occasion being the 
Hon. Alex. Morris. In 1865 Mr. Leys was married to Helen, only 
daughter of the late William Arthurs. 
WILLIAM LUMBERS, sen'r, was born at Peterborough, County of North- 
ampton, England, in 1816, being the only son of James Lumbers. His 
mother's maiden name was Maddison. Mr. Lumbers came to Quebec in 
1837, then travelled through Ontario with a Cornish regiment, in which he 
had enlisted for a life term, but he only remained in it about four years and 
eight months. He returned to England, with the regiment, in 1841, and pur- 
chased his discharge. During the winter of 1837 the regiment was on duty in 
Lower Canada, after which it came to Ontario on foot, one thousand strong, 
commanded by Colonel Maitland, who later died at London (Ont.). Mr. 
Lumbers participated in the Battle of Point DePlay, when ninety-three men 
of his regiment defeated five hundred rebels, killing eighty of the enemy. 
After he had procured his discharge he came to Toronto in June, 1842, and 
engaged in different occupations, prominent among which was an immense 
dairy, consisting of over four hundred cows, from which he supplied almost 
the entire city with milk for a period of ten 
 years. During nearly forty 
years of his life he made the herbs and roots of the fields and forest almost 
his constant study, until he acquired considerable knowledge of their use 
and medicinal virtues. He prepared from these simples invaluable com- 
pounds, which he gave gratuitously to the poor, and all who applied for 
them, for years. The demand becoming so great, he decided to bestow 
on all his fellow-men the benefit of his years of study and experience. 
Consequently, in 1881, taking to assist him his youngest son, Henry, he 
embarked in the proprietary medicines business, which enables him to 
place within the reach of all those invaluable preparations which cost him 
years of labour and study to discover. His family consists of seven sons 
(all of whom are engaged in different trades in Toronto, with the exception 
of one who resides in Manitoba), and two daughters. 
PATARICK 1\fcBRINE was born in Ireland in 1820, and in r838 emigrated 
to Canada and settled in Toronto. He joined the first incorporated 
Dragoons, then stationed in this city and commanded by Captain Magrath. 
They were shortly afterwards ordered to Kingston, which was at that time 
the seat of Government, and while there Mr. McBrine was appointed 



CÜy of Toronto. 


93 


mounted orderly to his Excellency the Governor-General, Lord Sydenham. 
The troop was discharged at Kingston, from further service, in 1842, and 
Mr. McBrine returned to Toronto, settling on Maitland Street, at that time 
enjoying the suggestive title of \Vood's bush. Church Street was then 
a deep ravine, difficult to cross from one bank to the other. 11r. McBrine 
was employed in the Bank of Montreal for nearly thirty years, and now 
receives a pension from that institution, having lived retired since '1878. 
In 1865 he married Miss Catharine Guthrie, of Toronto, by whom he had 
three sons and two daughters. 
TIMOTHY MCCARTHY, 194 Sherbourne Street, was born near Killarney, 
County Kerry, Ireland, in 1818, arrived in Quebec in May, 1841. After 
reaching Kingston he went to Rochester, and returned to Toronto in May. 
1842. He was teacher of the Separate School, Richmond Street East, about 
three years, and afterwards kept a grocery store on King Street East. In 
1851,on a strong letter of recommendation from the Hon. Robert Baldwin, he 
was appointed by the Hon. Francis Hincks manifest clerk in the long room, 
about loth April, the duties of which he performed about six weeks. He was 
then transferred to one of the wharves and appointed landing waiter, receiv- 
ing his commission from Lord Elgin. On his first entrance into the Custom 
House there was only Collector, Mundell. He was transferred to the port 
of Belleville in 1857. Surveyor Scott and Chief Clerk Cameron, and two 
landing waiters then comprised his staff. He is at present officiating under 
his fourth collector, the Hon. James Patton, and will have been thirty-four 
years in that department on loth April next, and the oldest Custom House 
official in the port. 


ALEXANDER MCCLELLAND, retired, is a native of Ireland, having been 
born in County Tyrone in 1819. He came to Canada in 1844 and landed 
in Toronto, where he first engaged in school teaching, following that occu- 
pation for twenty-two years; after which he held the office of receiver for 
the Street Railway Company, for:several years. He next kept a grocery, 
flour and feed store, etc., at 253 King Street East, from which he retired in 
1873. He held the office of city assessor for three y
ars. In 1844 he 
married Miss E. McClelland, by whom he has a family of two sons and two 
daughters. The Rev. Thomas J. l\IcClelland is pastor of the First Reformed 
Presbyterian Church at Brooklyn, N.Y.; the Rev. Alexander McClelland 
is located at Duncanville, Onto 


ANDREW TAYLOR MCCORD, jun'r, was born in Toronto on the 14th April, 
1848. His father, Andrew Taylor lVlcCord, was born in Cookstown, in the 



94 


Biographical Notices. 


North of Ireland, on the 12th July, 1808. He emigrated to Canada with 
his father, Andrew McCord, who died in Toronto in the year 1851. Three 
of Mr. McCord's sisters are still alive, viz.: Mrs. Peter Freeland, Miss 
l'vlcCord and Mrs. John Rains. He held the office of city treasurer for 
forty-five years, having been appointed in 1834. He was four years Presi- 
dent of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society, which society chiefly owes 
its existence to Mr. McCord, who was one of the originators. He was for 
thirty years one of the Vice-Presidents of the Tract and Bible Society, and 
also acted as its Secretary for many years. He was also connected with the 
Home for Incurables, House of Industry, Newsboys' Home, as a director 
or otherwise. l\Ir. McCord organized the first Baptist church here; it was 
situated on March Street, now Lombard Street. He was a Justice of the 
Peace, appointed to that position by the Mowat administration; in politics 
he was a Reformer. For nearly thirty years he lived at the north-east corner 
of Church and Gloucester Streets, when he died September sth, 1881, 
leaving a wife, six daughters and one son. Mrs. McCord, the wife of our 
subject, is the daughter of the late Andrew Taylor, of Dublin, Ireland, a 
large ship-owner. He ran the first line of steamers between Dublin and 
Glasgow. She was born on the 17th of March, 1814, and resides with her 
son, IVIr. A. T. McCord, jun'r, at the old family residence on the corner of 
Gloucester and Church Streets. 
S. EDWARD MCCULLY, M.D., Ontario Pulmonary Institute. The pro- 
prietor of this institute was born in the County of Kent, Province of Ontario, 
in the year 18tp. Dr. McCully received his education in Toronto, and his 
degree of M.D. from the University of Victoria College in the year 1862. 
His grandfather went to Nova Scotia from Scotland in the year 1776, and 
was a Baptist minister well-known from one end of that Province to the 
other, being one of the founders of the now large Baptist body there. He 
raised a large family, some of whom became fårmers, some lawyers and one 
a Li v
rpool lumber merchant. Among the more notable of the family was 
the Honourable Jonathan l'vlcCully, who for a quarter of a century served 
his country in the positions, at various times, of Attorney-General of Nova 
Scotia and Solicitor-General;* also as one of the Confederation Delegates 
from that Province to Quebec, and lastly to London, England. When 
Confederation became a fait accomPli, he was called to the Senate of Canada, 
and lastly, was appointed Judge of the Supreme Court of his Province, 
holding that position till his death. He was taken ill while sitting on the 


* He was appointed Puisne Judge before Confederation, but at the call of his party 
resigaed his seat and again entered active political life. 



City of Toronto. 


95 


Bench, and died shortly afterwards in harness. Dr. McCully's mother was 
born in Halifax, and had the honour, with her father, to be the first to 
board the Shannon as she swung up to the dock at Halifax with the Chesa
 
þeake in tow, and the old lady can yet give a vivid account of the scene of 
blood and carnage that met her eye on that memorable occasion. In the 
year 1834, the doctor's father and mother started from Cumberland, N .S., 
for Canada, and after an eventful voyage, first to Boston and then to 
Buffalo, they arrived in the County of Kent, where they hewed out a home 
from the then almost upbroken forest, and where the old gentleman died, a 
few years ago, at the ripe age of seventy-two. Many were the vicissitudes 
through which they passed during the earlier stages of their pioneer life; 
among others an attack by Indians set on by the U. E. Loyalists, when the 
mother of the subject of this review upset a beehive just in front of the house, 
cqusing the dusky warriors, amid howls of pain and terror, to beat a hasty 
retreat before the foe. Dr. McCully is now practising as a specialist, and is 
treating chronic, skin, blood and nervous diseases and deformities, as well as 
throat and lung. He has a large and comfortable place on the corner of Jarvis 
and Gerrard Streets, in this city, and is using electricity in all its forms 
known to the medical profession. He takes his patients into the house, now 
known all over Canada as the Ontario Pulmonary and Electric Institute, 
and his is the only sanatorium of the kind in Canada. He is of the advanced 
school of thought, using inhalations in lung diseases and removing cancers, 
not only by the knife but also by the plaster and solution QY electricity. 
He has also discovered recently an absolute cure for rupture without using 
knife or truss. 


JOHN MCGANN, hotel-keeper, Toronto, was born in Little York in 182 9. 
His father, Patrick McGann, was born in Sligo, Ireland, in 1782, and in 
1816 came to Canada and located at Kingston, where he married Betsy 
W air, by whom he had the following children: Charles, dead; Thomas, 
dead; Edward, a farmer in the Township of Scarboro'; and one daughter 
who died in infancy. These children were all born in Little York, whither 
the parents removed from Kingston in 1820. Patrick McGann engaged in 
business on King Street, near Sherbourne, until 1832, when both he and his 
wife died of cholera. After his father's death John l'vlcGann was kept 
at school by his aunt and uncle. In 1849 he commenced sailing on the 
lakes between Kingston and Chicago, and continued at that until 186 9 
when he engaged in business as ship-broker. He afterwards opened an 
hotel and still carries on that bu'siness. In politics Mr. McGann is a strong 
Conservative. 



9 6 


Biographical Notices. 


THOMAS MCGAW (of McGaw & Winnett), proprietors of the Queen's 
Hotel, was born in the Township of Whitby, County of Ontario, in 18 33. 
His father, Thomas McGaw, was born in Cairn Regan, Wigtonshire, Scot- 
land, in 1792, and came to Canada in 1832; he settled in the Township 
of \Vhitby where he resided until his death in 1878; his wife is living in 
Toronto, and is ninety years of age. He was a Baldwin Reformer; during 
the Rebellion he was arrested but afterwards released. The subject of this 
sketch lived on his father's farm until the year 1850, when he went into a 
country store, subsequently in 1859 to the United States, where he remained 
until the Trent affair, when he returned to Toronto and joined the Victoria 
Rifles. In 1862 he came to Toronto and engaged in business at the 
Queen's Hotel with the late Captain Dick, owner of the building. It was 
at first intended for four private residences; it afterwards became Knox 
College, then Sword's Hotel, and lastly the Queen's. Mr. McGaw 
married a daughter of Captain William Gordon, who ran the old lake 
steamer Admiral, and who died of cholera in 1847. 


JOHN McINTOSH, lumber merchant, was born January 30th, 1826, in 
Little York. His father was John, son of John McIntosh, who was born 
in Scotland in 1754, and came to Canada in 1801 with his wife, whose 
maiden name was Ann Ferguson, and his children, Nancy, John, Jane, 
Robert and Jean, all of whom are now dead. His grandfather remained 
at Quebec for two years, and in 1803 located at Little York, where, on the 
corner of Duke and Princess Streets, he worked at his trade, that of a 
blacksmith. He purchased from the Hon. John McGill a lot on the corner 
of Y onge and Queen Streets, containing one and a-half acres, for which he 
paid $400; on this he built a house, After coming to Canada there were 
born to him six children, viz.: Isabel, Eliza, William, Charles, Jean and 
David; of these the only living ones are Isabel, now Mrs. Elliott, living at 
Highland Creek; and David, living in Fulton, Calvin County, Missouri. 
He died January 29 th , 18 3 0 ; his wife died in 1814. John McIntosh, the 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Scotland in 1796. After 
coming to Toronto with his parents he went to school to the late Bishop 
Strachan. He and his brothers married and sailed the lakes for many 
years. A short time after the war of 1812, he and his brother James owned 
a vessel called the Brothers.. Robert and William sailed with them until 
they got a vessel of their own. In the fall of 1833, Charles built the steamer 
Cobourg, which he ran between Toronto and Montreal; he died of 
cholera in 1834, and was followed by his brother James one week later. 
John served in the war of 1812, and was present at the capitulation of 



City of Toronto. 


97 


Detroit. He was also in the militia at the time York was taken by the 
Americans. He was a Baldwin RefÒrmer, and was chairman of the 
Reform Committee at the time when \Villiam Lyon Mackenzie went to 
England to lay the grievances of the people before the British Government. 
For eight years he represented the North Riding of York in the Parlia- 

ent of Upper Canada. He was twice married. In 1823 he was married 
to Cathaìine, daughter of Rev. Alexander Stewart, the first Baptist 
minister in Little York; she was born in Scotland, and came to Canada in 
1813 with her father; she died February loth, 1832. By her Mr. McIntosh 
had five children, viz.: Catharine, John, Ann Jane, James, and another, 
who died in infancy. In the year 1833 he married a widow, named Ellen 
Ferguson, by whom he had seven children: Isabel, Robert, Ellen, Eliza, 
J ames, Charles and Margaret. In religion 
ir. McIntosh was a Protestant. 
His first wife was a Baptist. He died in Toronto on July 3 rd , 1853. 
John McIntosh, whose father and grandfather bore th
 same name, was 
born in Little York, January 30th, 1826. He was educated at the primary 
schools and at Upper Canada College. In 1847 he began a three years 
apprenticeship with Ísaac \Vhite as builder. In 1849 he entered mercan- 
tile life by opening an agricultural implement and hardware store on Y onge 
Street, in partnership with Samuel \Valton. He continued this for five 
years, when he entered Patterson's hardware store. In 1869 he engaged 
in the lumber business, and has been at that ever since. On August 18th, 
1853, he married Isabella \Valton, youngest daughter of :Matthew \Valton, 
by whom he has five children living, viz.: Anna, Isabella, Adele, Alice 
and Lillian; he lost six children by death. In religion IVlr. McIntosh is 
a Baptist, and in politics a Reformer. 


ARCHIBALD McKINLAY, 94 Gloucester Street, was born in the State of 
South Carolina, in 1817, and is the son of John and Esther (Jackson) 
:l\IcKinlay. In early life he had the advantage of a good education and was 
the youngest son in a family of five children, none of whom except himself 
càme to Canada. He arrived here in 1856 and joined Mr. O. T. Bevan in 
a general manufacturing business for four years, subsequently entering 
largely into the lumber trade. In Ú
78 1\1r. McKinlay purchased a farm in 
the Township of \Vest York, part of lot 27, concession 2, and is at present 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1857 he bought the property where he 
resides, his residence having been erected by Lavens Newsome. He is a 
member of the English Church, and was for many years treasurer of the 
Temperance Society of Yorkville. In politics he is a Reformer. Mr. 
l\IcKinlay is the only surviving member of his father's family. He married 

 



9 8 


Bz"ograplu'cal Notices. 


before he came to Canada, and has only one son; he is engaged in the 
window shade manufacturing. 


WILLIAM McLAREN, D.D., Professor of Systematic Theology, Knox 
College; residence, 73 St. George Street. Dr. McLaren is a native of 
Canada. He was born in the Township of Torbolton, in the County 01 
Carleton, and is the fifth son of David McLaren, who was born 
t Drum- 
lochey, Perthshire, Scotland, in 1789. His mother, Elizabeth Barnet, was 
born at Auchterarder, Perthshire, in 1788. His parents were married on 
6th January, 1817, and after residing some years in Glasgow, came to 
Canada in 1822; and settled for a short time at Richmond,Ont. They then 
removed w Torbolton, on the banks of the Ottawa, where \Villiam was 
born. Subsequently Mr. David McLaren removed to \Vakefield, Quebec, 
where he died in 1869; his wife following him six years later. He was by 
occupation a farmer, mill-owner and merchant, having been for a number 
of years associated with two [of his sons in the well-known lum bering firm 
of James McLaren & Co., Wakefield and Ottawa. William McLaren 
received his preliminary education in the Grammar School, Ottawa, and in 
the Toronto Academy, an institution which, owing to changes in the 
educational system of the Province, was subsequently closed. I-lis college 
training was secured. in Knox College, which at that time gave both a 
Theological and an Arts course. He also attended certain classes in the 
University of Toronto, although it was not then on its present liberal basis. 
,On 1st June, 1853, he was ordained by the Presbytery of London, in con- 
nection with the Presbyterian Church of Canada, and was inducted into the 
charge of the church at Amherstburg, Ont. Here he entered upon his 
responsible duties with zeal and earnestness, and met with an encouraging 
measure of success. In 1857 he moved to Boston, Mass., having received a 
call from Knox Church, Beacon Street, now known as Columbus Avenue 
Presbyterian Church. The congregation was then in connection with the 
Presbytery of Montreal. This connection having been found inconsistent, 
it was, on his advice, dissolved, and the congregation was transferred to the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States, and l\lr. McLaren returned to 
Canada. After receiving various invitations to important spheres of labour, 
Mr. McLaren accepted a call to the John Street Presbyterian Church, 
Belleville, where he laboured with success until 1870, when he was called 
to the pastorate of Knox Church, Ottawa. During his residence in Ottawa 
he held, by appointment of the General Assembly for the Session of 1872, 
the position of Lecturer on Apologetics in the Presbyterian College, Mon- 
treal. In 1873 he was appointed, by the same body, to the chair of System- 



City of Toronto. 


99 


atic Theology in Knox College, and as a professor has achieved success in 
his Alma Mater. In 1883 the University of Queen's College, Kingston, con- 
ferred on Prof. McLaren the degree of Doctor of Divinity. Dr. McLaren 
has always taken an active interest in the missionary operations and iu 
the general work of the Church, and was for sixteen years convener of its 
Foreign Mission Committee. He is at present -Moderator of the General 
Assembly, that body having conferred on him the highest honour in its gift, 
by electing him to that office in June, 1884. In 1854 Dr. McLaren married 
Miss Marjory Laing, third daughter of James R. Laing, of Middrie Park, 
Melbourne, Quebec. He has living one son, David, a Licentiate of the 
Presbyterian Church, and one daughter, Elizabeth Barnet, now Mrs. 
Arthur Mowat. 


COLONEL NEIL McLEAN, late of. St. Andrews, in the County of Stor- 
mont, Upper Canada, was born at Mingary, in the Island of Mull, in the 
year 1759. At an early age he served as ensign and lieutenant in the 
Royal Highland Emigrants, or 84th Regiment. The regiment was disbanded 
after the American Revolution, and Mr. :McLean placed on half-pay 
on the 24th of June, 1784. In 1796 he was made Captain in the .Royal 
Canadian Volunteers and served in Montreal, Quebec and York, until that 
corps was disbanded. He was then appointed Sheriff of the Eastern Dis- 
trict, and in 1812 he was again in active service as Colonel of the Stormont 
Militia and Commandant of the District, taking part in the Battle of 
Chrysler's Farm. After the war he was appointed Legislative Councillor of 
Upper Canada. He married the youngest daughter of John McDonell, of 
Leek, who, with his two brothers, l\IcDonells ofCoulaquhi and Aberholder, 
emigrated from Scotland with a number of their dependents and clansmen 
to the British possessions in America. vVhen the Rebellion broke out the 
brothers remained true to their country, and leaving their property on the 
Mohawk River made their way through the wilderness to Canada. John 
McDonell, of Leek, died in Montreal and was buried under the parish 
church. Colonel McLean had three sons and five daughters, the sons were 
John, Archibald and Alexander. John, the eldest, was at one time Sheriff 
of Frontenac, and subsequently Registrar of the Counties of Glengarry, 
Stormont and Dundas; he served through the \Var of 1812. Alexander, the 
third son, also served through the war, being severely wounded when lead- 
ing the attack at Ogdensburg. He was for some years member for Stor- 
mont and Commandant of the Eastern District; he died at Cornwall in 
1875, aged eighty-two years. Colonel McLean's second son, Archibald, was 
born at St. Andrews, on the 15th of April, 1791, and was educated in Corn- 



100 


Biographical .l\lotz"ces. 


wall at the celebrated Dr. Strachan School. When sixteen years of age he 
went to York and studied law with Mr. Firth, the then Attorney-General. 
In 1812 he got a commission in the 3rd York Militia, and was wounded at 
Queenston Heights while assisting Lieutenant-Colonel McDonell (Aide-de- 
Camp to General Brock), who, when wounded, called to him," Archy, help 
me!" Owing to delay in extracting the ball, Mr. McLean's life was for a time 
despaired of, and for several months he could not return to his duty. Mr. Mc- 
Lean was in York when it was taken by the Americans. He carried the 
colours of the 3rd York Militia to a place of safety, burying them in the woods 
behind Mr. McGill's house, the site where now stands the Metropolitan 
Church; he made good his escape and reported himself at Kingston. After 
this he raised a company for the incorporated military from among the 
Highlanders of Glengarry. He commanded this company at Lundy's Lane, 
where he was taken prisoner, and was detained, part of the time in close 
confinement, until the end of the war. After peace was proclaimed, declin- 
ing a commission offered him in the regular army, he resumed the study of 
the law under Dr. Baldwin, father of the late Ro
. Robert Baldwin, and 
was called to the bar in 1815. He then established himself in Cornwall, 
,,,here he continued to reside until his appointment to the Bench, in 1837. 
He m
rried Miss Joan McPherson, a daughter of John McPherson, Esq., of 
Three Rivers. In 1817 Mr. McLean was retained by the North-West 
Company to take evidence relating to the difficulties between the North- 
\Vest Fur Company and the Hudson's Bay Company, which difficulties had 
led to the killing of Governor Semple and his men. The long journey to 
the Red River had to be made by canoe and the party suffered a good deal 
of hardship, the scarcity of provisions compelling them to live for three 
weeks entirely upon catfish. The object of this journey was, however, 
accomplished. In 1820 he was elected to the Parliament of Upper Canada 
from the County of Stormont, and continued a member of the House until 
18 37, when he was appointed to the Bench, having been twice Speaker of 
the House. In 1825 he went to England to press the claims for pensions of 
those who had served during the \Var of 1812 and succeeded in having these 
claims allowed. On being called to the Bench in 1837 he came with his 
family to Toronto, arriving here about a month before the breaking out of 
the Rebellion. A few days before that event, in conversation with some of 
his brother judges, he expressed his fears that there would be trouble. 
" Oh," said one of them, " McLean, you are afraid." "Yes," he said, "I 
am afraid we will be caught napping," and sure enough there was not a 
soldier in the town when Mackenzie assembled his force at Montgomery's 
Hill. When the bells rang out the alarm, he, with his eldest son, John, took 



City of TOY01ztO. 


101 


his horses, and going to the old fort, they got artillery harness, and, lumber- 
ing up a twelve-pounder, drove to the City Hall, where the loyal people were 
assembling. As they drove up, the word went through the hall: "Here 
come the rebels," and a hundred guns were levelled, when fortunately 
they were recognized by Chief Justice Robinson, who told the men who 
they were. In the attack on Montgomery's Hill, Judge (Colonel) McLean 
commanded the left wing. He was afterwards sent to Washington with 
despatches to the British Minister, and when en route would have been taken 
as a hostage by the sympathizers (Mackenzie being then on Navy Island), 
had it not been for: the care of his warm personal friend, though political 
adversary, -Marshall S. 'Bidwell, who, with some of the leading people of 
Rochester, kept watch to prevent any attempt to seize him. His career on 
the Bench is one of the traditions of the Law Society. His judgment in 
the celebrated Anderson case having excited more popular feeling and 
gratitude than any judgment ever delivered in Canada. On the retirement 
of Sir John Robinson, Judge McLean was appointed Chief Justice of Upper 
Canada, and in 1863 he was made President of the Court of Appeal. He 
died on the twenty-fourth day of October, 1865, in his seventy-fifth year. 
At the request of the Law Society, and the profession generally, his funeral 
was a public one. In commenting on his death, the Upper Canada Law 
Journal wrote as follows: " The manner of the late President of the Court 
of Appeal upon the Bench was dignified and courteous. Unsuspicious, and 
utterly devoid of anything mean or petty in his own character, his conduct 
to others was always what he expected from them. The profession gener- 
ally, the young student as well as the old practitioner, will long remember 
with affection his courtesy and forbearance in Chambers and on the Bench; 
others will think of him as an entertaining and agreeable companion and a 
true friend; while others willi call to mind the stately form of th; old Judge 
as he approached and entered St. Andrew's Church, where he was a con- 
stant and devout attendant, rain or sunshine, until his last illness which 
terminated in death. Archibald McLean was a man of remarkable and 
commanding presence; tall, straight and well-formed in person, with a 
pleasant, handsome face, and a kind and courteous manner, he looked and 
was every inch a man and a gentleman. He belonged to a race, most of 
whom have now passed away, the giants of Canada's early history. He 
was one of those honest, brave, enduring, steadfast men, sent by Provi- 
dence to lay the foundation of a country's greatness. The funeral cortege 
proceeded to the Necropolis, where amidst the sorrow of all who knew 
him were deposited the mortal remains of the Honourable Archibald 
McLean; the brave soldier; the upright judge; and the Christian gentle- 



102 


Biographical Notices. 


man." Mrs. McLean, who survived him, came of Highland descent, her 
grandfather being the man who accompanied Dr. Cameron (brother of 
Locheil), his first cousin, to Scotland after the forty-five. Dr. Cameron was 
taken and was the last man executed. Her grandfather was pardoned and 
offered a commission, which he declined. He emigrated to Canada and 
assisted in the defence of Quebec, being one of the defenders of the Sault-aux- 
l\Iatelot, when -Montgomery was killed; one of his sons was killed during 
the siege. He was offered payment for his services and for his house
 
which was burned by a shell, but the old Highlander replied, "I take 
nothing from the House of Hanover." Mrs. McLean died in the year 1870, 
leaving seven children surviving her, four sons and thr
e daughters; of the 
sons, John Neil, the eldest, died at Prescott, Ontario, in 1875; Archibald 
George is a barrister III Toronto; Thomas Alexander was an officer in the 
Queen's Own at Ridgeway, and subsequently raised and commanded the 
Toronto Garrison Battery. He is now Registrar of the Calgary District, 
N. W. T., and the youngest, Neil, is manager of the Branch Bank of 
:\Iontreal, in Brockville, Ontario. The family still hold the old homestead 
on Catharine Street, Toronto. 


THE HONOURABLE \VILLIAM McMASTER, who to-day stands in the front 
rank of Toronto's prominent citizens, was born in the County of Tyrone, 
Ireland, on the 24th December, 1811. After receiving a sound education 
at a private school, he bade farewell to home, friends and country and set 
sail from Londonderry in 1833, bound for New York, leaving for Toronto 
in the same year, and entered upon his brilliant business career as a clerk 
in the wholesale and retail house of Robert Cathcart. His business tact 
and great ability were not long in making themselves known to his employer, 
and in 1834 Mi. Cathcart gave him a partnership in the business. This 
continued for ten years, when Mr. McMaster decided to launch out into 
business for himself. He accordingly opened out a wholesale dry goods 
house, and, by his industry, extended his business so thoroughly that there 
were few merchants in Western Ontario who were not his customers. The 
business increasing he found it necessary to move to larger premises, which 
he built adjoining the Bank of Montreal. The style of the firm was now 
William Mcl\laster & Nephews. After a few years it was again found 
necessary to increase their premises. They accordingly erected the large 
and commodious warehouse on Front Street, now occupied by A. R. 
McMaster & Brother, the firm which succeeded the old one on the retire- 
ment of Mr. Mc1Vlaster, who decided to turn his attention to financial affairs' 
Since his retirement from the wholesale dry-goods trade, Mr. McMaster has 



City of Toronto. 


10 3 


found a sphere in which his fine abilities have produced as good fruit as 
they did in commercial life. He was foremost among those who organized 
the Bank of Commerce, and is one of the principal stockholders. On the 
incorporation of the Bank he was elected its first President, and has held 
that position for more than twenty years. He has also held other responsible _ 
positions. Among these are Director of the Bank of Montreal; Director 
of the Ontario Bank; President of the Freehold Loan and Savings Com- 
pany; Vice-president of the Confederation Life Association and Director 
of the Isolated Risk and Farmers' Insurance Company. For several years 
Mr. McMaster was Chairman of the Canadian Board of the Great Western 
Railway, and was the only member retained by the English Board upon the 
Canadian Board being abolished. In politics Mr. McMaster is a Liberal, 
but took no active part until 1862. In that year he was elected to repre- 
sent, in the Legislative Council, the Midland Division, comprising the 
counties of South Simcoe and North York. Up to the year 1856 the I!lem- 
bers of the Legislative Council had received their appointments from the 
Crown, but, by a change made in the Constitution in that year, the elective 
system was introduced, the members to hold office for eight years. Mr. 
McMaster was at first reluctant to contest the seat, but, when pressed by 
his friends, yielded, and going into the contest with his usual vigour and 
energy was returned by a large majority. Before the term for which he 
was elected had elapsed Confederation took place and the Legislative 
Council passed away, to be succeeded by the Senate. By Royal Proclama- 
tion in May, 1867, Mr. McMaster was one of the Senators called to repre- 
sent Ontario. In 1865 he was appointed a member of the Council of 
Public Instruction, and until 1875 he continued to represent, at the Board, 
the Baptist Church, of which he is a prominent member. In 1873 the 
Lieutenant-Governor nominated him a member of the Senate of Toronto 
University. The Canadian Literary and Theological Institute, originally 
at Woodstock, owes its existence to Mr. McMaster. He contributed 
$12,000 to the building fund, and constantly assisted the Institute by 
generous donations. This valuable institution was afterwards removed to 
Toronto, where a magnificent building, known as McMaster Hall, has been 
built, Mr. McMaster contributing $60,000 toward its erection. The Jarvis 
Street Baptist Church is another monument to the- liberality of this great 
friend of education and religion. The joint contribution of Mr. McMaster 
and his wife to the building fund of this costly and handsome structure is 
$60,000. Nor are these donations the extent of his generosity. The Upper 
Canada Bible Society, a non-sectarian institution, of which he is Treasurer, 
and the Superannuated Ministers' Society of the Baptist Church of Ontario, 



10 4 


Biographical Notices. 


enjoy his support, both by donations and personal services. Mr. McMaster 
has been twice married; in 1851 to Mary Henderson, of New York City, 
who died in 1868, and in 1871 to Susan :J\Iolton, widow of the late James 
Fraser, of Newburgh, N.Y. 


ALBERT A. MACDONALD, M.B., 202 Simcoe Street, is the son of the 
late Judge Archibald Macdonald, of Guelph, and grandson of the late Cap- 
tain Macdonald of the 25th Regiment. He was born at Cobourg in 18 5 1 , 
and was educated at Guelph and at Toronto University, where he 
graduated in 1872. He then visited the medical schools of Great Britain, 
chiefly those in London and Edinburgh. He was afterwards elected a 
Fellow of the Obstetrical Society of London and became a Licentiate of the 
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Edinburgh. In 1873 he com- 
menced active practice in Guelph, continuing until 1878 when he removed 
to Toronto where he has had extensive surgical experience. He is Surgeon 
to the Orphans' Home, Surgeon on the active staff of the General Hospital 
and Consulting Surgeon to the. Infants' Home. He is also examiner for a 
number of insurance companies and is Medical Referee for Ontario for the 
Equitable Life Insurance Company of New York. Dr. Macdonald received a 
military training under the 29th and 60th Regiments, and took first class 
certificates at both the infantry q.nd artillery schools, under .Lieutenant- 
Colonel Williams, R.A. In 1872 he was appointed Surgeon to the 
\Vellington Field Battery, and was afterwards transferred to a similar 
position in the Toronto Field Battery which he now holds. 
W. H. l'.IAC
ONALD, M.D., l'.I.R.C.S., England; L.R.C.P. & S
, Edin- 
burgh, 422 Church Street, is a native of Inverness, Scotland. His father, 
Graham Macdonald, was a farmer in that country, came to Canada in 
18 5 6 , and took up land in the County of Halton, where he now resides. 
Dr. Macdonald was educated at Trinity College, Toronto, and in 1883 
graduated at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Edinburgh, 
and the same year in the Royal College of Surgeons, England. In 1883 he 
commenced practice in Toronto. He was one of the resident staff, Toronto 
General Hospital, in 1881-2, and Gold Medallist, Trinity Medical College, 
1882. 


H. T. MACH ELL, l'.1.D., was born in Aurora, Ontario, 1850. He 
was eduçated at Markham Grammar School. In 1873 he took his M.D. 
degree at Toronto University, and afterwards attended the Bellevue 
Hospital, New York, for some time. The years 1874-5 he spent in Great 
Britain, attending the colleges and hospitals in England and Scotland. 



City of Toronto. 


10 5 


Returning to Canada he settled down at his present address, No. 320 
Spadina Avenue, where he has built up a very good practice. Dr. Machell 
married Miss Emily Broughall, daughter of the Rev. A. J. Broughall, 
Rector of St. Stephen's Church, Toronto. 


JAMES G. MALCOLM was born in the Township of Scarboro', April 26th, 
1840. His parents, Archibald and Elizabeth (vVaddell) Malcolm, came to 
Canada from Scotland with seven children in 1834; his father had been 
three times married in Scotland. The family settled in the Township of 
Scarboro', where the father bought two hundred acres of land in the 6th 
concession, where he died in 1866. The subject of this sketch left home in 
186 5, after having learned the trade of a carpenter, and went to Sharon, Pa., 
where he vworked at his trade and where, in 1868, he was married to Laura 
A. Reeves, by whom he has two sons and one daughter. He was also 
living in Chicago at the time of the great fire. In 1874 he returned to 
Canada and settled at Toronto, where he shortly afterwards patented the 
Climax refrigerator; he sold the patent to Brice Bros., who are now 
making a large amount of money' out of it. l\1r. Malcolm built three large 
refrigerators for the new Canada Pacific Railway steamers, the Algo11la, 
the Alberta and the Athabaska. Mr. Malcolm is a member of the A.F. and 
A.M. He has in his possession a very old :l\1asonic emblem. It is a clasp 
which belonged to Malcolm, third King of Scotland, 1057. Mr. Malcolm is 
a great curler and belongs to the Toronto Curling Club. 


ROBERT MALCOLM, saddle and harness-maker, was born in Glasgow, 
Scotland, in 1832, being the seventh in a family of ten sons and five 
daughters. He came to Canada with his parents in 1834. His father, 
Archibald Malcolm, had been a farmer in Lanarkshire until he was twenty- 
fiv.,e; he then"spent his next twenty-five years in Harvey & Coo's wholesale 
silk warehouse, Glasgow. After coming to Canada he engaged in farming 
in the Township of Scarboro' where he resided until the time of his death, 
in 1861, in his seventy-seventh year. His wife was a daughter of the late 
William \Vaddel, of Boness, Scotland; she died in 1884 in her eighty- 
seventh year. Robert Malcolm remained on his father's farm until 1848, 
when he came to Toronto and learned his trade with the late William 
Gibson in East Market Square. He then carried on business in Scarboro' 
for a short time, removing to Toronto in 1853, where he has continued in 
business ever since. J\Ir. Malcolm is a Presbyterian, and a Liberal in 
politics. In 1854 he married Ann, eldest daughter of the late George 
Cummings. Mrs. Malcolm's mother is still hale and hearty at eighty-six, and 



106 


Biographical NO/lees. 


can read the smallest print without glasses. Robert Malcolm is an 
enthusiastic curler, and is connected with the Grand National Curling Club of 
America, and also with the Ontario branch of the Caledonian Curling 
Club of Scotland. 


THOMAS MARA, retired, was born in the town of Carrick-on-Shannon, 
Leitrim, Ireland, in 1808, and is the third in a family of four sons and two 
daughters. His parents were Andrew and Mary (McMann) Mara; they 
died in Ireland; his father was a farrier. In 1832 Thomas Mara came 
to Canada, and having learned shoemaking in Ireland worked at that trade 
in Toronto, with Thomas Griffiths, for two or three years. He then opened 
a shop for himself at 244 King Street West, which he continued for about 
ten years. Then for thirty-five years he was engaged in buying real estate, 
he has now retired from business. Two of his brothers, John aJd Andrew, 
came out in 1842; both are now dead. John's family is living on Grange 
Avenue. In 1835 Mr. Mara married the eldest daughter of Robert Stephens, 
of the Township of Nelson, by whom he has the following children, viz. : 
Susan, married J. Hollinrake, of lVIilton; \Villiam, lives In St. Louis, Mo.; 
Thomas, lives in Milton; Margaret, widow of J. Hickman, lives in Toronto; 
Henry S., is a real estate broker on Toronto Street; Sarah, married 
Alderman J. Brandon, Toronto; Mary Jane lives at home. Mr. Mara 
served under Captain Ross in the Rebellion, and was a member of the old 
fire brígade for fifteen years, and captain for seven years. He was a mem- 
ber of the City Council in 1845-6. In religion he is a Methodist, and in 
politics a Conservative; he is a member of the Irish Protestant Benevolent 
Association. 


WILLIA
f P. MARSTON was born in the County of Kent, England, in 
1820, and came to America in 1832. He remained in the States until 1851, 
after which he removed to Toronto and located on Y onge Street, where he 
conducted a gun business for twenty-eight years. He was the first in this 
line of trade who carried on this business successfully for so long a period, 
and was the only one who manufactured guns in Canada. He retired from 
business in 1879, and has 
ince resided at 99 Alexander Street. 


THEODORE HENRY AUGUSTUS MARTENS, professor of music,37 Charles 
Street, was born in Hamburg, Germany, where he received his first musical 
education under Charles Kolling, and in 1864 went to the Royal Conserva- 
toire of Music in Leipsic to continue his studies under Moscheles, Car 
Reinecke, Plaidy, etc., and the great canonicus, Dr. Hauptman. Here he 
pursued his studies with such earnestness and diligence that he was 



City of Toronto. 


107 


awarded the Mendelssohn Prize which he carried off out of one hundred 
and fifty contestants, and graduated with honour and full diploma in 
1867. At the end of 1868 he came to New York where he made his first 
appearance in Steinway Hall, in one of Theodore Thomas' symphony con- 
certs. Shortly afterwards he was engaged as Pianist by the great Violinist, 
Ole Bull, to travel with him through the United States, and in 1869 came 
to Canada. While in Halifax he had the honour ol performing before His 
Royal Highness Prince Arthur of England. He held the Professorship of 
the Sackville Academy for three years, after which he was three years 
organist of Holy Trinity at St. John, N. B. Returning to Germany for a 
few months he came back to Canada and settled in Toronto, and has since 
been a resident. 


JOHN MARTIN was born in Simcoe County, Ontario, November 8th, 
1840, and settled in Toronto in 1856, when he became a messenger boy for 
the Exchange Bank, remaining there until its failure. He attended the 
Military School where he received a first grade certificate in 1866. For 
several years he was book-keeper for the late Robert Wilkes. In 1872 he 
was admitted to the bar as an attorney and barrister and now practises his 
profession at 46 Church Street. 


JOHN M. MARTIN, machinist, Parkdale, was born in Toronto in 1849. 
His parents, James and Mary (Moodie) Martin, were both born in Dundee 
Scotland, and came to Canada in 1848, when he settled in Toronto. His 
father became foreman in the mechanical shop of the Grand Trunk Rail- 
way and superintended the construction of the first engine run on that 
road. John M. Martin was educated in the public schools. \Vhen he was 
twelve years of age he began to learn his trade, at which he has ever since 
worked. In 1871 he married Harriet Bright, who was born in Toronto, 
April 22nd, 1853. 


JAMES MATHEWS, proprietor of the Robinson House, and ship-owner, 
was born in the Township of Pickering in 1823, being the second SOD in a 
family of seven children. His parents, John and Hannah (Peak) Mathews, 
came from St. John, N.B., and landed at Ashbridge's Bay, there being 
only three small houses in Yprk then. They settled on two hundred acres 
of land in Pickering, being lot 12 in the 2nd concession. He worked on 
the farm until his death in 1878, aged eighty-five years. During the War 
of 1812 he fought at Lundy's Lane, Queenston Heights, Detroit and Sand- 
wich, for which he received four medals; he stood within six feet of 
General Brock when he fell and assisted in carrying him off the field. At 



108 


Biographical Notices. 


his death he left four children: \Vil!iam, Elizabeth, James and John. 
James 1\1athews resided on his father's farm until 1847. He came to 
Toronto in 1854, and opened the International Hotel. He spent a year in 
Oil Springs, and returning to Toronto in 1861 engaged in his present 
business. He is a Reformer and a Methodist, and takes an active part in 
temperance work, being Vice-President of the Temperance Reformation 
_ Society. In 1849 he married Charlotte C., eldest daughter of Samuel 
Thorold, of Niagara, Ontario. 


N. MAUGHAN, Assessment Commissioner for this city, is a native of 
Northumberland, England, and came to Canada in 1832, with his people, at 
the age of ten years. His parents died the year of their arrival here; his 
father on the journey at Lockport, New York. Our subject in his youth 
learned the trade of carpenter, and resided at the surburban Village of 
Eglinton. He followed building and contracting for many years in and 
about Toronto, up to 1869, when he moved into the city, and in 1872 he 
became identified with the Assessment Department. In 1877 he was 
appointed Assessment Commissioner, which he has since retained. In 1843 
he married Sophia Riley, a native of Prescott, Ontario, whose father was 
formerly from the County of Cavan, Ireland, her mother being the daughter 
of Colonel Drummond, an officer in the regular army, who was instrumental 
in settling the Scotch Pioneers in that region. His family consists of three 
sons and two daughters. 


FRANCIS H. MEDCALF, deceased, son of William Medcalf, was born in 
the County of \Vicklow, Ireland, in 1803, being the eldest in a family of ten 
children. In 1819 he came to Canada with his parents, who located on a 
farm in the Bayham District, County of Elgin, where he resided for four 
years. He then went to Philadelphia, Pa., where he learned the trade of a 
millwright and worked for several years. He subsequently married Mary, 
daughter of John Harrison. In 1839 he came to Toronto and located on 
Richmond Street, east of Church Street; four years later he removed to 
Queen Street, upon the present site of Good's foundry, opposite to which he 
conducted business for several years as a manufacturer of agricultural imple- 
ments. In 1850, in order to afford better accommodation for his increasing 
business, he removed to King Street East, near the Don, where he carried 
on business as builder of stearn engines, saw and grist mill machinery, and 
threshing machines, until 1875, when he retired from business and rented his 
place to Mr. Charles Livey, which was destroyed by fire in 1877. In 1879 he 
purchased the foundry at 503 King Street East, then owned by the late 



City of T orolzto. 


109 


William Hamilton; He conducted that until his death In 1880. Besides 
attending to his large manufacturing interests, Mr. Medcalf sat in the City 
Council for six years, representing St. Lawrence, St. John's and St. David's 
Wards. For five years he was Mayor of the city, during which time he visited 
London, England, and Ireland, at his own expense, at the invitation of the 
Lord Mayor, to attentl the grand banquet at the Guildhall, given in honour of 
the mayors of the cities and towns throughout the 
olonies. He was a 
Magistrate, and was brought out for parliamentary honours in East Toronto, 
but was defeated by the Hon. M. C. Cameron. . He was a prominent 
member of the Orange Body, of which he was Grand Master, and was also 
a member of the A.F. and A.M., and of the Church of England. At his 
death he left six children, of whom Alfred, the third in order of birth, 
succeeded him in business. Mr. F. H. Medcalf built the first threshing 
machine and cleaner (combined) in Canada. He was very unfortunate by 
fire, having had his place of business completely destroyed six times, four 
on Queen Street and twice at the Don; at the first four he lost everything 
having no insurance, on the latter he had a small insurance but saved nothing. 


ANDREW F. MERCER was born in Toronto in 1851. His father, Andrew 
Mercer, sen'r, was born in Sussex, England, 1778. In 1802 he came to 
Canada with his father, whom he continued to live with up to the time of 
his death, which occurred June 24th, 1824. In 1803 Andrew Mercer, sen'r, 
received from the Government a grant of two hundred acres of land, which 
afterwards proved to be the most valuable property; in the same year he 
became a clerk in the Government Office. He was afterwards engaged in 
business as a general merchant on King Street, and subsequently kept a 
distillery at Hogg's Hollow, (York Mills). After giving up the distillery he 
was appointed issuer of marriage licenses, which position he held until his 
death in 1871. He had amassed a great fortune; he sold a portion of land 
between King and Wellington Streets, west of the Parliament Buildings, to 
the Rossin family for $20,000; at his death he held $90,000 stock in the 
Merchants' Bank; he was offered $60,000 cash for the place where he lived, 
near the south-east corner of Bay and \Vellington Streets. He gave a great 
deal for charitable purposes. After his death his estate reverted to the 
Crown, and the Government of Ontario, acting for the Crown, erected out 
of the estate an institution for the reclamation of fallen women known as 
the Andrew Mercer Reformatory at a cost of $90,000; also an eye and 
ear infirmary, known as the Andrew _Mercer Eye and Ear Infirmary, in 
connection with the Toronto General Hospital at a cost of $10,000, a small 
portion of the estate being allotted to Andrew F. Mercer. 



110 


Biographzcal Notices. 


THOMAS MEREDITH, retired, was born in the County Sligo, Ireland 
August 15th, 1812. His father was John Meredith, a linen draper, and his 
mother Mary McDonald. In 182 9 he came out with his brother John and 
located in Little York. He was first employed as a clerk in John Watkins' 
hardware store on King Street East. He was in partnership with Gooder- 
ham & Worts for ten years, and dealt a great deàl in grain which he 
brought from several of the ports on Lake Ontario. He married Susannah 
Ardagh, by whom he had the following children viz.: Arthur, Thomas, 
Richard, vVilliam, George, Sarah and Fanny. In religion Mr. Meredith is 
a member of the Church of England. 


HONOURABLE \VILLIAM H. MERRITT, St. Catharines. A biography of 
\Villiam Hamilton Merritt, of more than four hundred pages, has been 
published by his eldest son living, J. P. Merritt, therefore we propose to 
give only a brief sketch of his life in this work-briefer than would other- 
wise seem to answer our purpose. His father, Thomas Merritt, a Loyalist 
of the Revolutionary time, and a Cornet in the regiment known as Simcoe's 
Queen's Rangers, married Mary Hamilton, of South Carolina, left the 
United States with other Loyalists for New Brunswick in 1783, removed 
to Canada in 1793, and it was while on this journey that our subject was 
born in the State of New York, on the 3rd of July, 
793' The family 
settled on ,the Twelve-Mile Creek, in the old Niagara District. Here the 
boy, then three years old, grew to manhood and made his history. He 
commenced his education under 1\1r. Cockerell, at Burlington, now Ham- 
ilton, continuing his studies at Niagara, and receiving a slight classical 
p::>lishing at the h'ands of the Rev. John Burns. At fifteen years of age he 
visited St. John, New Brunswick, where he had relatives, and where he 
studied surveying, algebra, trigonometry and other useful branches. In 
June, 1812, when the United States declared war against Great Britain, he 
immediately drew his sword, having just receive:! a Lieutenant's commission. 
Three months later he was Major, and, at the Battle of Queenston Heights, 
October 13th, 1812, holding the position of Commander of Militia Cavalry of 
Upper Canada, he was deputed by General Sheafe to receive the swords of 
the American officers captured. He was in other engagements, including 
those at Detroit, for which he received a medal, at Stony Creek and 
Lundy's Lane, and during the latter engagement was taken prisoner. At 
the close of the war Mr. Merritt returned to St. Catharines, went into the 
commercial trade: and continued in trade until 1819. In 1818 he had a 
survey made of the land from the south branch of the Twelve-Mile Creek 
now at Allenburgh, due south two miles to the Chippewa, in order to see if 



City of Toro1lto. 


I II 


it was feasible to supply his mills by means of a canal with a full supply of 
water from the latter stream. This apparently trifling undertaking finally 
suggested to Mr. Merritt the more gigantic enterprise of connecting the 
waters of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, by means of a canal. This grand 
idea-the \Velland Canal-which he conceived, was commenced in November, 
182 4, and completed in November, 1829. It was the pioneer enterprise 
of the kind in Upper Canada. But Mr. Merritt's spirit was indomitable; 
he had noble coadjutors in the work, and it was done, giving Mr. Merritt a 
red-letter page of unsurpassed brilliancy in the history of Canadian enter- 
prise. In 1832 Mr. Merritt was elected to Parliament for Haldimand ; was 
placed on the Finance Committee, and served several years in that body, 
becoming chairman of the committee just mentioned, in January, 1838. 
He went into the Government as President of the Executive Council in 
18 4 8 , and was Chief Commissioner of Public \Vorks in 1850; sat for Hal- 
dimand and Lincoln until 1860, when he was elected to the Legislative 
Council for the Counties of Lincoln and \Velland. As a legislator he 
looked well to the interests of the \Velland Canal; was a strong advocate 
of internal improvements generally; took broad and statesmanlike views 
of all subjects coming up for consideration, and was one of the most 
industrious and useful members of Parliament. He was a strong advocate 
of the union of Upper and Lower Canada, a measure which was effecteà 
in 1841. During the period of his legislative career, the Rebellion occurred 
(1837-38), but Mr. Merritt entered into none of the military proceed- 
ings, designating the attempt at revolution as the Monkey VV' ar. In 
1840, Mr. Merritt, who had long been a Director of the \Velland Canal, 
was again elected President of the company, and continued to work with 
the utmost diligence for its interests. He was rightly regarded as the 
father of that grand public work. He favoured the building of the Welland 
Railway, which now runs along the side of the canal, knowing that both 
would aid in the development of the country. He took a liberal and 
comprehensive view of all such matters, and laboured untiringly to promote 
the welfare of Canada until his death, which occurred on the 5th July, 
1862. Thomas Rodman Merritt, the youngest of the three sons who grew 
to manhood, was educated at Grantham Academy and Upper Canada 
College; was a merchant at St. Catharines from 1844 to 1846; a miller for 
the next twenty-three years; a Director of the Niagara District Bank for 
more than twenty years and its President for several years; a member of 
the Dominion Parliament from 1868 to 1874, and is now Managing-Director 
of the Welland Railway, Vice-President of the Imperial Bank, and president 
of two or three local corporations or societies. "Rodman Hall," his home 
is one of the most elegant residences on the Niagara Peninsula. 



112 


BiograPhical Notices. 


JAMES METCALF, 174 Bloor Street \Vest, is a native of Cumberland, 
England, and is the eldest son of James Metcalf, contractor. In 1842 the 
subject of this sketch came to Toronto, and commenced business as con- 
tractor. Among the buildings erected by him, St. James' Cathedral bears 
testimony to his workmanship. He also built the old Post-office, Trinity 
College, and other public buildings. He went to Australia in 1852, and 
carried on business there for four years, and returning again to Toronto 
retired into private life. In 1867 l'v1:r. Metcalf was returned as a represen- 
tative in the House of Commons, and remained as such until 1878. He was 
elected President of the Royal Canadian Bank in 1865, and appointed a 
J.P. the year preVIOUS. In 1843 he married Miss Ellen Howson, daughter 
of John Howson, of Peterborough County, Ontario. 


JAMES MICHIE, deceased. Prominent among those names which have 
beenoassociated with the progress and development of Toronto the one which 
heads this sketch is especially worthy of mention. His death being of 
çomparatively recent occurrence, the citizens of Toronto will retain a 
vivid remembrance of the munificence which distinguished his lifetime, 
and the generous manner with which he caused his wealth to be disbursed 
for the benefit of the city charities and other public institutions on his 
demise. 1\1r. Michie was of Scotch birth and parentage, his home being 
Corryhoul, Strathdon, Aberdeenshire. He was born in 1828, and was the 
youngest of a family of seven children, the issue of the union of James and 
Sophia Michie. At the age of seventeen he came to Canada in company 
with his elder brother Henry, and entered the ,service of A. Ogilvie & Co., 
wholesale and retail grocers, of Toronto, in which house his uncle, the late 
Mr. George Michie, held a partnership, and to whose influence, doubtless, 
our subject was indebted for his entrance on a business career which 
eventually proved so strikingly successful. This business, with which the 
name of Michie is now so prominently connected, was first established in 
1836, with a branch in Montreal, the founders being Alexander Ogilvie and 
Thomas Kay, under whose name it was conducted until 1852. In that 
year Messrs. J ames Michie and A. T. Fulton were admitted into the firm, 
and with the great increase of business it was decided also to separate 
the wholesale department from the retail, which was accordingly done, the 
former being conducted by Messrs. George Michie and A. T. Fulton, on 
Y onge Street, and the retail business remaining on King Street, with the 
firm name of Fulton, Michie & Co., under the management of Mr. James 
Michie. The death of Mr. Kay in 1855 somewhat altered the position of 
affairs, that event being signalized by the closing of the Montreal branch, 



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DECEASED. ' 




City of Toronto. 


113 


and transference of all his business to Toronto, which was continued by 
the remaining partners until 1866 when Mr. George Michie died, the busi- 
ness being thereafter conducted by the two surviving members of the firm. 
On Mr. Michie's death in 1883 this flourishing concern passed into the 
hands of John F., George S., and Forbes Michie who compose the present 
firm, and the business is still carried on under the old style of Fulton, 
Michie & Co. Apart from his own particular business, which must of 
necessity have occupied the greater portion of his time and attention, Mr. 
Michie's business talents found scope in other departments where his 
knowledge of finance proved of no little value. He held at stated periods 
a directorship in the Bank of Commerce, the \Vestern Assurance Com- 
pany and the Dominion Telegraph Company, in the latter of which he 
combined also the position of treasurer; the vice-presidency of the Free- 
hold Loan and Savings Company, and likewise was a member of the Board 
of Trade. Before the \Vhitby, Port Perry, and Lindsay Railroad became 
amalgamated with the Midland, it had, for the preceding ten years, been 
owneq by l\Ir. Michie, his partner, l\1r. Fulton, and two other gentlemen, 
and was operated by them during that period, they having purchased it 
from the original proprietors. It would naturally be conceived that one in 
his position, and in whose competence his fellow-citizens had unbounded 
faith should scarcely have failed to respond to the many earnest solicitations 
with which he was assailed to accept municipal and political honours. 
But no, his inclinations did not tend that way, and all temptations held 
out to him of future distinction in that direction were modestly refused, to 
the disadvantage, we cannot help but think, of the governing bodies generally, 
where his habitual caution and knowledge of financial matters would have 
been of great service. \Ve have hitherto mentioned the success which 
attended Mr. Michie'
 business career, it is now our pleasing duty to record 
some of those benevolent actions which should keep his memory green in 
the minds of our citizens, and which bear full testimony to the general 
desire on his Pi- rt to benefit the inhabitants of the city. One act may be 
mentioned which of itself would show the generosity of his nature. His late- 
uncle, George Michie, originated the Home for Incurables, leaving a legacy 

f $2,000 to found the institution, provided an equal amount should be. 
given by the public within three years. In case they failed to comply the 
bequest was to revert to Mr. James Michie. The public failed to subscribe; 
the amount necessary within the specified time.. The deceased (who was. 
residuary legatee under the will) carried out his uncle's intentions and like- 
wise added the substantial sum of $4,000, and to him alone the foundation 
of the Home is due. His charitable disposition on many a memorable-- 
9 



114 


Biographical Notices. 


occasion was put to the test, and never found wanting, but it was reserved 
for Toronto to know, when she had lost hini, of what sterling quality was 
composed the mind of the man who had passed away, By his will he 
bequeathed tothe Toronto Hospital, $3,000 ; Lying-in-Hospital, $2,000; St. 
Andrew's Church, $4,000; Queen's College, Kingston, 54,000; \Vidows and 
Orphans 
4,000; Temporalities Fund, $4,000; Tract Society, 
5oo; Bible 
Society, $1,000; Magdalen Asylum, $2,000; Girls' Home, $2,000; Boys' 
Home, $2,000; House of Industry, $3,000, and the poor of the parish of 
Cargaff, Scotland, $200. As a true friend of the Church, l\Ir. Michie never 
neglected her interests, nay, he was profuse in his generosity in this respect; 
witness his magnificent contribution of $ I 1,000 towards the building fund 
of St. Andrew's Church (of which he was a devoted member), besides large 
donations for missionary and other purposes. He was appointed a member 
of the board of managers of his church in July, 1861, and was chairman of 
the building committee, in both of which positions he rendered valuable 
service. He was a member of the Council of Queen's College, Kingston, 
and at his death a resolution of condolence with his family, was passed 
by the college board. As one of Scotia's sons, he was ever true to the 
memory of his native land, and was always a steadfast friend to his country- 
men. Year after year they urged him to accept the presidency of St. 
Andrew's Society, of which he was a member, but his retiring disposition 
was opposed to the gratification of their desires. It was not until the annual 
meeting in 1881 that he was prevailed upon to allow his name to be used, 
and at the annual meeting previous to his death he was re-elected. In 
business circles he was respected for his integrity, and every reliance could 
be placed upon his word. Hé was alike remarkable for the simplicity of 
his character, as he was unaffected by his prosperity and accumulated 
wealth. \Vhat he gave, he gave freely, and his own happiness appeared 
bound up in the prospect of making others so. 
.. Oh, heaven! the good that some men do 
That others leave to do." 


He passed away beloved by his fellow-çountrymen, respected by all as a 
gentleman and a citizen. His remains were followed to Mount Pleasant 
Cemetery by thousands, both rich and poor, and buried beneath many floral 
offerings of the most eminent men of the city and province, a just and fitting 
tribute to the purity of his life. 
ROBERT BELL MILLE
, barrister, was born in 1814 and is the son of 
George Miller, a surgeon, who was educated in Edinburgh, Scotland, and 
who afterwards went to Ireland, where he married Mary Bell, third 



City of Toronto. 


115 


daughter of Dr. Bell. In 1820, the parents of our subject settled at 
Niagara with their family of five sons and two daughters, where Surgeon 
Miller lived until his death, which occurred in 1829; his wife died in 1841. 
Robert Bell Miller came to Toronto in 1829, and began business as a clerk 
in the store of Thomas Bell on King Street, where he remained until 18 34, 
during which five years he had been studying law. In 1839, he was 
admitted to the bar, and at once commenced the practice which he has 
ever since continued. Mr. Miller served in the" Queen's Rangers" at the 
time of the Rebellion, and witnessed the destruction of the Caroline. He is 
a Conservative, an Episcopalian and an Oddfellow of many years standing. 
He married Susannah, seventh child of the late Thomas Bell, of the Royal 
Engineers, and one of the old residents of Toronto. Both of Mr. Miller's 
sisters are still living; one in the Township of Ancaster, County of Went- 
worth, and the other at Niagara. 


FREDERICK MILLIGAN, deceased, was born in Chester, England, March 
25th, 1820. His father, Arthur l\Iilligan, was a soldier in her Majesty's 
71st Regiment; he came to Canada with the regiment in 1824; his wife 
and family came in 1830. He died here in 1861; his wife died in 1881. At 
the latter's death she left the following children: Frederick, Fanny, Alex- 
ander, Joseph, William, Robert and George. Frederick ::\Iilligan was 
married in 1842 to Margaret, daughter of John Bowman, by whom he had 
nine children. For some years he was a tailor, but in 1848 he opened a 
hotel called the Lord Roden and Colonel Verner. He died the 16th of 
May, 1883. At his death he left three daughters. 
JAMES MITCHELL, retired, was born in the County of Armagh, North of 
Ireland, in 18II, being the fourth in a family of four sons and one daughter, 
born to James and Sarah (Hamilton) Mitchell, of Scotch extraction. In 
1832 he came to Canada and located in York Township, where he engaged 
in lumbering and farming and also kept a stor:e at Eglinton. He remained 
there for over forty years and only a few years ago returned to the city, 
where he now resides. Mr. Mitchell married a daughter of Jacob Snider, 
Esq., by whom he has four sons and five daughters living. During the 
Mackenzie Rebellion he was arrested and detained for two days; he boarded 
at Montgomery's Hotel. l\1r. Mitchell's elder brother, Robert, who came to 
Canada in 1834, is now living retired in Harriston. 
GEORGE MONRO, deceased, ex-l\Iayor of Toronto, was born in Scotland 
in 1797. In 1800 his father emigrated to Canada, and settled at Niagara, 
where he resided until his death. After the close of the war of 1812, 



1I6 


Biographical Notices. 


George Monro removed from Niagara to York, where he entered the 
service of his brother John, who opened a general store between George 
and Frederick StreéÌs on King, afterwards on the corner of George and 
King Streets. On the death of his brother in 1830, he assumed control of 
the business which he continued until 1869, when he retired. From 18 34 
until 18 4 1 he represented St. Lawrence Ward in'the City Council. In 
18 4 1 he was elected Mayor, which office he filled most satisfactorily. From 
18 4 2 until 18 45 he again represented St. Lawrence \tVard in the Council. 
In 18 44-5 he represented the third Riding of York, now East York, in the old 
Parliament of Canada. During the Rebellion of 1837, he was commissioned 
a captain of the York Volunteers. His wife was Christina Fisher of Mon- 
treal. Mr. l\rlonro died in 1879, leaving two sons and four daughters, 
some of whom reside in Toronto. 


GEORGE MONRO, }UN'R, son of the late ex-Mayor Monro, was born in 
the building now known as the Black Horse Hotel in Toronto in 18 31. 
He spent some years in business with his father. He was subsequently 
educated as a Civil Engineer, and was employed on the construction of the 
Toronto and Guelph line of the Grand Trunk Railway. For the past 
fourteen years he has been connected with Her Majesty's Customs at 
Toronto. 


JOHN l\rl. MONRO, eldest son of the late ex-Mayor Monro, was born at 
York in 1828. In 1862 he went to Australia, where he remained nine years. 
In 1861 he went to England and Ireland, where he travelled for three years. 
He then returned to Toronto, where he has since remained. He resides at 
the Queen's Hotel. 


ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY, carriage manufacturer, 838 Queen Street 
\Vest, was born in Markham Township, a little east of Y onge Street, near 
Hogg's Hollow, now York Mills, November 1st, 1835. His father, Richard 
Montgomery, a brother of John Montgomery, who played such a prominent 
part in the Rebellion of 1837, was born in February, 180 7, east of York 

1ills, and died August 14th, 1873. His wife was Hannah, daughter of 
John Smith, by whom he had the following children, all of whom survived 
him: Jane, born December 6th, 1832; John S., March 4 th , 18 34; Alex- 
ander, November 1st, 1835; Nathan M., July 23rd, 18 37; Sarah Ann, 
September loth, 1839; Martha, August 31st, 1841; Joseph, May 11th, 
18 43; Nancy, June 21st, 1845; David, May 25th, 18 47; Mary E., July 
22nd, 18 49; Mahala, June 20th, 1850; Jerusha, May 6th, 18 53; Victoria, 
May 23rd, 1855; Charles A., August loth, 1857. The mother of these 



City of Toronto. 


117 


children was born near Thornhill, April 28th, 1812, and died October 14th, 
1883. Alexander Montgomery began to learn the trade of a carriage- 
maker and general blacksmith when he was quite young; he has been 
manufacturing carriages for twenty-five years. In 1866, he married Mary 
Anne, daughter of Joseph Peelar. The Peelars were U .E. Loyalists, and 
settled west of the Hooton in 1800. Mary Ann Hooton, the great grand- 
mother of Mrs. Montgomery was drowned while crossing that river on 
horseback. Mrs. Montgomery's grand-mother lived to be eighty-four years 
of age. She had a narrow escape from being shot during the Battle of 
York in 1812, while walking across Bloor Street with her son, then an 
infant in her arms. 


DR. JOHN W. MONTGOMERY, son of John and Mary Montgomery, was 
born at Newtonbrook, Ontario, in 1827. Hence he was only ten years of 
age when the Rebellion broke out, at which time he and his cousin 
(Abraham Wilson) were the only persons in the old hotel, the" Sickle and 
Sheaf," owned by his father, when the first cannon shot came through his 
home, cutting down the three chimneys. These two lads stood viewing 
the scene from one of the upper windows; they thought it mere sport until a 
second shot entered the wing, when they were removed by some of their 
friends. After the Rebellion closed, and his father made his escape to the 
United States, his family joined him at Rochester, N.Y. Here our subject 
attended the Collegiate Institute until 1843, when the family returned to 
Toronto. He entered the private medical school taught by the late 
Dr. John Rolph; where he graduated in 1847. During his medical course 
he was offered, by a vote of his class, the position of Demonstrator of 
Anatomy, which he accepted. After completing his education, he practised 
at Sutton Village, Ontario, twenty-five years. In 1872, he removed to Bell 
Ewart, Simcoe County, where he remained until 1877, when he received the 
appointment of assistant superintendant in the Kingston Insane Asylum, 
where he remained five years. In 1882 he was transferred to the Hamilton 
Insane Asylum, where he at present resides. In politics he has always 
been a strong Reformer. His first wife was Josephine Gorham, of the 
city of New York; second, Elizabeth Anderson, of Hawick, Scotland; 
his third, Charlotte, daughter of \Villiam Jones, Esq., of Kingston, Ontario. 
He has four sons and three daughters. 


EDWARD M. MORPHY, jeweller, was born in the North of Ireland in 
1820, and emigrated to Canada in 1835, in company with his master, he 
being at that time an apprentice. In 1837, his father, mother, six brothers 



118 


Biographical Notices. 


and three sisters followed him, all of whom settled in Toronto. During the 
Mackenzie Rebellion his father and elder brothers were among the first to 
volunteer to support the loyal cause, the former being appointed captain of 
a city corps. Three of his brothers entered the legal profession, one 
entered the Civil Service and two besides himself became jewellers. Mr. 
l\Iorphy has been established at 141 Y onge Street for over forty years; his 
family consists of five children, two sons and three daughters; the eldest 
son, Mr. J. l\lorphy, is now in partnership with the father under the style 
of Morphy, Sons & Co. The eldest daughter is married to Mr. E. J. Malone
 
of the firm of Edgar & Malone, barristers. The family have built over 
fifty first class houses in Toronto. 


HUGH ANGUS MORRISON, railway conductor, was born in Toronto in 
18 3 0 , being the youngest in a family of three daughters and one son. His 
father was Hugh Morrison, who was born in Scotland in 1798, and who, 
after resigning his captaincy in the "Black \Vatch" Highland regiment, 
came to Canada in 1829 with Sir John Colborne. He was then a widower, 
with five children, his first wife, Mary Curran, having died in Scotland. 
The Honourable Justice Morrison is the eldest of his sons, by his first 
marriage; the others were Angus and Michael; the daughters were Betsey 
and Jeanette. After coming to Canada he married a daughter of Captain 
Alexander Montgomery, by whom he had four children. He first engaged 
in farming, and subsequently kept a hotel on Y onge Street. The subject of 
this sketch has been engaged on railways for twenty-four years. He began 
as baggage man and is now a conductor running between Toronto and 
London. In 1863 he married Sarah Jane Ferris, of Toronto. 
FREDERICK 1\11. MORSON (of Bigelow & Morson, barristers) was born at 
Cham by, Quebec, and is the only son of Frederick Morson, M.D., of Niagara, 
Ontario, and a native of Rochester, Kent, England. In 1845, Mr. Morson, 
senior, came to Canada and settled in Montreal, where he practised his 
profession as M.D., removing in 1860 to Niagara, his present residence. 
F. :\1. Morson was educated at Niagara Grammar School, and graduated 
with honors at Trinity College, Toronto, in 1872. He was called to the 
the bar in 1877, and in that year entered on the practice of his profession at 
Hamilton, and in 1878 in Toronto. In 1878, he married Miss Catherine 
\Vyatt, eldest daughter of the late George \Vyatt, Esq., of this city. 


ALEXANDER MUIR was born in the Parish of Lesmahagow, Lanark- 
shire, Scotland. His father, John Muir, came to Canada in 1833, accom- 
panied by his wife and two sons, Alexander and John, arriving at Toronto 



City of Toronto. 


119 


(then Little York), in the month of August of that year. Shortly after his 
arrival, he took up his residence in the Township of Scarboro', where he 
lived till his death in 1865. Alexander is now a resident of Toronto, being 
Headmaster of one of the city public schools. His brother John is Treasurer 
of the Chicago Academy of Music. 


HECTOR MUNRO, deceased, father of L. H. R. Munro, was born at 
Dornoch, Scotland, in 1796. He came to Canada in 1812 with the 49th 
Regiment, being a brother officer of Sir Allan McNab. He participated in 
the battles of Chrysler's Farm, Queenston Heights, and Lundy's Lane, 
and carried the colours at Chrysler's Farm. After the war he retired on 
half-pay; and, when again placed on full pay, was stationed at St. John's, 
Newfoundland, from which he removed to Toronto, having been transferred 
to the Royal Canadian Rifles. He subsequently filled the position of 
Collector of Customs at Galt, until 1854, when he died, leaving eight 
children. His son, George T. Munro, who had been retired as a captain on 
half pay on the disbanding of the Royal Canadian Rifle Regiment with his 
wife and child and youngest sister were lost at sea on one of the Allan 
vessels the H azeldean, in 1870. 


RICHARD H. R. MUNRO, barrister, was born in 1840 at St. John's, 
Newfoundland, where his father Hector Munro, an officer in the Royal 
Newfoundland veteran companies, was stationed. He came to Toronto 
with his parents, and after having studied law in the office of the Hon. 
Edward Blake, graduated in 1867. He formed a partnership with \Vm. 
Proudfoot of Hamilton, which continued until 1870. Mr Munro married a 
daughter of James BarIJ.um, of Grafton, Ontario. 
JOHN MURCHISON, deceased, was born in 1878 in Glengarry, (whither 
his father, one of the U. oE. Loyalists, fled from New York (he was a 
descendant of the Macdonalds of Glenco, Scotland). He went to Niagara 
when only thirteen years old;' from thence he came to York in 1800 in a 
small boat, and started in business as a merchant tailor on King Street, 
where the Clyde Hotel now stands. In 1808 he was married in the old 
English Church to Frances E., daughter of Joseph Hunt, Commissary officer. 
He served in the War of 1812, in the York Volunteers, and was appointed 
sergeant-major; he was in the Battle of Queenston Heights, after which 
he wa
 sent by the Governor with three of the prisoners from Niagara to 
Kingston in a small boat, having only two assistants. His eldest son John 
was among those who marched to quell the rebels at Montgomery's Farm in 
18 37. He represented St. Lawrence Ward in the City Council; he was a 



120 


Bz'ographical Notices. 


Conservative and member of the Church of England. In 1838, he retired 
from business and lived in the present homestead which he built in 1836 on 
Cruickshank Lane, now Bathurst Street, being the only house on the street 
except Mr. Cruickshank's farm-house. He died in 1870, leaving of nine 
children only three living viz.: Sarah, now aged 72, Charlotte, aged 68 and 
Richard Duncan, aged 62, who for several years was in business on Queen 
Street. The latter, at his father's death, removed to the homestead where 
he is now living; he had been married twice, first in 1847, and second in 
1861 ; he had seven children by his first wife, five of whom are living, and 
eight by the second, all living; of the first children, the three eldest are 
married in Toronto. In politics Mr. Murchison is a Conservative, and in 
religion a member of the Church of England. 


JAMES MURRAY was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1814' In early life 
he acquired the trade of a tinsmith, and on coming to Toronto in 1842, 
commenced a business which he conducted successfully until 1874. He 
subsequently purchased property on Alexander Street, where he now lives 
retired. He married Jane, daughter of Alexander Miller, by whom he has 
two sons who have succeeded him in the business still carried on at 224 
Yonge Street. Mr. ::\lurray is a member of the Carlton Street Methodist 
Church, and in politics sympathises with the Reform Party. 


EDWARD J. MUSSON, of the finn of Mackenzie, Musson & Co., Toronto, 
was born at \Veston, June 24, 1834. His father, Edward Musson, was 
born in London, England, and emigrated to Canada in 1820. He bought 
up land in the Township of Etobicoke near \Veston, where he and his 
brother Thomas, engaged in farming, saw-mill and distillery business. In 
1840 he removed to Islington and carried on farming, saw-milling and store- 
keeping, he creditably filled the offices of Township Clerk, Councillor and 
Reeve; he died in 1871. His wife was Ann, daúghter of John Smart, whom 
he married in 1831, and by whom he had eight children. Edward J. 
Musson was educated at Islington, Toronto Academy and Upper Canada 
College. In 1853 he went to Brampton to learn store-keeping with the 
late Mr. Peleg Howland. From i8SS to 1863 he kept a store at Thistleton ; 
after which he was farming and store-keeping at \Veston. In 1875 he 
came to Toronto. He is married to a Miss Taylor. He is a Conservative, 
an Episcopalian, and a member of the York Pioneer Society. 


\\TILLIAM IVlusSON, deceased, was born in London, England, III the 
year 1799. He came to Canada in the year 1820 with his wife (l\lary Ann 
Wordley), father, mother, and two brothers (Thomas and Edward). The 



City of Toronto. 


121 


family settled at Weston, where the father died in the year 1832, aged 
eighty-seven years, and the mother in the year 1846, aged seventy-seven 
years. The father was a manufacturer of tin-plate in London, England, 
and a member of the "Goldbeaters' Guild" of that city. William, the 
subject of our sketch, removed to Toronto (then Little York), and carried 
on the business of tin-plate manufacturer and importer of hardware until 
his death in 1844. He had twelve children, five of whom died in infancy, 
the others being Mary Ann, \Villiam, Henry, Isabella, James W. George, 
and Charles S. He was one of the founders of the Mechanics' Institute, 
and Captain of the old Fire Brigade. He was also one of the first Directors 
of the British America Assurance Company. In politics he was a Baldwm 
Reformer. His wife, Mary Ann Wordley, died at Toronto in the year 1872, 
in the sixty-ninth year of her age. 


GEORGE MUSSON, son of William and Mary Ann Musson, was born at 
71 King Street East, on 3rd November, 1836. He was educated at the 
Toronto Academy and the Upper Canada College, and with the exception 
of two years (1867 to 1869), has always resided in Toronto. He married 
Agnes, third daughter of John Balfour. He was for many years with the 
well-known firm of Wakefield, Coate & Co., but since 1869 has been engaged 
in business on his own account. His firm, Musson & 110rrow, 50 Front 
Street East, tea importers and commission merchants, doing a very large 
business, their prinçipal connections being with China, Brazil and the 
West Indies. In 1883, Mr. Musson was appointed Vice-Consul for Brazil. 
In politics he is a c.onservative. 


GEORGE MussoN, deceased, 37 Carlton Street, whose grandfather was 
a manufacturer of tin-plate in London, England, and came to Canada with 
his wife and sons (William, Thomas and Edward), in 1820. There was a 
daughter who married in England, and who came out a few years after- 
wards. The family settled on some land near Weston, where the father 
and mother died. The father of our subject had learned the tin-plating 
trade in England, and began business in that line in York soon after he 
came out; he continued it until 1844, when he died. He was connected 
with the old Fire Brigade, and was one of the founders of the Mechanics' 
Institute. He was one of the first stock-holders in the British America 
Insurance Company. 


MUNGO NASMITH, tax colleetor for St. James's Ward, residing at 16 
Maitland Street, was born in Greenock, Scotland, and is a son of the late 
John Nasmith, who came to Canada in 1844 and for many years conducted 



122 


Biographical Notices. 


a bakery in Toronto. 1\1 ungo early learned his father's trade, and carried 
on business for himself at the corner of Y onge and Gerrard Streets from 
1860 to 1872. Retiring from business on account of his health he received 
the appointment of collector for St. James's \Vard, a position he still retains. 
Following in the footsteps of his father, he early took an active part in 
temperance work, and was a charter member of the Cadets of Temperance 
when first introduced into Canada. For five years he held the position of 
Treasurer of the Grand Lodge of Good Templars; he was also one of the 
Vice-Presidents of the Dominion Alliance. At the organization of the 
\Vorld's Good Templars he was appointed the Deputy of the R. W. G. T. 
:\1 allins, and is still an earnest total abstainer. 


RICHARD N ORTHCOTE, retired, was born in Devonshire, England, in 
1804, and is now tIle only one living of a family of sixteen. His father was 
Henry Northcote, a farmer. In 1826, he came to Canada as a butler in 
the service of Sir John Colborne. After which he engaged in the grocery 
business on King Street, and subsequently in making ginger beer; he sold 
the latter business to the Hon. Robert Baldwin. After -the Rebellion, he 
opened a grocery store on King Street, where Thompson & Son's dry-goods 
house now is; by two fires which occurred while he was there he lost 
-[2,0C;>0. He then commenced a wholesale pork business, which he con- 
tinued until his retirement in 184-9. In politics he is a Conservative, and 
in religion a member of the Church of England. He married a Miss 
Taylor, who also came out with Sir John Colborne. His son, Henry 
Northcote, a civil engineer, was born in York, November 4, 1833. He 
received his education at Upper Canada College. He married Julia, third 
daughter of Richard Hackin. 


THOMAS NORTHEY, of the firm of Northey & Co., manufacturers of 
steam-pumps, was born in Cornwall, England, in 1816, being the eldest of 
a family of five sons and five daughters born to George and Mary (Black) 
Northey. About 1826, he came to Canada with his parents, who settled 
on Prince Edward Island, where they remained for six years. Then he 
went to Pittsburg, Pa., where he learned the trade of a mechanical 
engineer. In 1838, the term of his apprenticeship having expired, he 
returned to Canada, and after working ten years at \Vellington Square and 
Simcoe located at Hamilton, where, until 1880, he was engaged in building 
stationary steam-engines and subsequently in making steam-pumps. In 
1882, he removed to Toronto, where, at the corner of Front and Parlia- 
ment Streets, the firm of which he is a member is doing a prosperous 



City of Toronto. 


12 3 


business. In 1876, he patented a steam-pump, which has proved a great 
success. In 1846, he married l'vlatilda Williams, daughter of Mr. Williams, 
of Seneca townshìp, who subsequently died. In 1856, he married Julia 
Henrietta Pell, daughter of J. E. Pell. Mr. Northey's parents died in 
Hamilton; he has three brothers living, one in l\Ielbourne, Australia, and 
two in Hamilton. He is a Conservative in politics. 


RICHARD H. OATES, deceased, the founder of the " York Pioneers 
Society," was the son of Captain Oates, a commander in the merchant 
service, trading between England and the \Vest Indies. Shortly after his 
marriage, Captain Oates made a voyage to the VVest Indies. On the return 
Toyage he was compelled to put into Belfast, instead of London, whither 
they were bound. This occurred on July the 27th, 1809, on which date 
Richard H. Oates was born. His early life was, if not romantic, at least 
very eventful. \Vhile accompanying his parents to Malta in his father's 
vessel the America, and when Richard was scarce a year old, they were 
captured in the Mediterranean by a French privateer and carried as prison- 
ers of war to Algiers. Fortunately, the British consul of that place happened 
to be an old school-mate of Captain Oates; and by visiting the prisoners 
relieved the monotony of their captivity until, by an exchange of prisoners, 
they regained their freedom. Captain Oates, being in the Commissariat 
Department, was ordered to Oporto, 
here his son Richard, then two years 
of age, was carried off and concealed for some weeks by a Portuguese 
nobleman, who had taken a fancy to him; he was found, however, in good 
health and spirits, and could prattle somewhat in Portuguese. In 1812 
and 1813, he travelled with his father through France and Spain, and, in 
1814, returned with him to England. Captain Oates was then ordered to 
Quebec; and while in Canada visited Little York, when his cousin, Miss 
Russell, sister of President Russell, prevailed upon him to return to Eng- 
land for his family and to settle in Canada, which he did in 1817. He 
afterwards became prominent in connection with the packet Rzchmolld, 
which he built and sailed between Niagara and Toronto. As Richard 
Oates was but eight years of age when he came to Canada, he was sent to 
school to the late Dr. Strachan. He also attended school at Niagara, St. 
Catharines and Brockville, after which he returned to Toronto and served 
two years as an apprentice to the drug business. In 1828, he went to 
England, where he finished his studies for his profession. Returning to 
Toronto he opened a drug store; but finding it not as profitable as he 
could wish he invested his capital in a foundry with Christopher Elliot. 
He afterwards went into the mill-stone business and built a mill at Brad- 



12 4 


Biographical Notices. 


ford, by which he lost $18,000. The mill-stone business occupied his 
attention until his death, which occurred on March 2, 1881. At the 
beginning of this sketch reference has been made to Mr. Oates as being the 
founder of the" York Pioneers Society." It is to his efforts that the Society 
owes its existence. It was organized for the purpose of collecting and 
preserving relics and historical momentoes of old times. The membership 
was confined to those who had lived in Torónto before March 6, 18 34, 
on which date Little York became Toronto; subsequently those descend- 
ants of pioneers who had reached forty years of age were admitted. The 
society has been a certain success, much of which is due to Mr. Oates. 
In politics Mr. Oates was a Conservative, and in religion a Unitarian. He 
was President of the United Canadian Association for five years, and in 
January, 1880, was elected to a seat in the City Council as Alderman for 
St. James's \Vard. 


DANIEL O'BROOK, retired, was born on the corner of King and Church 
Streets in this city, September 15, :Ji825. His father, whose name was 
also Daniel, came out to Canada some years before 1800 with his father, 
who was a merchant in Norwich, England. The grandfather of our subject 
afterwards became a captain in the 41st Regiment, and fought at the battle 
of Queenston Heights. Daniel O'Brook, sen'r, married a daughter of John 
Playter, by whom he had three sons, George, John Edward and Daniel. He 
purchased a lot at the corner of King and Church Streets, and on it built a 
house. He died ill 1872, aged eighty years. George O'Brook lives in 
Toronto, while John Edward resides in Chatham. 


DR. OLDRIGHT is descended from nulitary ancestors. His grand- 
father was a burgher of the ancient German free city of Frankfort-on- 
the-Main. He having contracted a second marriage, his son left home 
and joined the British army, when Napol
on Bonaparte's military genius 
was contributing to the overthrow of the ancient dynasties of Europe. 
The father of Dr. Oldright was born in London, England. His mother 
was Elizabeth Clucas, whose father was from the Isle of Man. Dr. 
Oldright's father, when very young, joined His Majesty's 81st Regiment of 
Foot, the Loyal Lincoln Volunteers. This corps, like other regiments of 
the line, has, in consequence of the extent of the British possessions, seen a 
great deal of foreign service. Major Oldright was forty-two years in the 
army, and travelled over a large portion of the globe. Soon after the great 
battle of \Vaterloo he served with his corps in the Army of Occupation in 
France, pending the complete restoration of peace and the return of the 



City of Toronto. 


12 5 


Bourbons. He afterwards accompanied his regiment to different stations 
in the West India Islands and British North America, besides having done 
. 
duty in Great Britain, and in the Mediterranean and Ireland. He finally 
retired upon full pay with the rank of major. His son, Dr. \Villiam Old- 
right, was born at St. Kitt's, West Indies, in 1842. During the early part 
of his life he accompanied his father to different countries with the regi- 
ment. In 1854, after his father's retirement, he resided a short time in 
London, England, and in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and for a couple of years 
upon a small farm formerly belonging to the old warrior Brant, adjoining 
the old Mohawk Church near Brantford. He attended the Brantford High 
School until seventeen years of age; when he entered University College, 
and graduated at the University in modern languages in 1863, and in 
medicine in 1865. He began practic.e at Walkerton, Ontario, remaining 
two years; after which he returned to Toronto in 1867, where he has since 
been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. He became a 
member of the Medical Council, and in 1869, when he retired from that 
body, þecame Lecturer on Sanitary Science in the Toronto School of 
Medicine. In 1873 he was elected a member of the Senate of the Toronto 
University. In 1882 he was appointed Chairman of the Provincial Board 
of Health. His term of office as Chairman expired in April, 1884, when 
he was re-appointed a member of the Board. In 1865 he married Sarah 
Ellen, daughter of Charles Durand, Esq., of this city. 


WILLIAM T. O'REILLY, M.D., was born at Niagara Falls in 1834, being 
the eldest in a family of two sons and one daughter. His father was 
William O'Reilly, the youngest son of a family of six sons and five 
daughters, and was born in the same place and the same house as his 
son. In the year 1800, he married a daughter of Stiles Stevens, aU. E. 
Loyalist, who came to Canada from Boston; by her he had two sons and 
one daughter, viz.: William T., Helen and Hamilton; he died in Oakville 
in 1846. The grandfather of our subject, John O'Reilly, came from Bal- 
trasna, in the County of Cavan, Ireland, in 1745, to Philadelphia, where 
he became the President of the University of Pennsylvania. In 1786 he 
came to Canada and settled at Niagara Falls, where as a U.E. Loyalist he 
drew land for himself and sons, and where he died in 1815. He and five 
of his sons, served during the \Var of 1812, and fought at Queenston 
Heights and Lundy's Lane. Dr. O'Reilly attended Upper Canada 
College in 1847-8-9, and graduated in medicine in 1856. He then practised 
in St. Mary's for a short time, but returned to Toronto in 1859, and now 
occupies the position of Inspector of Prisons and Public Charities for the 
Province of Ontario. 



126 


Biographical Notices. 


PETER PATERSON, hardware merchant, 
was born in Toronto, May 3 0 , 
1834. His parents were David and 'Sarah (Bishop) Paterson. His grand- 
father, Peter Paterson, came to Canada from Blantyre, Scotland, in 18r9, 
wit
 his sons David, John, and Peter. He settled at once in Toronto, 
and started in the hardware business the same year in the old Market 
Square, which he continued, with his son David as partner, until his death 
in 1846. Dayid continued the business until r856, when he died. and 
was succeeded by his sons Peter and John. Peter, since his brother John's 
death in 1880, has carried on the business alone. In 1861 .he was married 
to Jane VV., eldest daughter of David Paterson, of St. John, N .B. 


R. G. _..\.. PATON, cashier in the Toronto Custom House, was born at 
St. Andrews, Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1830. His father, Alexander Paton, 
died in Scotland; his mother was Violet \Vilson. In 1833 his mother came 
to Canada with her family, Jessie, Elizabeth. \Villiam and Robert. William 
died in 1845. His mother died in 1872, aged eighty-two years. R. G. A. 
Paton was educated in Toronto, at what was called the York Academy. 
kept by Mr. James Hodgson. He was on the British Colonist newspaper 
for ten years. For the last thirty years he has been in the Custom House. 
In religion Mr. Paton is a Presbyterian. 


JOHN PATRICK, Superintendent \Vater \Vorks, Parkdale, is a native of 
N ewcastle-on- Tyne, England, being the second son of George Patrick, a 
baker of that town, who married Jane Laidlaw. In r868 John Patrick 
came to Toronto, and was employed at the Soho Foundry as foreman, and 
at the time the \Vater \V orks were established in Parkdale, took charge as 
Superintendent. 
ALEXANDER PATTERSO:'-l was born in Belfast, Ireland in 1834, and in 
1849 emigrated to Canada, and was engaged in lumbering until r855. He 
then went to Oakville, and engaged in the grocery and dry goods business, 
which he conducted for two years, afterwards continuing the grocery 
business in Toronto. He remained at 295 Y onge Street about twenty-two 
years, and then retired from business in 1879, since living in retirement. 
In 1857 he married Miss Charlotte Hazelhurst, a daughter of Benjamin 
Hazelhurst of Peterboro', the issue of the union being one son and two 
daughters, all of whom reside in the city. 
JOHN PATTERSON, retired, was born in Belfast, Ireland, and came to 
Toronto with his parents when only two years of age. In his youth he 
learned the trade of printer, which occupation he followed for twenty-five 



City of Toronto. 


12 7 


years. In 1875 he took possession of the hotel at the corner of Agnes and 
Elizabeth Streets, which he conducted with success for a period of seven years, 
selling out to Mr. Taylor, the present proprietor, in 1882, He is a retired 
Captain of the loth Royals, having joined at the time of the Fenian Raid. 


THOMAS PATTERSON, retired, was born in Ireland in 1834; and at the 
age of twenty he emigrated to Canada and took up his residence in Toronto. 
On his arrival he joined the city police force, in which he remai
ed four 
years. He then entered the service of the Grand Trunk Railway, and was 
stationed at Belleville in the capacity of policeman. On his return to 
Toronto some time afterwards, he again joined the city police, but subse- 
quently returned to the employment of the Grand Trunk, and was stationed 
at the Union Station, where he continued until 1861. About this time he 
engaged in the grocery and liquor business at 230 Queen Street East, but 
stayed only a short time, opening a hotel and feed store on the corner of 
Queen and Ontario Streets. He continued this. business until 1879, and 
then built the Prospect House, 266 Queen Street East, since which time he 
has lived retired at No. 81 Ontario Street. In 1859 Mr. Patterson married 
Miss Jane Byers, of Toronto, by whom he has three children liv'ing; she 
died in 1873. He was married a second time, his wife being Miss Beatty of 
Toronto, by whom he has one daughter living. 
BENJAMIN PEARSALL, silversmith, is the son of Samuel and Amelia 
(Lewis) Pearsall, who came to Canada from Bristol, England, in 1800, and 
located in Little York, where they took a house on Duke Street. His father, 
who was a blacksmith and engineer' by trade, was one of the first black- 
smiths in the town. For two years he was employed by the Corporation 
as an engineer. He met his death by drowning in 1853, with his two sons 
named Louis Haliburton and Leurx, while the three were returning from a 
shooting excursion to the Island. He left three sons and thre
 daughters. 
Benjamin Pearsall was born in 1847, in a house on King Street, east of 
Parliament Street. He married Isabella, third daughter of Frank Woods, 
of this city. His first wife dying he married Henrietta, daughter of John 
Smith, of Toronto. 


GEORGE PEARSALL, locksmith, son of Samuel and Amelia Pearsall, was 
born in Toronto in 1840. He learned his trade with J. J. Taylor & Co., 
and began business for himself at 417 Y onge Street, repairing locks and 
filing saws, in February, 1871, and is now carrying on the hardware busi- 
ness in connection with the jobbing department. He married Isabella 
Maysonholder, of German extraction, who was born in the Province of 
Quebec. 



128 


Biographical Notices. 


ELIHU PEASE, deceased. The Pease family are of English origin, their 
name having been common in England for the past three hundred years. 
A work published there as early as 1472, mentions the name of John Pease, 
L.L.D.; persons of this name were found in al1 ranks of society, ministers, 
bankers, members of Parliament, etc. An English historian ascribes to 
them a German origin, and by a coat of arms we find the English Pease in 
Germany as early as A.D. 971. The great-grandfather of our subject, 
Samuel Pease, was born at Enfield, Conn., his ancestors having emigrated 
to America from I pswich, England, with the Puritans, in the ship Francis, 
which landed at Boston, April, 1634-, from which place they subsequently 
removed to Enfield, Conn., where our subject was born, June 29, 17 8 1. 
He was educated for a civil engineer and land surveyor. In 1810 he came 
to York County, and settled at Thornhill, where he soon after began 
teaching school in a log building erected in 1811, which is still standing, it 
being the first school-house in the County of York. During the War of 
1812, all aliens were compelled to take the oath of allegiance or leave the 
country, hence Mr Pease returned to Buffalo, where he served in the Post- 
office and Custom House until the war closed, after which he returned to 
York, and assisted in re-building the old garrison. He later followed 
school teaching at Newtonbrooke until 1821, when he returned to Buffalo, 
and he was employed as manager in a tannery for the late Jesse Ketchum 
for a period of two years. He then returned to York and located opposite 
the Golden Lion Hotel, Y onge Street, and took the oath of allegiance. He 
purchased fifteen acres of land and erected a tannery which he conducted 
until his death in 1854. In 1820 he married Catharine, daughter of Jacob 
Cummer (a pioneer of York who emigrated from Reading, Penn.), by whom 
he left four children. Edward, the second child of Elihu Pease, was born 
at York, September 15, 1824-, and entered his father's tannery at the age 
of fifteen, remaining until 1847, afterwards removing to the Township of 
King; where he purchased fifteen acres of land on lot 6, concession 5. A 
year later he erected the second tannery in the Township of King, which 
he conducted eight years, and then returned to Lansing, and lived on the old 
home where he was eight years farming. He subsequently went to Aurora, 
where he was again engaged in the tanning business for sixteen years. He . 
came to Toronto in 1880, and is at present located at 25 Front Street East, 
where he and his two sons are engaged as leather merchants. \Vhile Mr. 
Edward Pease was a resident of the Township of King he sat three years 
in Township Council, also three years in the Town Council of Aurora. In 
politics he is a Reformer; in religion a member of the Methodist Church. 
In 1846 he married Sarah, eldest daughter of Samuel Castle, from Her- 



City of Toronto. 


12 9 


kimer County, N.Y., who had settled in the Township of Vaughan; by 
whom he has four sons and three daughters. Two of his sons, Joseph and 
Elihu are engaged with him in business. 


R. W. PHIPPS, son of Thomas Phipps, jun'r, whose father settled 
m Toronto in 1817, is a gentleman well-known throughout the Dominion 
as a writer on Political Economy and other subjects. His writings in 
fa vour of the National Policy were largely circulated by the Conserva- 
tive Party prior to the election of 1878, and aided in determining the 
result of that contest. He however left the party on the ground that the 
old Cabinet should not have been brought into power without an inter- 
mixture of the men who had been associated with the new ideas which had 
gained them the victory. In Provincial matters Mr. Phipps has been a 
supporter of the 1\lowat Administration. He is now employed by the 
Ontario Government on the subject of forest preserv
tion, his first report 
on which h
s been received with remarkable favour by the Canadian and 
American press, and has attracted attention in Great Britain. Mr. Phipps's 
writings in prose and poetry have been contributed principally to news- 
. papers, magazines and pamphlets. 
THOMAS PHIPPS, deceased, one of the early settlers of Lit1:le York, 
emigrated to Canada from London, England, in 1817. For some years he 
cultivated a farm a few miles north of Toronto; but, having been a merchant 
in England and unused to such a rough life, he took no active part in 
clearing the land. He did not succeed as a f
rmer. and went back to 
England; but, again returning to Canada, died here. He was twice married, 
having by his first marriage one son, Thomas, who died in 1
59' By his 
second marriage he had four sons and several daughters. Of the sons, the 
eldest, \Villiam, a well-known banker and broker, died a few-years ago; the 
other sons, Frederick, George and John, are still living, the two last being 
citizens of Toronto. 


WILLIAM PICKARD is a native of Beverly, Yorkshire, England, and 
was born in 1827. He came to Canada in 1856, locating in Toronto, where 
he has resided ever since. He was by trade a cooper, which occupation he 
followed for some three years, after which he engaged in the milk business, 
from which he retired in 1883. Mr. Pickard commenced with but one cow,. 
and his success may be noted from the fact that ç>n giving up business he 
had twenty-five head of cattle. In 1856 he married Miss Isabella Tait, of 
Aberdeenshire, Scotland, by whom he has two sons and two daughters,. 
three of whom are living in this city, and one in Chicago. 
10 



13 0 


Biograpkical Notices. 


NOAH L. PIPER, deceased, was born in Berlin, Connecticut, U.S., in 
181 5. His father, Luther Piper, was of English extraction, and was a 
cooper by trade. In 1831 he and his eldest brother, Hiram, came to 
Canada and settled in Little York. He spent five years in learning the tin- 
smith trade with his brother, and was afterwards manager of the business. 
Eight years later he entered into partnership with his brother and continued 
business with him until 1863, when he formed a partnership in the house- 
furnishing business with his SOl'1, Edward. He retired from business in 
18 75, and died 12th January, 1884. His brother, Hiram, was born in 1805, 
and died in 1866. On January 3, 1838, Noah L. Piper married Sarah, 
second daughter of Robert Spencer, by whom he had three sons, Henry, 
Edward and Hiram, and one daughter Emeline Elizabeth, who married 
M. A. Thomas, of this city. In politics he was a Conservative, and in 
religion a Unitarian. Edward Piper, second son of Noah L. Piper, was 
born in Toronto in.1842. In 1875 he succeeded to his father's business 
which he still carries on. In 1866 he married Elizabeth Morgan, daughter 
of John Morgan, of Scarboro'. 
JOHN PLATT was born in the County of Armagh, Ireland, in 1815, and 
came to Canada with his father, Richard Platt, in 1827. He spent several 
years in hotel keeping, his first venture being on Colborne Street. After 
remaining here about five years;he built a hotel on Jarvis Street, which was 
burnt down on the 7th of April, 1849, at the time of the destruction of old 
St. James's Cathedral, the Market, City Hall and other buildings. He 
rebuilt, and successfully conducted, a hotel until 1864, when he retired. He 
has accumulated a large amount of city property, owning three hotels, fifty 
acres in Leslieville, twelve near High Park, and five at the mouth of the 
Humber. In addition, he holds many stores and dwelling-houses through- 
out the city. In 1841 he married Elizabeth Carter, by whom he had eleven . 
children, six of whom are still living. He now resides qt 33 \Vilton Avenue. 
SAMUEL PLATT, M.P., was born in the north of Ireland, in 1812, being 
the fourth son of Richard Platt. He passed his early days upon his father's 
farm. In 1827 the family emigrated to Canada and settled temporarily 
at Kingston, where the Government was engaged in building a roadway 
from the mainland to the New Fort. Here Richard Platt secured employ- 
ment for himself and son. In 1829 his father removed to Toronto, and 
located on King Street, near the Market, where he rented a house from John 
Baldwin. He soon after died. His wife survived him only a few years, 
when the family was broken up. Our subject was early thrown upon_his 
own resources, and the first winter he spent chopping cord-wood on what 



City of Toronto. 


13 1 


is now known as Sherbourne Street (then covered with a good growth of 
basswood and other timber). He was to receive three York shillings per 
cord; but, after working some time and his employer failing to pay him, he 
abandoned the business and entered the employment of Enoch Turner, whose 
brewery was then upon the present site of the gas works, as a clerk. With 
Mr. Turner he served four years, at the expiration of which time he erected 
a distillery upon the same site; the distillery was conducted by Mr. Platt 
in connection with the brewery for fourteen years, when he retired. In 
1837 l\Ir. Platt married the only daughter of Mr. George Lockett, of 
Staffordshire, England. During the Rebellion of 1837, he was a volunteer 
in. Colonel Ridout's Company, and had charge of two companies of Militia. 
He sat in the City Council for St. Lawrence Ward for eight years, and for 
St. David's Ward for two years. When the City W ater Works were being 
constructed he was chosen commissioner, with Hon. George Allan, to 
superintend the erection. Duri
g the political contest of 1873 Mr. Platt 
was nominated by the Conservative Party to represent East Toronto in 
the Dominion House; he was elected and sat for five years, at the expira- 
tion of which time he was returned by a handsome majority for the House 
of Commons. In 1850 he was commissioned a magistrate for the County 
of York. For the last ten years he has been a director of the \Vestern 
Canada Loan Co., and also of the Gas Company. He is now living a 
quiet, retired life, a portion of his time being spent in travelling with his 
wife through the different countries of Europe. 
JAMES \V. POTTER is a native of Thetford, England. When sixteen years 
of age he entered the University of Cambridge (being the youngest but one 
who gained admittance that year), and graduated with a B.A. degree. On 
leaving college he enlisted in the British Army, and served in the Crimea; 
after which he received an appointment as Inspector of Artillery Stores. 
Subsequently he entered the police force, in which he remained five years, 
and resigning his position in 1868, he came to Canada and was employed 
on the Ottawa Railway as baggage-master. In 1870 he came to Toronto, 
and was appointed inspector and foreman of the Board of Health, which 
office he filled for seven years. Mr. Potter is now a reporter on the llfail 
staff for the eastern part of the city. He was two years on the School 
Board, and was elected during the present year to represent the new.Ward 
of St. 
Iatthew's. 


JAMES PRICE, who has been a resident of Toronto for many years, was 
born at Hampstead, Middlesex, England, on March 13, 1810. He left his 
home, June I, 1832, and came to Canada, arriving at Peterboro', Se
_ 



13 2 


Biographical Notices. 


tember I of the same year; after remainìng a little over a year, he came to 
Toronto, and, while there, engaged with W. H. Patterson, of Streetsville
 
with whom he served as clerk in the store till the spring of 1834, when he 
again went to Peterboro', and worked at his trade as bricklayer and 
builder. In 1837 he was engaged on the Lock Works at Crooks Rapids, 
from whence he came back to Toronto, in July, 1838. He was married on 
January 8, 1839. His eldest son, Mr. James Price, jun'r, is manager of 
the Queen Street Branch of the Dominion Bank. Mr. Price, sen'r, after- 
wards engaged in contracting tor himself. He built the Commercial Bank, 
a wholesale warehouse for the Hon. \Vm. McMaster, and one for Mr. 
l\1cMurrich. 'fr. Price then worked for the Government, and was clerk of 
the works in the erection of many building
, among which may be mentioned 
a portion of Upper Canada College, Normal School and the New Garrison. 
the whole of the New Jail and the Deaf and Dumb Institute at Belleville. 
He represented St. James's Ward in the City Council, and was a member 
of the old fire brigade, NO.3. He was School Trustee for two years for 
St. Patrick's Vvard. He has been for many years employed by the Cor- 
poration as assessor and inspector of works, and, in connection with Mr. 
John Harper, made the valuation of all the city property upon which the 
Council borrowed money from England, Mr. Price has been a resident of 
St. John's Ward for over thirty years, and still continues to reside there. 


JOSEPH PRICE, deceased, was born in Hertfordshire, England, in 179 0 , 
and came to Canada at the close of the war in 181+ \Vhen he first came 
to America he settled in the State of N ew York, and while there engaged 
in the iron and brass trade. He was aU. E. Loyalist, and, on arriving in 
Canada, settled first in the Township of Toronto, where he purchased a 
farm. He afterwards removed to York Township, where he resided ten 
years, then moved to Toronto. A few years later he purchased two hundred 
acres of the Elmsley Estate, lot 18, east of Yonge Street, and erected 
a saw-mill on the creek which still bears his name. He engaged in the 
lumber trade for twenty years until his death in 1846. He left two sons 
and one daughter; the latter is still living. He was a member of the Free- 
mason body, and also belonged to the St. George's Society. He was 
Captain in the First Militia of York, and took an active part in the Rebellion 
of 18 37; he was a strong Conservative and a follower of the English Church. 
Mr. Price married Maria, daughter of Thomas Kimberly, who died in 18 49. 


CAPTAIN JOHN QUINN was born in St. Andaire, Spain, June 2, 181 5, 
his father being a soldier in the British Army, which was then fighting in 



Czty of Toronto. 


133 


the Peninsular vVar. In 1832 his father, with his family, came to Canada 
and took up land in the Township of Emily, Victoria County; he died the 
same year. At the death of his father, which occurred so shortly after his 
arrival in Canada, the subject of this sketch sold the farm and accepted 
the life of a lake mariner. He began on the steamer Great Britain, which 
used to make eight-day trips around the lake, calling at Canadian and 
American ports. After four years he became bartender in a hotel in 
Toronto, and then went back to the Great Britain as steward. In 1835 he 
worked on the Iroquois, the first steamer that went down the Rapids. 
Among other boats that he worked on were the United Kingdom, Burling- 
ton, Britannia, Transit, City of Toronto, Ecliþse, TVest, MaPle Leaf and Peerless. 
In 1853 he built, and ran between the Island and the city, a ferry boat 
called the Citizen. He served during the Rebellion. In 1838 he married 
a daughter of John Hesson. 


\VILLIAM RAWLIN, retired, 54 Elm Street, was born January 24, 1812. 
in Kirbygrindle, Yorkshire, England, being the second eldest in a family of 
four sons and four daughters. His father was \ViUiam Rawlin, and his 
mother a daughter of John Harper. He came to Canada in 1832, and 
worked on a farm near vVoodstock until 1837, when he came to Toronto 
and commenced teaming for Charles Cooper, with whom he lived for nine 
years. For six years he was hostler at the Green Heifer, a hotel kept by 
Henry Fuljames, at the corner of Queen and Yonge Streets. In 1859 he 
went to England, and on his return took the contracts for the street cross- 
ings. In 1852 1Vlr. Rawlin married Mary Ann Clayton, who is of English 
descent. He has no children. He is a Reformer in politics, and in religion 
is a Methodist. He is also a member of the St. George's Society. 


D. B. READ, Q.C., was born on the 13th of June, 1823. in the Town- 
ship of Augusta, a short distance from Brockville; his grandfather Read was 
aU. E. Loyalist, and drew land as such; he came to Canada from Con- 
necticut. D. B. Read's father was John Landon Read, who served in the 
War of 1812. Mr. "Read's maternal grandfather was David Breakenridge, 
also aU. E. Loyalist, and an officer in the British Colonial Army during 
the American Revolution. Mr. Breakenridge resided below Brockville on 
the St. Lawrence, near Maitland, and was for some time Chairman of the 
Quarter Sessions at Broc
ville. The subject of this sketch was in his early 
youth a pupil ot Mr. Elms, a well-known district school teacher of that day, 
noted as well for his leaJ;"ning as for his school teaching. l\Ir. Read went to 
Upper Canada College in 1836 to finish his education; he passed through 



134 


Biographical Notices. 


all the forms in the College, and then entered the law office of the Hon. 
George Sherwood, at Brockville; in 1842 he removed to Belleville, and 
entered the law office of the Hon. John Ross; and in 1845 he removed to 
Toronto, where he completed his studies with John Crawford, afterwards 
Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario. Mr. Read was called to the Bar in 1845 ; 
elected a Bencher of the Law Society in 1855; was created a Queen's 
Counsel in 1858; made Mayor of Toronto in 1858; and Commissioner for 
consolidating the Statutes of Upper Canada. Mr. Read has practised his 
profession in Toronto from his first entry to the Bar down to the present time. 


HON. DAVID REESOR is the descendant of a German family, his great 
grandfather, Christian Reesor, a Mennonite :i\Iinister, emIgrated from 
l\lannheim to Pennsylvania about 1737, having under his charge a small 
colony, and settled in Lancaster County, where some of the family still 
reside, the original homestead, a splendid farm of three hundred acres, 
being in their hands. The first settlement of this family in the Township 
of ::\Iarkham took place as early in its history as 1801, when the grandfather 
of our subject, ChrIstian Reesor,jun'r, his father, Abraham Reesor, together 
with three uncles, located in that section of the country. Here David 
Reesor was born on the 18th January, 1823. His mother was Anna Detti- 
wiler, who was also from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania; she died "in 

Iarkham in 1857, the father having died many years before, in 1832. The 
early education of Senator Reesor was only that obtained from the common 
schools; but, previous to being put to any business, he received three 
years private training under a competent instructor with beneficial results. 
His father's farm was the first stage on which he enacted his part in the 
drama of life, thence from agricultural pursuits he went to those of merchant 
and manufacturer, conducting business in the last named branches for five 
years. In 1856 h
 published the first copy of the Markham Economist, a 
journal of strong Reform proclivities, which he edited and conducted with 
considerable skill for several years, selling out about 1868. He has been a 
Magistrate since 1848; a Notary Public since 1862, and for a longtime was 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Markham Agricultural Society. \\Then York, 
Ontario and Peel were united in 1850, he became a member of the County 
Council, and served several years, being Warden in 1860. His career as a 
school trustee will not soon be forgotten, as it was upon his motion that 
Markham secured a Grammar School. He has long been connected with 
the Militia, and has held the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel of the Reserve 
since 1866. He was appointed Returning-officer for the East Riding of 
York, July, 1854. In the more extensive region of politics, Senator Reesor 



t'I, 



 
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- 


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City of Toronto. 


135 


has not been less true to his principles, or less active as a general advocate 
of measures that tend to the public good, than when in the limited sphere 
of Township Councillor he supported and directed local improvements. 
He represented Kings Division in the Legislative Council of Canada, from 
1860 until the Confederation of the Provinçes, when he was called to the 
Senate by Royal Proclamation, October 23, 1867. At the time when the 
Confederation measure was under discussion in the Legislative Council he 
moved a resolution, which had it been passed would have made the office 
of Senator elective; it was however defeated on a division. He is a Liberal 
in politics. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Church, and every 
good cause obtains from him a hearty and willing support; he was for 
many years President of the Markham Bible Society. In February, 1848, he 
married Emily, eldest daughter of Daniel McDougall, Esq., of St. Mary s, 
Ontario, and sister of the Hon. William McDougall, C.B., M.P,; they have 
five children, four daughters and one son, two of the former being married. 
:l\Iarion Augusta, the eldest daughter, is the wife of Dr. Colburn of Oshawa, 
and Jessie Adelaide is the wife of John Holmes of Toronto. The Senator's 
residence is at Rosedale, North Toropto, where he has lived since 18 7 6 , 
enjoying that retirement which has been well earned by a long official 
career. He is highly esteemed by the many friends he has made, both in 
public and private life, all of whom trust that for years to come he may be 
spared to remain in our midst. 


\IV ILLIA
I REID was born in the County of Tyrone, Ireland, in 18 44, 
being the youngest of nine children born to Samuel and Sarah (Lackie) 
Reid. He came to Canada in 1847 with his parents, who located on the lot 
where Mr. Reid now resides, 147 Elzabeth Street, Toronto. In 1882 he 
entered the Toronto Custom House, where he is employed in the examining 
warehouse. In 1865 he married Margaret, second daughter of James 
Spence, an old resident of Toronto, by whom he has seven children, four 
sons and three daughters. . 


WILLIAM REYNOLDS, Yorkville. In the biography of Mr. John Smith, 
of Toronto, which has a place in these pages, allusion is made to William 
Peak, the first white settler of York County, Ontario. The subject of this 
sketch is the grandson of \Villiam Peak on the maternal side, and can there- 
fore claim hereditary descent from the original founders of York. His 
grandfather, on his father's side, was \IV. H. Reynolds, who was from the 
North of Ireland. He emigrated to Canada in 1795 and settled in the 9 th 
concession of Markham Township, York County, where he lived until his 



13 6 


Bz'ographical Nott"ces. 


death at the age of ninety-seven years. He left a family of four children 
besides the father of our subject. The latter married a daughter of \Villiam 
Peak. Mr. Peak received from Governor Simcoe, for services rendered, 
two hundred acres of land at Duffin's Creek. \Villiam Reynolds was 
born in Toronto, March 9, 1818, and, when he was seven years of age, 
his parents went to reside at Niagara, and after staying there three years 
removed to St. Catharines. They subsequently returned to Little York, 
where \Villiam has since remained. Mr. Reynolds may be classed amongst 
the oldest residents of the city, and few events in connection with its 
history have escaped his recollection. 


DR. RICHARDSON, Professor of Anatomy at the Toronto School of 
:Medicine. His grandfather served in the British Navy under Lord Rodney, 
and came to Canada in 1785, when he received an appointment in the 
Canadian Marine. Dr. Richardson's father was James Richardson, who 
was born January 29, 1791. He married Rebecca, second daughter of John 
Dennis, a U .E. Loyalist who came to Canada from Philadelphia, where 
the family owned considerable proper:ty. The subject of this sketch began 
his studies in 1841, in Rochester, N.Y., with Dr. Rolph, remaining there two 
years. In 1844 he went to England, where he studied for three years in 
Guy's Hospital, London, and about a year in Bristol. He then returned 
to Canada and took his diploma. He afterwards was appointed Professor 
of Practical Anatomy at Kingston College, which position he maintained 
until the abolItion of the Medical Faculty in 1853. He then practised his 
profession until his acceptance of his present position in the Toronto' 
School of Medicine. 


JOHN KNIGHT RIDDALL, M.D., now practising at Parkdale, in the City 
of Toronto, is the eldest son of the late John Riddall, M.D., L.R.C.S., 
Edinburgh; M.D. University College, L.S....\..I., and nephew of Dr. Alex- 
ander Knight, Medical Inspector-General, P.L.B., Ireland. The subject of 
this memoir was born at Clones, Cùunty I\Ionaghan, Ireland, on the 31st 
October, 1837, and after pasing his matriculation examination, was appren- 
ticed to the celebrated Dr. \Vyse of Dublin, and at a very early age entered 
upon the arduous studies of his profession under the able tuition of Professor 
Graves, Sir \V. \V. \Vylde, Sir Philip Crampton, Sir H. Marsh, William 
Stokes, Sir D. Corrigan; all eminent physicians and surgeons of the ùay 
The Crimean \Var breaking out, Dr. Riddall having placed his name for 
service abroad, was drafted twice, the last time accepting. He was attached 
to the Army Hospital Corps, on active service in the East, and did duty 



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City of Toronto. 


137 


both at Scutari and Balaclava in 1855, and was present at the evacuation of 
Sebastapol, seeing much active service, at the age of eighteen. On his 
return from the East he completed. his studies, becoming a Licentiate of 
the Apothecaries' Hall, Dublin, in 1854, and Licentiate in Surgery and 
Midwifery, Dublin, in 1857. Owing to exposurð and hard work, he was, for 
many months, laid up with inflammatory rheumatism, which, by the advice 
of his medical confrères, necessitated his removal to Canada, where he 
obtained the degree of M.D., Victoria College, in 1864, and was appointed 
Coroner for the Counties of Peel and Simcoe. He married Margaret, 
second daughter of the late Joseph Griffith, Esq., \Veston, Ontario. In 1863, 
the period of the Trent affair, he raised the Caledon InfantrÿCompany, of 
which he was Captain, doing duty throughout the Campaign of 1866. He 
was appointed to the Surgeoncy of the 36th Regiment of Peel Infantry in 
1867, which post he still retains, and did duty with his regiment at Toronto 
in camp, during Toronto's Semi-Centennia] Celebration. 


THE RIDOUT FAMILY. The first mention made of this family is from 
"Hutchin's Visitation of ,Somerset," England, in the College of Arms, 
London, where a Coat of Arms was granted in 1531 to Thomas Ridout, of 
the Parish of Hensbridge, in Somerset. The Ridouts have been princi- 
pally located in Blandford and Sherborne, Dorset, England, after which 
Sherbourne Street (should be Sherborne), Toronto, was named by the 
Honourable Thomas Ridout, the Surveyor-General, in commemoration of his 
birthplace. The first mention by Hutchin of the family residing in Bristol, 
is the marriage, in 1674, of Susannah, daughter and heiress of John Ridout, 
of Bristol, to Thomas Strangways of Melbury, County of Dorset, whose 
grand-daughter (Elizabeth), married Stephen Fox who was created Earl of 
Ilchester in 1741. George Ridout, ...he father of our subjects, and his wife 
Mary Ann (Wright) Ridout settled in York in 1826, having come out from 
England in 1820, to the United States. _\fter residing in Philadelphia a 
short time, upon the recommendation of his uncle, the Honourable Thomas 
Ridout (Surveyor-General of Upper Canada), he removed his family to 
Toronto, with the exception of the eldest sons (George Perceval and 
Joseph D.) who remamed at New York and Philadelphia. He subsequently 
received a Government appointment which he held until the time of his 
death, September 3, 1835; his wife dying October 3 of the same year. 
George Ridout was born at Bristol, England, on the 22nd of February, 
1783; his father Nicodemus Ridout, being an elder brother of the Honour- 
able Thomas Ridout (the Surveyor-General of Upper Canada.) The two 
elder sons, George Perceval an'd Joseph D., of the above mentioned George 



,. 


13 8 


Biographical Notzas. 


Ridout, have been for the last fifty years intimately connected with the 
history of Toronto. George Perceval Ridout was born at Bristol, England, 
August 21, 1807. He came to Americ
 with his father in 1820 and resided 
in Philadelphia and New York, where he formed a partnership with his 
brother and the Messrs. Tacratt, of \Volverhampton, England, in the hard- 
ware business in 1832 which he continued in until 1866, when he severed 
his connection with the firm, his brother continuing to carryon the business. 
During the Rebellion of 1837, l\Ir. George Perceval Ridout took an active 
part and was Captain of the 7th Battalion of the Regiment of York Volun- 
teers, from which he retired some years later with the rank of Colonel. 
He represented Toronto in the Dominion Parliament in 1851-2-3, and was 
also requested to stand for Toronto in the election of 1844, but fearing a 
defeat to the Conservative cause, on account of more than two of the party 
being in the field, he retired, notwithstanding he was first nominated, for 
which action he received the personal thanks of Sir P. Metcalfe, Governor- 
General of Canada, as will be seen by the following: 
GOVERNMENT HOUSE, 
QUEBEC, October 22, 1844. 
DEAR SIR,- The public spirited and honourable course you pursued 
during the late election for the City of Toronto has attracted the Governor- 
General's attention, and has won his warm admiration. His Excellency 
considers that you have conferred a signal service upon Her Majesty's 
Government and the constitutional cause by voluntarily withdrawing from 
the contest, rather than create division among the ranks of its supporters, 
and his Excellency feels that he is in no small degree indebted to your 
genuine patriotism for the great triumph gained by the issue of the election. 
I am desired to say that the Governor-General would have hailed your 
return to Parliament with high satisfaction, and that his Excellency hopes 
that the country is only temporarily deprived of your services in the Legis- 
lature, which, he believes, would be a
 valuable as your devotion to the 
public weal has proved sincere. 
I have the honour to be, dear sir, 
Your faithful servant, 
J. M. HIGGINSON, Secretary. 
George Perceval Ridout was one of the original founders and President, for 
the years 1850-1 of the Toronto Board of Trade, and President of St. 
George's Society, 1845-6-7; was Governor of the British American Assur- 
ance Company from the 2nd August, 1853. until the time of his death which 
occurred on June 28, 1873. He was never married. Joseph D. Ridout 
the second son, was born at Bristol, England, 9th of June, 1809, and came 
to America with his parents in 1820. His first start in business was in the 

ew York branch of the Messrs. Tarratt, of Wolverhampton, England, 



City of Toronto. 


139 


from which place he was shortly afterwards sent to Boston, to open a 
branch for the same firm. At this time he was only nineteen years of age, 
and the confidence placed in him by his employers, who at that time were 
one of the leading iron firms of England, was only the forerunner of the 
trust and confidence placed in him during the rest of his business career. 
He came to Little York in 1831, and one year later entered into partner- 
ship with his brother and the Messrs. Tarratt. After his brother's retire- 
ment he took into the partnership James Aikenhead and Alexander Crombie. 
Both of these gentlemen had been connected with the firm for many years. 
Joseph D. Ridout retired from the firm in 1876, leaving the business in the 
hands of the present firm, Messrs. Aikenhead & Crombie, in whom he has 
always had the greatest confidence. Joseph D. Ridout was one of the 
founders of the Toronto Board of Trade, which was established in 1834 in 
Toronto. He was one of the founders of the St. George's Society and w4as 
four times honoured with the Presidency (1851-2-3-4). He was the Vice- 
President of the Farmers' and :Mechanics' Building Society, which success- 
fully closed its business in 1853. and from which originated the present 
Canada Permanent Loan and Savings Company, of which he was President 
from its organization, until January, 1884, when he resigned on account 
of failing health. His skilful management and constant, laborious 
.supervision helped materially in bringing that great financial institution 
to the high point of credit and prosperity which it now enjoys, it being one 
of the foremost institutions of the kind in America. He was also for some 
time Grand Master of the Independent Order of Oddfellows, and was one 
of the original founders, and President for some time, of the Mechanics' 
Institute. He was an officer in the East York Militia from 1833 until it 
was disbanded under new legislation in 1867, w hen he retired with the 
rank of Major. He was in active service during the Rebellion of 1837 and 
1838. He was twice married, first to Julia Elizabeth Gold (widow), sister 
of Mrs. F. W. Cumberland and the late Mrs. T. G. Ridout; and secondly 
to Caroline Cumberland, sister of the late Colonel F. W. Cumberland, by 
whom he had two sons, Perceval F. and \Valter, both residents of Toronto' 
Mr. Joseph D. Ridout died on the 4th of June, 1884. 


RIGGS & IVORY, dentists, South-east corner of King and Yonge Streets, 
established themselves on Queen Street West in 1882, from which place 
they moved to their present rooms in the early part of 1885, and are now 
doing an extensive practice in plate-work, gold-filling, and extensive use of 
anæsthetics, including vitalized air specialities. The establishment is large, 
light, commodious, handsomely furnished, and situated on the most pro- 
minent corner in the city. 



140 


Biographical Notices. 


ISAAC ROBINSON, retired, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1809. His 
father was John Robinson, who had three daughters and two sons; Isaac 
being the eldest of the family. He learned the tailoring trade in England, 
and came to Canada in 1831. He worked in Little York for William 
Lawson, a tailor, until 18 33, when he commenced business for himself on 
Y onge Street. In about two years he removed to King Street near Y onge, 
where he remained two years. His next location was further east on King 
Street; he was there for eleven years. Then he bought a farm four miles 
out of town on Y onge Street, and resided there for fifteen years, when he 
returned to the city to live. At the time of the Rebellion he was taken 
prisoner by Dr. Rolph. He is a Methodist and a Conservative. In September, 
1882, he married Ruth \Valker, who is still living. By his marriage he had 
the following children, viz.: Mary Ann, died in infancy; Margaret, married 
E. Snider, and living in Manitoba; Mary Jane, married Rev. W. Hunter; 
Sarah Ann, married Irving \"'1 alker; Eliza, married B. Fitch; Edgerton 
W., living in London; Clara, married Rev. W. J. Joliffe; Hannah, dead; 
and Amelia. 


ROBERT HUNTER ROBINSON, M.D., was born in \Vest Gwillimbury, 
Simcoe County, being the youngest son of Gilbert Robinson, Esq., J.P., 
who was born in 1807, and emigrated from King's County, Ireland, in r829.' 
His mother came from County 
\ntrim, Ireland, in 1834. Dr. Robinson is 
one of a family of seven children. He received his preliminary education in 
Bradford High School, afterwards attending the Toronto School of 
Medicine, and graduated at Toronto University in 1873, and in 1874 as 
:\1.C.P.S.O. In 1872 Dr. Robinson was assistant-physician at the Toronto 
General Hospital, and to the Small-pox Hospital in 1873. He married on 
May 20, 18 74, Nellie Van Allen, a native of Detroit. There is no issue. 
Dr. Robinson is a Conservative in politics, and in religion a member of the 
Methodist Church. Gilbert Robinson, J.P., the father of Dr. Robinson, 
may be classed as among the first settlers of the Township or West Gwil. 
limbury. He came to this country in 1829, and arrived at Little York, now 
Toronto, from which place he walked next day to vVest Gwillimbury, where 
his father, vVilliam Robinson, then lived, whose house was at that time the 
only one on the Penetanguishene Road. vVilliam Robinson married a 
daughter of the Rev. John Connell, an Episcopal Minister of King's County, 
Ireland; he was a brother to the late Captain Gilbert Robinson of the 4 th 
Battallion, Royal Artillery, Woolwich, England. Gilbert Robinson and his 
wife are still living, and have recently celebrated their golden wedding, 
surrounded by their family and friends. 



City of Toronto. 


141 


THOMAS ROBINSON, deceased, was born in Yorkshire, England, 1815, 
and came to Toronto in 1830. He married Ann, the eldest daughter of 
William Jackson, who had settled in Toronto in r
3I. His wife attended 
the Central School which was taught at one time by Bishop Strachan. 
During the Cholera of 1832 Mr. Robinson attended the death-beds of 
several neighbours. Mr. Robinson continued the tailoring business after 
his father-in-law removed to Eglinton. In 1850 he was burnt out by the 
great fire, after which he opened a temporary shop on Y onge Street, 
opposite Edward Street, until he rebuilt on the old site 127 Y onge Street, 
and carried on business there until 1871, when he retired and built 616 
Yonge Street, to which place he removed. He died in 1877. 


SAMUEL ROGERS, deceased, was born in Coleraine, Ireland, in 1809, 
being the sixth of a family of eight children. His parents were William and 
Mary (Rodden) Rogers. In 1830 he came to Canada with John Duncan, 
with whom he had learned his trade. In r831 he opened a shop on the 
north-east éorner of King and Bay Streets, and in r838 he removed to his 
late premises, which he bought. Mr. Rogers was a member of the old fire 
brigade, and represented St. Andrew's Ward in the City Council for one 
year. He was a Reformer in politics, and in religion a member of the 
Methodist Church. In 1833 he married Elizabeth Knott. He died 7th 
October, 1884. 


WILLIAM ROMAIN was born in Quebec, July 15, 1818, and is one of a 
family of eight children born of Pére and Elizabeth (McDonald) Romain. 
His father was born in Qüëbec in 1777, and his mother was the eldest 
daughter of Major McDonald, who was on active service in 1812. Pére 
Romain also served in that war as lieutenant. vVilliam Francis Romain 
came to Little York in May, 1830, and entered the service of Sir W. P. 
Howland & Brother, of Toronto Township, as clerk. Two years later he 
became manager for the pioneer store and grain dealer in the present town 
of Brampton, and was the first post-master of that place. He married 
Ann, eldest daughter of the late Colonel Wm. Chisholm, and settled in 
Oakville, Halton County, where he at present resides. Mr. Romain was 
Reeve of the Township of Trafalgar for two years; and when Oakville was 
incorporated as a town he served for many years as Councillor, and was 
twice elected unanimously as Mayor. The Romain Buildings on King 
Street West were built by himself and brother. 


DR. JAMES Ross was born in York Township in 1832. His father, 
James Ross, sen'r, was born at sea in the Cove of Cork, off the coast of 



14 2 


Biographtcal Notices. 


Ireland, January 26,1786, and in 1796 came to Canada with his parents, and 
brothers and sister, John, Mary, Robert, George and Thomas. James Ross, 
sen'r, began business as a tailor, which he continued until the \\Tar of 1812. 
He was taken prisoner at the capitulation of York. He afterwards settled 
on a farm in York Township, where he remained until 1858, and then moved 
into the city. He died at Newmarket in 1868. Until he was seventeen, 
the subject of this sketch spent his life on his father's farm. In 1847, he 
ploughed at Hamilton, Ont., in the Junior Class (under sixteen years) and 
won the first prize (a purse and a diploma); the latter now adorns the wall 
of his study. In 1848 he entered the Toronto School of Medicine under 
Dr. Rolph. In 1851 he obtained his license from the Provincial Board, and 
subsequently graduated at Jefferson College, Philadelphia, in 1852. The 
same year he returned to Toronto, where he has since carried on the 
practice of his profession. In 1854 he married Ann Jane, second daughter 
of John McIntosh, of Toronto. Dr. Ross does not take an active part in 
politics; in religion he is a Presbyterian. He is now President of the 
Ontario branch of the Caledonian Curling Club. 
GEORGE G. ROWE, M.D. The subject of this sketch was born in 1854, 
at Churchville, Peel County, in which place he commenced his education, 
attending Public Schools until his removal to Georgetown Academy, and 
subsequently to the Canadian Literary Institute at \Voodstock, where he 
finished his elementary studies. He matriculated in Toronto University 
in 1875, graduating four years after. and has been in the active practice of 
his profession since. He took up his residence in Parkdale in 1881, and 
since his advent there has gathered together a large and profitable practice. 
Dr. Rowe holds numerous offices, being medical attendant for the Granù 
Trunk Railway Company, as well as for several benevolent societies. He 
is the Medical Health Officer for the municipality of Parkdale, and is on 
the staff of physicians attached to the Home for Incurables. Dr". Rowe . 
married, in 1880, Jeanie E., eldest daughter of Thos. Clark, of Georgetown. 
REV. ALEXANDER SANSON, Rector of Trinity Church, Toronto, was born 
in Edinburgh, Scotland, January 6, 1819. His father, James Sanson, was 
born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1791, and died in Orillia, Ontario, April 
13; 1874. His mother Mary Laing, daughter of \Villiam Laing, of Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, was born in 1790, and died in Orillia on the same day 
that her husband died. Our subject was educated in his native city, and 
was ordained a clergyman of the Church of England May 8, 1842. He 
was Rector of York Mills until 1852, since when he has been connected 
with Trinity Church, Toronto. 



City of Toronto. 


143 


ROBERT SARGEANT was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1813, and 
emigrated to Canada in 1834, taking up his residence in Toronto the same 
year. He engaged in contracting and building, and in 1837 erected the 
first brick house in the" City Block" for Mr. Atkinson. He continued in 
this business until 1850, when he opened a general store under the name of 
Robert Sargeant & Co., NO.2 St. Lawrence Block, which he conducted 
until 1862, afterwards commencing gardening, east of the Don. After 
spending seven years in this business he retired, subsequently receiving 
the appointment of City Inspector, an office which he held for'seven 
years; retiring from the same into private life. In 1837 he married Miss 
Eunice Hutchinson, who died in 1858, leaving four children. 


RICHARD SCORE, tailor, and importer of fine woollens, Toronto, was 
born in Devonshire, England, in 1807. His parents were John and Johanna 
Score. He spent his early life in England, where he learned the tailoring 
business with his father. In 1832 he married Harriett, youngest daughter 
of John Courtice, and in the following year came to Canada with his wife 
and one child. He settled in Toronto, and commenced business in 18 45, 
on King Street West, in what was called Chewett's Buildings, a few doors 
west of his present place of business. Mr. Score has four surviving 
children (three daughters and one son). His son is a member of the present 
firm of R. Score & Son. In politics Mr. Score is a Conservative, and in 
religion a Methodist. 


FRANCIS H. SEFTON, dentist, was born in the City of \Vorcester, Eng- 
land, and is one of a family of nIne children born of H. F. and Martha 
(Brown) Sefton. Francis was educated at the Ontario Dental College, and 
began practice on receiving his diploma. He married in 1833 Amy Firlde 
of Prescott, Ontario, of English extraction. 


JOHN SHAW, builder, 102-1 Euclid Avenue, a York Pioneer, was born 
at Newmarket, Ontario, in 1822, being the son of William Shaw, a native 
of Queen's County, Ireland, who settled in Little York in 1800. His mother 
was a daughter of William Hunter, a ulacksmith and farrier, who emigrated 
from England with his family to the United States, and settled for a short 
time in Albany, N.Y. He came to Little York about 1797 with his six 
daughters, where he was employed by Governor Simcoe for some time as 
blacksmith and veterinary surgeon for mounted troops. He then moved a 
little north of Thornhill on Y onge Street, where he established himself in 
business. He was the first blacksmith established in this county. During 
the War of 1812, Mr. Shaw's father belonged to the York Militia, and 



144 


Biographical Notices. 


participated in the battle of York and some others. After the surrender of 
the town to the Americans the troops were billetted on the inhabitants. 
During their stay in the town, a portion of the flour, provisions, stores, etc., 
which had been sent out from England for the supply of the garrison and 
other purposes, was distributed by the American officers among the citizens. 
The Government issued a proclamation after the Americans left the town 
calling for the people to return the provisions, which was done in nearly 
every case. Among the other members of this family who emigrated to this 
continent may be mentioned George Shaw, who died at Niagara; John 
Shaw, sen'r, who settled in New York; and Joseph Shaw, who had a brewery 
at Little York, and subsequently died at Hogg's Hollow; these were uncles 
of the subject of this sketch. The father of our subject, \Villiam Shaw, 
soon after his arrival in York, was appointed clerk in the Parliament 
Buildings, during the regime of Governor Simcoe, also under the adminis- 
tration of Governor Hunter, and subsequently died in New York while 
visiting some friends there. John passed the first ten years of his life in 
York, and then removed with his parents to Thornhill, where he resided 
until 1845, and there learned the trade of cabinet-maker, which business he 
continued until 1845, when he removed to \Vhitby, Ont., where he resided 
until 1873. He then removed to Toronto, and has since been engaged in 
business there as a builder. He was married in \Vhitby to Margaret, 
daughter of \Villiam Flint, by whom he has two sons and two daughters, 
viz.: \Villiam, Arthur, Margaretta and Louisa. He had four brothers and 
one sister, his eldest brother WIlliam, at Aurora, being the only one now 
Ii ving. 
JOHN SHAW was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1809. He came to 
Toronto in 1857, and remained until 1870, when he removed to St. Louis, 
Missouri. After an absence of six years he returned to Toronto, where he 
has since continued to reside. In 1839 he married Jane, daughter of John 
Place, Esq., of Ballyfermot House, County of Dublin, Ireland. the result of 
the union being six children, four of whom are still living. 


CHARLES SHEPPARD, No. 2371 Yonge Street, was born in England, 1819, 
and came to Toronto, Canada, in 1821 with his father, Thomas Sheppard, 
who built and kept the" -Golden Lion" Hotel, seven miles north of Toronto. 
In 1855 he married Eliza Cousins, by whom he had four children. Mr. 
Sheppard had been living in Toronto since 1864. He is one of the best 
shots in Canada, having won $8,000 in prizes with the rifle. He was noted 
as a great deer hunter, having with a comrade, Mr. John Perry, of King 
Township, killed fourteen in one day. About 1881 he lost the sight of his 



City of Toronto. 


145 


right eye from a cataract, and one year after he was afflicted in the same 
way in the left eye, but fortunately had an operation performed by Dr. 
Rosebrugh which saved the sight of both eyes. 


JOHN SMALL, deceased, the first of the name in Canada, is a member 
of an old Gloucestershire family. He \vas born in Gloucestershire, England, 
in 1746, and came to Canada with Governor Simcoe, and settled in the 
then Town of York (now Toronto) in 1793. He left in England his younger 
brother, J os
ph Atwell Small, D. D., Prebend of the Cathedrals of Gloucester 
and Bristol, and one of the Chaplains of the King. His house (Berkeley 
House) in York was built near the present corner of King and Berkeley 
streets, and is now occupied by his grandson, John Small, M.P. l\Ir. Small 
was appointed by the Imperial Government as Clerk of the Crown and 
Clerk of the first Executive Council in Upper Canada. This position he 
held until the time of his death, on the loth of July, 1831, at the age of 
eighty-five years. James Edward, the eldest son living at the time of the 
death of John Small aboye named, was born in 1798, and is said to have 
been the third white child born in York. H
 served as a midshipman on 
the ship St. Lawrence, seventy-four guns, during the \Var of 1812. Mr. 
Small was elected as a member of Parliament twice for the City of Toronto, 
and in the year 1842 for the Third Riding of York. In 1843 he took the 
portfolio of Solicitor-General in the Baldwin-Lafontaine Cabinet. He was 
one of the representatives of Canada who proceeded to England for the 
purpose of negotIating with the Home Government for a representative 
Government. Subsequently he was appointed Judge of the County of 
Middlesex, which position he held until his death, which occurred in 
London, Ontario, on the 23rd of May, 1869, at the age of seventy-one. 
John T. Small, M.D., the eldest son of James Edward, was born at York in 
1823. He was one of the pupils of the late Bishop Bethune at the rectory 
at Cobourg. He afterwards went to the Upper Canada College, and thence 
to the Universîty of King's College, which was then situated where the 
pre
ent Parliament Buildings are. Having decided upon adopting the 
medical profession, he went to the Old Country in 1845. After studying for 
several years in Guy's Hospital, and in the hospitals of Paris, Edinburgh 
and Dublin, he took the degree of M.D. at the University of St. Andrew's, 
and became a member of the Royal College of Surgeons for England in 
1851. In the following year he returned to Toronto and commenced the 
practice óf medicine. Dr. Small was married in Scotland in 1852, to 
Catherine Frances, the daughter of Alexander Herriot, of the Law House, 
in Berwickshire, Dr. Small is a Mason, having been initiated in the 
II 



14 6 


Biographical .I.Votices. 


Order of A.F.'and A.M. in 1845; and is a member of St. George's Society. 
He is a Presbyterian, being a member of St. Andrew's, the church of the 
Rev. D. J. Macdonnell. 


ANDREW SMITH, founder and present Principal of the Ontario Veterinary 
College, is a native of Ayrshire, Scotland, and received his professional 
education in the Edinburgh Veterinary College, and graduated in 1861 with 
the highest honors. The staff of Professors and the subjects taught are as 
follow:-Ptof. Smith, V.S., Edinburgh, 
'1.R.C.V.S., and Honorary Asso- 
ciate, R.C. V.S. (Principal), Diseases of Domesticated Animals; J. Thorburn, 
M.D., Edinburgh, Veterinary Alateria Aledica; M. Barrett, l\I.D., Animal 
Physiology; Prof. Smith, V.S., and assistants, Clinical Instructors; Dr. 
Ellis, University, Chemistry,. George Buckland, The Histor)', Breeding and 
lrlanagement of Domestic Animals; J. T. Duncan, M.D., V.S., Demonstrator 
of Anatomy / J. T. Duncan, M.D., V.S., Histology. 


HON. FRANK SMITH was born in County Armagh, Ireland, in 1822, and 
settled near Toronto in 1832. In 1849 he went to London, Ont., and 
engageçl in business until 1866, when he made Toronto his home. The 
business which he has established in Toronto is that of an importer and 
wholesale dealer in groceries, wines and liquors. He for the space of nine 
years imported teas direct from China to New York, doing a very large 
business in this line. In 1881 he purchased a controlling interest in the 
Toronto Street Railway. Since then he has trebled its work, until now it 
employs over six hundred horses and traverses the principal streets of the 
city. \Vhile living in London he was an alderman for some years and 
subsequently mayor. In 1871 he was called to the Senate, and in 1882 to 
a seat in the Dominion Cabinet. He is also President of the Home Savings 
and Loan Company, President of the London and Ontario Company, 
President of the Street Railway Company, President of the Northern 
Railway Company, Vice-President of the Dominion Bank"Director in the 
Gas Company, and DIrector in the Dominion Telegraph Company. 
FRANK SMITH, late Bursar of the Toronto General Hospital: was born 
on the 22nd day of April, 1809. He is the second son of Francis and 
Elizabeth Smith, of the County of Kent, England, both born in January, 
1777. In the year 1832 their sons, Frank and Joseph, emigrated to Canada, 
é;l.nd settled on land in the Township of March, Ottawa River, where they 
remained two years, removing to Guelph Township in 1834, where they 
took up seven hundred acres of wild land. In 1835 Frank married the fifth 
daughter of George Davis, Esq., of Guelph., by whom he had thirteen children. 




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City of Toronto. 


147 


In 1851 he removed to St. Catharines, and was engaged in farming there until 
1875, when he removed to Toronto, accepting the appointment of Bursar 
to the Toronto General Hospital, which he held for ten years. During the 
Rebellion in 1837-8 he served under Sir Allan McNab as Lieutenant in the 
6th Gore District Militia. In politics he is Conservative, and in religion a 
staunch member of the Church of England. 


FRED. SMITH, dentist, Queen and Berkeley Streets, was born in Liver- 
pool, England, in 1852. In 1875 he passed the final exami.nation at the 
London College of Dentistry, after which he practised his profession . in 
Wales. In 1879 he came to Toronto; and established himself on Queen 
Street East. He now occupies a fine suite of rooms at the above address. 


JAMES SMITH was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1820, and emigrated 
to Canada when eighteen years of age. On his arrival in Toronto he joined 
the Volunteers, and served about six months, during the close of the" Mac- 
kenzie Rebellion." He then entered the employment of Mr. T. D. Harris, 
a King Street merchant, with whom he remained two years. He afterwards 
followed steamboating for fourteen years, and then took charge of the 
Restaurant at the Union Station, which he conducted for twenty-one years, 
having previously had some experience in hotel-keeping. Mr. Smith retired 
from business in 1879, his present residence being 389 Queen Street West. 
He was one of the originators of the" Queen's Own Rifles," in which 
corps he held the rank of captain. In 1840 he married Rebecca Armstrong, 
who "died in 1858, leaving two children, three having died before their 
mother. Mr. Smith married a second time, his wife being Christina Byers, 
by whom he had nine children, five of whom are living. In politics he is a 
Conservative. He belongs to the Orangemen and Masons. . 


J OHN S
ITH. Instructive and interesting as a perusal of the lives and 
antecedents of the various characters connected with Toronto's rise and 
growth may prove, it is without undue precipitation that we pronounce the 
opinion that the family of the gentleman whose name heads thi
 sketch 
have the claim of possessing a peculiar interest in matters relating to the 
early history of the city. Proud they have a right to be, who, tracing 
their descent to the early pioneer, feel that they are in possession of a 
heritage which will not depreciate in value in the hands of successive 
generations. Individually or collectively, however, they must all give 
way, in point of interest, to the family to whose record this space is 
devoted. At the commencement of the reign of George III. was born in 



14 8 


Biograpllical Notices. 


Nottinghamshire, England, one \Villiam Smith, who in early life acquired 
a knowledge of architecture and engineering, and who was employed on 
account of his skill in these branches by the monarch upon one of his royal 
palaces. In the year 1774 he was sent by the British Government to 
superintend the construction of works at Cape Breton. Upon his arrival 
he drew a large tract of land, which proved a valuable coal mine. This he 
developed, and in 1792 freighted a vessel with coal and sailed for New York 
where he disposed of his cargo and made his way to Newark (now Niagara). 
The following year (1793) he joined General Simcoe, and came with him to 
explore that section of the country of which Toronto is now the capital. 
He found three Indian wigwams east of the Don on the river banks 
(lot 15), one of which contained the Chief Kashago; the only white settlers 
then being William Peak and his family. The latter had been settled there 
some time, and knew the locality well, and often accompanied General 
Simcoe on hunting and fishing expeditions, that being Peak's principal 
occupation. The Governor gave Mr. Smith choice of land, and he selected 
one-fifth of an acre-a town lot-being what is now the corner of King and 
Sherbourne Streets. In the fall of 1793 he returned to Niagara to be with 
his family during the winter, and in the spring of 1794 brought them to 
Little York, and having erected a log hut upon lot 15, settled there. He 
assisted Governor Simcoe in drawing plans for the building of "Castle 
Frank," the old summer house on the heights west of the Don, and in 
various ways brought his knowledge to bear in planning, surveying and 
laying out the future city. He followed his business of builder and con- 
tractor for many years, during which time he constructed many public and 
private buildings. He erected the first English church; also the residence 
of Secretary Jarvis on the corner of Sherbourne and Duke Streets; and 
subsequently, in company with his son-in-law, John Thompson, laid the 
foundation of and erected the lighthouse on the Island. He was a volunteer 
in the War of 1813, and was taken prisoner at the capitulation of York in 
April, 1813. He died in the year 1819, at his residence on the corner of 
King and Sherbourne Streets, and was buried in the old churc:byard of the 
English church, now St. J ames' cathedral. His life was a long and useful 
one, as well as eventful, and he lived long enough to see the muddy little 
York, at whose birth it may be said he presided, growÜig into life and 
vitality, with a prospect of future greatness which it has more than realized. 
Mr. Smith had a family of six children, viz: Thomas, \\Tilliam, Mary, 
Betsy, Sally and Samuel. Thomas was killed at the Battle of Queenston 
Heights. \Villiam, who was born in England in 1781, succeeded his father 
in the business. In 1814 he purchased the adjoining lot (14) two hundred 



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Czty of Toronto. 


149 


and seventy acres, from George Cook for $5,000. In the year 1819 he 
purchased the Governor Simcoe property, lot 15, east of the Don, from 
John Scadding. He erected a tannery at the Don in 1820, and shortly 
afterwards opened a store adjoining the old family residence on King and 
Sherbourne Streets, which he conducted until 1832. In taking to his father's 
business he branched out into the mercantile line, and accumulated a quantity 
of real estate. He purchased the Helliwell property, where the brewery now 
stands. He was the first Assessor and Collector of York and Markham town- 
ships. He was likewise a volunteer in the \Var of 1812, and was taken 
prisoner at the battle of York. He died in 1839, leaving six children. His 
life-long cherished sport was hunting, and, as game of all kinds was then 
abund.ant, sport in plenty was to be had. John, whose name appears at the 
head of this sketch, is the oldest son of the late \Villiam Smith, and was 
born in 1811, at the old home at the corner of King and Sherbourne Streets. 
He is the only male survivor of the family, and now resides on the old Simcoe 
property. Only a few years since he presented to the York Pioneers that 
time-honoured old log cabin which was removed to the Exhibition Grounds 
with appropriate ceremony, and which continues to be an object of historic 
interest to visitors, as well as to the inhabitants of the city. John, when a 
boy, received his first schooling in Michael Doyle's house on Duke Street, 
Mr. Blair being the teacher; then at the old yellow school-house at the corner 
of Ontario and King Streets, at which Mr. Cassells was teacher; and later 
at the Masonic Hall, which opened in 1824 under the tutorship of Thomas 
Appleton, after which he attended James Padfield's school-Secretary 
Jarvis's old house-corner of Sherbourne and Duke Streets. Mr. Smith's 
mother (Julia Ann Lewis) died when he was sixteen years of age. He suc- 
ceeded his father in business, and in 1846 married Mary Magarham, by 
whom he had nine children. He was present at the skirmish near the Don 
Bridge during the Mackenzie Rebellion. Mr. Smith is in politics a Con- 
servative, although he has ever resisted the pressure brought to bear upon 
him by friends whose desire was that he should accept office, municipal 
and political. In concluding this family record, it should be stated that 
Mr. Smith has in his possession an 'old clock made by the late Jordan Post, 
one of the first clockmakers in York, which ticks just as merrily as it did 
three-score and ten years ago when the old man constructed it, and which 
can scarce be excelled as a time-piece at the present day. Mr. Smith is still 
hale and hearty, and, possessing, as he does, a retentive memory, adds to 
the pleasure, as well as the profit, of the present generation by recounting 
the strange events and appearances which in the old days surrounded 
" Little York." 



15 0 


Biographical Notices. 


JOHN T. SMITH, deceased, was born in London, England, 1805. In 
1826 he emigrated to Canada, and soon after his arrival in Toronto served 
the public in the capacity oJ mine host at the Masonic Arms Hotel, \Vest 
:Market Square, where his genial manner won for him hosts of friends, who 
later elected him to a seat in the Council Board for St. Lawrence Ward, 
which he held for several years. He was one of the first to assist in 
organizing the present Gas Company, in which he was a stockholder, and 
a Director until his death, September 10, 1877, aged seventy-two years. 
During the Rebellion of 1837 he served as a volunteer. He was twice 
married, first to a Miss Moore, of Quebec, and on her demise, he married 
in 1857 a daughter of Frederick East, an old English naval officer. Mr. 
Smith was for many years a member of the Ancient, Free and Accepted 
Masons, he was also a member of the English Church. 


\VILLIAM SMITH, waggon-maker, was born in Oxfordshire, England, 
in 1821, being the eldest of a family of two sons and two daughters. In 
1832, his parents, John and Mary (Mason) Smith, came to Canada with 
their children. On the voyage out, on the ship Alexander, the smallpox 
and cholera broke out among the passengers, and Mr. Smith lost.a sister 
two years old by the former, and while waiting at Prescott for a boat to 
take them to York, the mother died of cholera, in a shop there, leaving the 
father to look after three young children. Mr. Smith's uncle and grand- 
father died at Montreal of the cholera. After reaching York his father 
rented two rooms on Y onge Street, and obtained work as a mason's clerk. 
He afterwards became a labourer in Helliwell's Brewery, and died in 1849. 
His second son, Alfred, is a cooper in Drayton, Ontario. \Villiam Smith 
learned his trade with Reuben Parkinson, with whom he was for seven 
years. He began business for himself in 1843, and in 1847 purchased the 
property where his business now is, and on which he erected a waggon 
shop. He now gives employment to eight men. In religion l\Ir. Smith is 
a Methodist; he belongs to no political party, but votes on principle. In 
18 45 he married Edith, daughter of \Villiam Dellamore, a farmer in York 
Township. 


JOSHUA GRAFTON SNIDER, livery, etc., was born in the Township of 
York, December 29, 1833. His grandfather, Martin Snider, was born in 
Germany; he lived in the United States until the close of the Revolu- 
tionary \V ar, when he removed to New Brunswick; he afterwards came to 
York Township, his son, Thomas, the father of Joshua, being only eighteen 
months old. Thomas Snider was eighteen years of age at his father's death. 



City of Toronto. 


15 1 


He resided on the old farm until he came of age, when he moved to a farm 
of his own in the rear of the old homestead, where he lived until his death 
in 1856. On January 3, 1833, he married Catharine Grafton, daughter of 
Stewart Grafton, by whom he had seven children. Joshua Snider was 
working on a farm of his own until his father's death, when he went on the 
old homestead farm which he worked for about ten years. He then went 
to York l\Iills, where he remained for three years. His wife, a daughter 
of Thomas Lackie, whom he had married in 1857. died there. He then 
went to Cincinnati. In 1871 he came to Toronto, where he has been ever 
since. In 1873 he married a Miss l\IcCallum. In politics he is a Reformer. 
George S. Snider, the second son of Thomas Snider, was born in 1836. In 
1861 he married Elizabeth I\1. \Yalker. 


:\IARTIN EDWARD SNIDER, dentist, Bay Street, Toronto, was born in 
the Township of York in 1845. His father, Thomas Snider, was born in 
New Brunswick in 1810, and came to Little York about the same year 
with pis father, Martin Snider, a U .E. Loyalist, who took up land in the 
Township of York, where he died. The wife of the elder 
Iartin Snider 
died in York Township at the age of one hundred and three. The father 
of our subject lived in 'York Township from 1810 until his death, which 
occurred in 1856. In 18+9 he was commissioned a Lieutenant of the York 
Militia t two commissions signed by Lord Elgin and one by Sir Edmund 
\V. Head. At his death he left a widow and five sons, as follow: Joshua 
Grafton lives in Toronto; George Stewart lives in Toronto; Thomas 
Albert lives in Cincinnati, 0.; Martin Edward, and John Elgin live in 
Toronto. l\lartin Snider received his first education at the old Grammar 
School, and began his studies at Upper Canada College in 1857, being then 
twelve years of age. In 1861 he began to study his profession in Toronto; 
he spent one year in the United States: In 1867 he returned to Toronto, 
where he'has been ever since. His wife is Hannah \Vilkinson, daughter 
of one of the oldest settlers in the town of 1\1 uddy York. He has been 
Returning-officer for St. George's \Vard for thirteen years. In politics he 
is a Reformer. 


ALBERT \Y. SPAULDING, dentist, 51 King Street East, was born in 
Durham County in 1848. His father was Joseph Lovell Spaulding and his 
mother Sarah Hepinstall. Mr. Spaulding taught school for five years, in 
Huron County, after which he studied dentistry with I\1r. \V. C. Adams, in 
Toronto. In 1878 he graduated at the Toronto Dental College, where he 
afterwards taught, during the sessions of 1880-1 and 1881-2. 



15 2 


Biograpltical Notices. 


JAMES SPENCE, carpenter and builder, was born in County Armagh, 
Ireland, in 1808, and was the eldest in a family of four sons and four 
daughters. His parents were Thomas and Margaret (\Vhitten) Spence, 
both of whom were born in the County of Armagh. \Vhile he was still a 
boy he came to Canada, ftnd located at Kingston where he seryed three 
years learning the carpenter trade. Then he came to Little York, and for 
a few years worked with John Harper. For many years he did work for 
Judge Hagerman and Chief Justice Robinson. In 1835 he built the house 
in which he now resides at 99 Elizabeth Street. He bought the lot from 
Judge Hagerman, and paid $]00 for it. Mr. Spence has held several 
public offices. In April, 1856, he was appointed License Inspector for St. 
John's \Vard, and has in his possession a watch which was presented to him 
by the hotel-keepers as a mark of their esteem. For twelve years he was 
Assessor in different \Vards, St. James's, St. Andrew's and St.John's. He 
was collector for St. John's \Vard for three years, and represented that 
\Vard in the City Council for the same length of time. He has made 
considerable money in real estate transactions. Mr. Spence married Eliza 
Lockie, born in Tyrone, Ireland, by whom he has had one son and three 
daughters. The son, Thomas, is dead. He was in the Toronto Custom 
House for eight years. His daughters are married, the eldest is Mrs. 
Foster; the second to \Villiam Reid, who is in the Custom House; the 
third to James Carruthers, a bootmaker on Teraulay Street. In politics 
Mr. Spence is a Conservative, in religion he is a member of the Church of 
England. During the Mackenzie Rebellion Mr. Spence went out to find 
Dr. Rolph, whom he wanted to attend his wife who was ill. As he made 
very anxious enquiries after the doctor, and refused to tell his business, he 
was arrested by his own party on suspicion of being a rebel, and was taken 
before a magistrate (John Armstrong), who sent two volunteers to accom- 
pany him in his search br the doctor. He was afterwards released, and 
served with the volunteers under Captain Powell, and was on Y onge Street 
at the dispersion of the rebels. 


CHARLES SPROAT, City Engineer, is the youngest son of the late Alder- 
man Henry Sproat, who died in 1875. Mr. Sproat, sen'r, was a native of 
Cumberland, England, and came to Canada in the year 1821. He settled 
in York and devoted his attention to farming, but in 1844 he relinquished 
his agricultural pursuits and commenced business in the city as a merchant. 
He took an active part in municipal affairs, and in 1856 was elected Coun- 
cillor, and, three years later, Alderman, for St. Andrew's \Vard. During his 
term of office, which extended over a period of seven years, he occupied 



City of Toronto. 


153 


the position of Chairman of the Fire, Water and Gas Committee, and also 
of the Board of Works, and was a genuine mover in (jþffecting the introduc- 
tion of the new fire system. In 1863 he withdrew from active participation 
in municipal affairs, and shortly afterwards purchased the brewery on Queen 
Street vVest, known as Cosgrave & Sproat's; but a few years later he sold 
his interest in the concern and retired from business altogether. His son, 
Charles, the present city engineer, was born in Toronto in 1836, and 
received his education at Upper Canada and Knox Colleges. He selected 
the profession of engineer as his future career in life, and became a pupil of 
the late Frank Shanley, C.E., with whom he was engaged in the survey of 
the Toronto and Guelph Railway, afterwards amalgamated with the Grand 
Trunk, and, on the completion of this undertaking, on the Midland Railway 
survey. He was afterwards employed as Government Surveyor in the 
districts north-east of Toronto, and subsequently as District Engineer on the 
Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway, and in connection with the latter road 
he was later on promoted to the position of Resident Engineer. \l\,Then Mr. 
Shanley entered upon the duties of City Engmeer of Toronto, Mr. Sproat 
received the appointment of Deputy Surveyor, and it was under his super- 
intendence, while holding that office, that the present sewage system of the 
city was constructed. Mr. Sproat next connected himself with the Georgian 
Bay and Wellington Railway, connecting Palmerston and Durham, in the 
capacity of Chief Engineer, and was afterwards engaged in the Canadian 
Pacific Railway survey in the Rocky Mountains, where he remained until 
his appointment as City Engineer of Toronto, on the 24th of September, 
1883. In 1863 Mr. Sproat married Miss Fral}ces Jane Lawrence, daughter 
o
 Mr. Joseph Lawrence, formerly of Toronto, but now a resident of 
Collingwood. 


VVILLlAM STANLEY, deceased, was born in Toronto in 1836. He was a 
painter by trade, and conducted a large and successful business in fresco- 
paintiQg, graining and decorating, which he commenced in 1859' He was 
a Unitarian, and a member of the Oddfellows Society. He was also con- 
nected with the Tenth Royals and Queen's Own for many years; and was 
an active member of the Ontario Rifle Association. Mr. Stanley married in 
1856 Elizabeth James, and at his death left a widow, two sons and four 
daughters. 


RICHARD GEORGE STAPELLS, professor of music, 263 Berkeley Street, 
was born at Rochester, Kent, England, and came to Canada in 1873, locat- 
· ing in Toronto, where he has since remained. He studied under Thomas 



154 


Biographical Notices. 


Harcourt, Esq., the choir-master of Rochester Cathedral, and George 
Newsome, Esq., a prCJfessor also of that city. Mr. Stapells is organist of 
Grace Church, and also gives vocal and instrumental instruction to pupils. 
THOMAS H. STARK, M.D., 97 Bond Street, is a native of Beauharnors, 
Quebec, being the son of \Villiam Stark, school-teacher. He is a graduate 
of Trinity University and Trinity School, and was for some years Resident 
Assistant Surgeon at Toronto General Hospital, and in 1882 commenced 
practice in this city. 


N. L. STEINER, marble dealer, Toronto, was born in Bohemia, Austria, 
in 1832, being the eleventh in a family of fourteen children. His father, 
\7\1 olfgang Steiner, was a Government contractor. Mr. Steiner was educated 
in Vienna, and in 1848 left his home and went to New York, where he spent 
three years learning sculpturing. After having learned the business he was 
for a few months located in Buffalo. In 1852 he came to Toronto, and 
commenced business on Parliament Street, afterwards removing to King 
Street. His next location was at the corner of Y onge Street and \Vilton 
Avenue, where he carried on a large business for twenty-four years, 
employing over thirty men. In 1880 he removed to his present place on 
the corner of \Vilton Avenue and Victoria Streets. In 1876 Mr. Steiner 
married a daughter of the Rev. Dr. Leon Sternberger of New York. In 
1880 he was elected to represent St. James's Ward in the City.Council, 
obtaining the largest vote ever polled. He sat for two years, and then 
retired. He was elected in 1883, being once more at the head of the poll- 
and in 1884 by acclamation. In 1870. he was commissioned a J.P. In 
politics he is a Reformer. i\1r. Steiner is Past-Master of the A.F. and A.M. 
of Toronto, and also President of the German Society. 
VV. ST. CROIX, 7 North Street, Toronto. Among the many who have 
settled in Toronto in the past thirty years, and added to its substantial 
growth and prosperity, there are few who have overcome greater diffi- 
culties in achieving an honourable success in business than the subject of 
this sketch. Mr. St. Croix was born on the Island of Jersey in 1834, of 
Huguenot extraction. In early life he learned the trade of bricklayer and 
plasterer, and later travelled through France, England, and a portion of 
the United States, arriving in Toronto in 1854 with only one York shilling, 
which constituted his entire wealth. He not only struggled with poverty, 
but, being in a strange country, was wholly unable to comprehend the 
language of the people. For the first year after his arrival he worked as a 
journeyman, during which time he improved his leisure hours in the study · 



City of Toronto. 


155 


of the English language. He soon after began business for himself in a 
small way, which gradually increased until it assumed vast proportions; 
with honesty, industry and frugality for his motto, his labours have been 
crowned with success. During the past thirty years he has erected many 
public and private buildings, among which were the present Police Station 
and Court House, near the Post Office, Phænix Block on Front Street, and 
several warehouse blocks on Yonge Street. In 1880 he purchased a portion 
of the Elmsley Estate, west of Y onge Street, consisting of one thousand 
feet frontage on Bloor Street North and St. Mary Street, upon which he 
has erected about forty handsome two-storey brick residences, a portion of 
which he has sold and rented, besides many other private residences in 
various parts of the city. He has annually employed from sixty to seventy- 
five men. As an instance of the amount of labour performed in one branch 
of his business-plastering-in one year, his contracts amounted to thirty- 
five thousand dollars. The average wages he has paid his men during a 
period of thirty years has been one dollar and twenty-five cents to two 
dollars per day. More recently he has ènlarged his business, and now 
contracts for 
he construction of buildings from the digging of the cellar to 
the finishing and turn of the key. At the present time he owns over fifty 
beautiful residences and stores in various parts of the city. In politics he 
is a Reformer; in religion, a member of the Bond Street Congregational 
Church, where he has acted in the capacity of a deacon for many years. 
In 1860 he married a daughter of James Kerr, an old resident of Toronto, 
of Scottish extraction. 


QUETTON ST. GEORGE. In 1791, when the French Revolution was 
raging, a British Legion was raised in England for the purpose of rescuing 
Louis XVI., then a prisoner in the Tuileries, and restoring him to the throne 
of his ancestors. Two brothers, Laurent and EtIenne Quetton, went over 
to England and enlisted. The Republicans were then. a cruel race, the 
guillotine and confiscatIon of property being the order of the day. They 
were particularly hard on those families which were known to have some 
member fighting for the King. On that account the Duc d'Angoulême, 
who was then in London taking a great interest in the organization of the 
said Legion, advised all Frenchmen who enlisted in it to change their 
names, and assume for a time a nom de guerre. The brothers Quetton were 
therefore enrolled in the army list as Laurent and Etienne St. George. 
They went over to France in October, 1791, and from that year they were 
engaged in active and hard service. Etienne was shot and died on the field 
of honour at Brestien, the 8th of December, 1798. Laurent was more fortu- 



15 6 


Biographical Notices. 


nate, and rose rapidly. He was born at Verrazses, near Montpelier, in 
the.Province of Languedoc, June 4th, 1771. He was barely twenty when he 
joined the British Legion. The official record of his campaigns shows that 
he distinguished himself in many engagements, and was gradually promoted. 
In April, 1796, we find him Lieutenant-Colonel, and in June the same 
year he was made Chevalier of the Royal and Military Order of St. Louis. 
In 1798, the Royalist armies being completely routed and all but annihi- 
lated by the Republicans, some of the survivors 
were fortunate enough to 
escape to England, where those who belonged to th
 British Legion were 
treated as retired British officers, and received grants of land in Canada. 
Among them was Colonel St. George, who then resumed his proper name 
of Quetton St. George; his descendants still retaining the two names. His 
grant of land was on the Oak Ridges, at the corner of the. four townships of 
Vaughan, Markham, Whitchurch and King. Several other French officers, 
General de Puisaye, Count and Viscount de Chalus, and others were also 
located at Oak Ridges, in what is known to this day as the French settle- 
ment. Their first attempt to examine their location was not made by rail, 
nor even by stage or waggon. Having left York on horseback, when 
they came to Hogg's Hollow they found the river so sw
llen that any 
attempt at wading through it, the only way of getting across in those days, 
was out of the question. They left their horses at a farm, and were directed 
to an Indian path where a pine tree felled across the stream did duty as a 
bridge for foot passengers. They went up to the Ridges on foot. Some of 
them actually settled on their lots; but the Chevalier de St. George very 
soon came to the conclusion that a man who had not been brought up to it 
was more likely to break his back than to make a fortune by felling trees 
and piling them into log heaps to clear the land. He returned to York, 
and started as a merchant at the corner of King and Frederick Streets. He 
became very popular with the farmers at Markham, then the best settled 
township north of York. He traded also with the Indians, and a few years ago 
an old house fire-place was to be seen in Rama Island, Lake Simcoe, which 
was known to have been a fort, as they called it in those days, where he 
met the Indians every year. His business prospered, and he built the 
first brick house in York, still a very good and substantial one, now occupied 
by the Canada Company. He entered into partnership with Julius Quesnel 
and John Spread Baldwin, under the name and style of Quetton 5t. George 
& Co. Some curious do'cuments of Custom-house entries of those days are 
still preserved, and may be seen in the house of the sam{t name founded by 
his son, and now situated on King Street, a few doors west of Yonge Street. 
After the legitimate Kings of France had been restored to their throne, 



City of Toronto. 


157 


Quetton St. George, then an independent man, very naturally wished to 
revisit his native land and relatives. He was received with great distinc- 
tion by King Louis XVIII. His title of Chevalier, which had been given 
him in an informal sort of way when King and Princes were prisoners or 
exiles, was duly confirmed and registered, and he was given besides the 
decoration of the Lys, a distinction specially reserved for those who had 
remained true to their legitimate King during those troublous times. He 
was about returning to Canada when he died, at the comparatively early age 
of fifty, after a most,eventful and honourable life. A son of his is still living 
at Oak Ridges, and some grandchildren in the Province of Quebec. 


HENRY STONE, undertaker, 239 Yonge Street, was born in Queen's 
County, Ireland, in 1830, being the second eldest and only surviving one 
in a family Qf nine children. In 1831, his father Daniel Stone came to 
Canada and settled in Montreal, removing to Toronto in 1840, where he 
carried on business as a chandler on "VVellington and Edward Streets, until 
his death in 1855. Henry Stone was educated in Toronto, and when 
twenty years of age began business as a chandler on Edward Street. In 
1854 he was married to Susannah, second daughter of \Villiam Reid, who 
died 22nd November, 1880, in her forty-seventh year, by whom he has had 
fourteen children, four of whom are dead. In 1869 he bought out Chad- 
wick Fawkes, undertaker, and has carried on that business ever since. In 
politics he is a Conservative, and in religion a Methodist. 
ISAAC STONEHOUSE, retired, was born in England in 1812. His father, 
Joseph Stonehouse, was a carpenter by trade, and was born in Yorkshire. 
He came to Cal1ada in IHI9, with one of his sons, and settled on a farm in 
Etobicoke Township; the rest of his family followed him a year later. 
About 1854 he moved into Toronto, where he remained until his death, 
which occurred in 1858; his wife was Martha Rushforth. Isaac Stone- 
house was farming in Etobicoke until 1854, when he came to Toronto. He 
is now living retired, and has been so for some few years. He has one son 
and five daughters. In politics Mr: Stonehouse is a Reformer; in religion 
a Methodist. He has been a member of the Fruit Growers' Association for 
ten years. 
WILLIAM THEOPHILUS STUART, M.D., is a son of the Rev. James Stuart, 
and was born in Markham Township in 1853. He received his early 
education at Brantford, and later attended the Upper Canada College and 
Trinity Medical School, graduated in 1877 as M.B. In 1877 his acquir
- 
ments gained for him a gold medal at Trinity University, as well as the 



15 8 


Biographical l.Votices. 


. 


University gold medal, and Star gold medal at Toronto University. He 
commenced the practice of his profession in this city, where he remained 
one year, afterwards visiting the hospitals of Great Britain, and returning 
again to Toronto, has since continued a resident. having an extensive and 
increasing patronage. In 1877 Mr. Stuart became connected with the 
Central College as Lecturer on Anatomy and Physiology. In 1878 he was 
appointed Practical Chemist to Trinity Medical School. He is one of the 
visiting physicians to the Home of Incurables. He devotes much time to the 
study of Chemistry and Mineralogy. In 1881 he was married to Miss Maggie 
B. Gibson, of Lachine, by whom he has two children, a son anp a daughter. 
LESLIE M. SWEETNAM, M.D., is the eldest son of Mr. Matthew Sweet- 
nam, Post-office Inspector, of Toronto, and was born in Kingston, Ontario, 
on the 1st of August, 1859. He was educated at the Grammar School, King- 
ston, the Model School, Collegiate Institute, and Upper Canada College, 
Toronto. He attended the Toronto School of Medicine, and graduated 
M.B. at Toronto University in 1881 ; and M.D., Ch:M. at Victoria Univer- 
sity, Cobourg, in the same year. He was Resident Physician and Assistant 
House Surgeon on the staff of the General Hospital, Toronto, in 1881. 
Dr. Sweetnam commenced the reguiar practice of his profession in Toronto 
in 1882. He is a medical man of more than ordinary promise, and has a 
large and steadily increasing practice. He is on the medical staff of the 
House of Providence. 


ANDREW TINGLE, carpenter, was born in the Township of Scarboro' in 
1820, being the eldest in a family of thirteen children. His father was 
John Tingle, who was born near Leeds, England. He was a farmer. In 
1818 he came to Canada and, two years later, married Ellen, daughter of 
Andrew Thompson, who came to Canada from Scotland. He cleared a 
farm in the Township of Scarboro', and lived there until his death in 1877. 
He survived his wife two or three years. He served during the Rebellion 
of 1837, under Captain McLean; he was stationed in the city for two 
weeks, and then spent the winter on the Kingston Road. In 1841 Andrew 
Tingle married Agnes, daughter of J oh
 Reeve, of the Township of Clarke; 
she died about 1853, in the County of Oxford. His second wife was Mary, 
daughter of James Patton, of Scarboro' Township. By his first wife he 
had one son and two daughters, and by his second wife two sons and one 
daughter. In 1845 Mr. Tingle removed to the County of Oxford; he 
remained there until 1853, when he returned to Scarboro'. In r857 he 
came to Toronto and engaged in the trade of a carpenter. In politics he 
is a Reformer, and in religion a Presbyterian. 



City of Toronto. 


159 


JOHN TINNING, retired, third son of Richard Tinning, sen'r, was born 
at Brampton, October, 1832. In 1864 he married Jane Donley, daughter 
of Patrick Donley, by whom he has two sons and one daughter. 


RICHARD TINNING, deceased, was born in Cumberland, England, in 
1801, and about 1824 
arried Ann Tiffin, who was born at Durham, Eng- 
land, and died at Toronto, July 6, 1874, In 1832 he came to Canada with 
his wife and two children and settled in Toronto, locating himself at the 
foot of Bay Street on the shore of the Bay, where he established a timber 
and lumber business. His stock was cut principally at OakviUe and Port 
Credit, and after being thrown into the Lake was towed along the shore to 
his saw-mill, which was the first erected in Toronto. In 1840 he removed 
to the foot of York Street, and in 1846 erected a steam saw-mill where the 
St. James' Hotel now stands, and which was then the shore of the Bay. 
He leased for forty-two years th
 tract of land extending north from the 
Bay along York Street to Front Street; upon this he erected several build- 
ings, one a house, in which he resided. In 1834 he contracted with the 
University authorities to clear College Avenue of the heavy growth of trees 
and brushwood which covered it. Mr. Tinning continued to run his saw- 
mill, and did a prosperous business, until his death in 1858. He was a . 
member of the old fire company, and for six years was Alderman for St. 
Andrew's Ward. At his death he left a family of three sons and one 
daughter. 


RICHARD TINNING, jun'r, eldest SOI1- of Richard Tinning, sen'r, was 
born in Cumberland, England, in 1825, and in 1832 came to Canada with 
his father, with whom he was for years associated in the lumber business. 
He married the eldest daughter of \V. B. Hornibrook, by whom he has one 
son. For twelve or thirteen years he has represented S1. George's \Vard 
in the City Council. 


THOMAS TINNING, 39 Front Street \Vest, the second son of Richard 
and Ann (Tiffin) Tinning, was born in Carlisle, England, in the year 18 3 2 . 
His father was born in 1801, at the same place; his mother was a native of 
Durham, England, and died in Toronto, July 6th, 1874. Mr. Tinning, 
sen'r, married in 1824, and in the spring of 1832 emigrated to Canada with 
his wife and .two sons, Richard and Thomas. He landed in Quebec, and 
at once proceeded to Montreal, and from thence he came to Toronto, the 
journey being accomplished by Durham boats drawn by oxen. On their 
arrival here, the head of the family went to Brampton, leaving his wife and 
children in the city, but subsequently returned after a short absence and 



160 


Biographical Notices. 


located at the foot of Bay Street, on the shore of the bay. He established 
himself in the lumber trade, and for twenty years employed a large force of 
men cutting lumber by means of whip-saw;:;. In 1840 he moved to the foot . 
of York Street, and in 1846 erected a steam saw-mill upon the site of the 
present S1. James' Hotel. The mill was a frame building eighty feet in 
length, and would cut forty feet lengths of square lumber. He leased from 
the city for forty-two years a tract of land extending from the water's edge 
along York to Front Street upon which he erected buildings, and where 
he himself resided. In 1834 the contract was given Mr. Tinning to clear 
what is called College Avenue, which was then covered with a good growth 
of black ash, basswood and oak, together with a variety of other timber. 
In this work he employed a staff of forty men, and he himself cut down the 
first tree. All the timber felled in connection with this clearing was given 
to Mr. Tinning, and in addition a handsome recompense. It was subse- 
quently cut for firewood and sold to the citizens. While the work was 
being performed, an incident happened one day which created a slight 
sensation and, although it may appear paradoxical, will in truth call up 
startling reflections on the immense progress made by Toronto since that 
time. The incident referred to was a deer which ran across the avenue 
· from the direction of Rosedale and darted into the bush in a south-westerly 
direction. All the men gave chase, but the fleetness of the 'animal soon 
distanced the pursuers. Mr. Tinning continued to run his saw-mill until 
his death in 1858. He was a member of the old Fire Company; also a 
member of the A.F. and A.M. He was Alderman for St. Andrew's VVard si^- 
years. In political matters he was strongly Conservative, and in religion a 
member of the Church of England. At his death he left a family of three 
sons, Richard, Thomas, and John. Thomas Tinning, whose name appears 
at the commencement of this family record, was only an infant when his 
parents located in Toronto. Brought up beside that element on which 
he was destined to play thereafter many a gallant part, he imbibed 
that affection for aquatics which afterwards secured for him the Cham- 
pionship of Toronto Bay, which he maintained for so long a period. 
He assisted his father in the lumber business, which he has continued to 
carryon; but it is especially by those deeds of daring inspired by a desire 
to rescue human life from shipwrecked vessels that Mr. Thomas Tinning 
has earned the gratitude of the citizens of Toronto. He has dllring the last 
twenty years been the means of saving the lives of two hundred human beings 
from drowning in the lake and bay. The following examples bear testimony 
to the courage and endurance displayed on two memorable occasions in which 

1:r. Tinning was the principal actor. In the month of December, 1856, a 



City of Torollto. 


161 


schooner, named J. G. Beard, went ashore on the south side of the Island 
during a furious gale. The crew had taken refuge in the rigging; and, 
observing the wreck by the aid of his glass, together with the perilous 
. position of the crew, Mr. Tinning immediately launched his skiff and rowed 
over the bay and, hauling his boat across the Island, succeeded in pulling 
off to the wreck in the face of a tremendous sea. This feat was not easily 
accomplished, and he was thrice upset while attempting it, but on the 
fourth trial he reached with his skiff the unfortunate crew, who were 
eventually rescued. The weather "as bitterly cold, and during the long 
hours that passed while undertaking this meritorious action his clothes 
became coated with ice. In December, 1861, the schooner Pacific, while 
attempting to make the Queen's \Vharf during a violent gale was driven 
ashore in the Humber Bay. The position of the vessel, and the probable 
fate of the crew caused Mr. Howard of High Park to hasten to Toronto, 
and, if possible, bring back a relief party with him to make the attempt to 
save the shipwrecked crew. He called upon Mr. Thomas Tinning, who 
got together some volunteers, and taking with him one of the life boats of 
the steamer Zimmerman, proceeded at once on a sleigh to the scene of the 
wreck. After considerable difficulty and much danger, they succeeded in 
rescuing the crew, and as the success was in a great measure the result of 
Mr. Tinning's individual exertions, in which he displayed great promptitude, 
coolness and daring, he was shortly after the event presented by the 
citizens of Toronto with a handsome trophy in recognitipn of his valuable 
services. The presentation took the form of a splendid piece of silver rock- 
work, surrounding a representation of water in glass, with an appropriate 
mermaid figure in the centre holding a nautilus shell of frosted cut-glass 
made to contain flowers. The following inscription is engraved on a 
silver shield: "Presented to Thomas Tinning by a few of his friends 
and fellow-citiz
ns for his gallant behaviour in rescuing the crew of the 
schooner Pacific, wrecked in the Humber Bay, December, 1861: Toronto, 
l\Iay, 1862." These two instances we have given will be proof sufficient of 
what benefit his long residence in Toronto has been to the saving of life 
from the dangers of the Lake, and will serve to impress the toilers of the 
deep with the conviction that Toronto is not behind other ports in possess- 
ing brave hearts and willing hands, ready to risk their own lives in the 
prospect of saving others. Among the list of vessels which he has been at 
different times the means of saving from entire destruction and consequent 
loss of valuable cargoes, we may mention the RaPid, Echo, Olive Branch, 
and the crew of the Fearless, in Ashbridge's Bay. On the 3rd August, 18 70, 
he was presented with a silver tea service for his great and successful 
12 



162 


BiograPhical Notz:ces. 


exertion in recovering the bodies after the deplorable and heart-rending 
catastrophe in the Bay of Hamilton that year. Mr. Buchanan made the 
presentation, and expressed to Mr. Tinning the views, in regard to him, of 
the citizens of 'Hamilton. "He had not only been the instrument of allevi- 
ating the distressed feelings of a family, but also of a community." The 
silver tea service bears the following inscription: "Presented by a few of 
the citizens of Hamilton to Thomas Tinning, as' a mark of their high 
appreciation of his services in recovering the bodies of the daughters of 
Thomas Swinyard, Esq., June 27, 1870." In 1870, Mr. Tinning was 
appointed by the Government Captain of the Life Saving Station at 
Toronto, which position he held for some years, finally relinquishing it on 
account of the small allowance made for the support of crew;boats, etc. 
Mr. Tinning is a well-built man of about six feet two inches in height, and 
a frame which proves him to be possessed of great muscular power. He 
married Miss Summer, the daughter of the late Bernal Summer, a pro- 
minent Niagara merchant, and grand-daughter of Dr. Cyrus, of Beamsville, 
an old U. E. Loyalist. Mr. Tinning has two sons; Frank, the eldest, is 
fast following in the footsteps of his father, having in 1882 saved two young 
men from drowning in Georgian Bay. William, the other son, is in the 
Custom House. 


JOHN M. TINSLEY, retired, 81 Agnes Street, was born in Richmond, 
Virginia, in 1783. His grandfather, Thomas Tinsley, came to America 
from Ireland during the time of Oliver Cromwell, and located at Hanover- 
town, twentv-one miles from Richmond. He had four sons, Thomas, 
Peter, John ;nd Samuel. The father of our subject was Samuel Tinsley, 
who was born in Ireland, and who married Elizabeth Merrywether, who 
was born in Virginia. He was a Captain in the Revolutionary War, and 
was in many of the battles. He died in Virginia in 1815. The early boy- 
hood of our subject was spent in Richmond, where he went to school. In 
1800 he began to learn the trade of a carpenter, and in 1807 he was a 
journeyman. He married Douglas Dailey in 1811. In 1831 he paid a visit 
to Canada, spending some weeks at Toronto, and at the vVilberforce settle- 
ment near London. He returned to Richmond where he remained until 
18 37, in which year he removed to Cincinnati. In 1842 he came to Toronto 
and opened a grocery store on the corner of Albert and Elizabeth Streets, 
which business he continued for one year; his wife died in 18 4 2 . He then 
worked at the carpenter trade for John Harper and for J. George Joseph. 
Mr. Tinsley has long since ceased to work. He has not been able to read 
for the last ten years, but he can see things at a distance. \Vhen he was 



City of Toronto. 


16 3 


fifteen years old he saw George \Vashington, who used to visit some families 
in Richmond. His family were very long-lived. A sister, Polly, who was 
born in 1775, was living in New Orleans in 1870 when Mr. Tinsley last heard 
from her. Mr. Tinsley is a Reformer in politics and a Baptist in religion. 


ROBERT TROTTER was born in the County Cavan, Ireland. He spent 
the early part of his life in County Louth, from which place he emigrated to 
Canada in 1837, and at once took up his residence in this city. He was for 
a time connected with the police force, and was clerk of the market for 
some years. He has for many years been a successful speculator in real 
estate, and" now owns a large amount of property in this city. 


The career of MRS. JENNY K. TROUT, M.D., of Toronto, furnishes an 
excellent illustration of what a woman possessing pluck and perseverance 
may accomplish. Dr. Trout was born in the year 1840, in the pretty town 
of Kelso, Roxburghshire, Scotland. Her parents, Andrew and Elizabeth 
Gowanlock, emigrated to Canada when she was but seven years old, and 
at the age of seventeen we find her still living with them in a sparsely 
populated district near Stratford, Ontario. Her education was only of an 
imperfect rudimentary nature, but books were her close companions and 
she read them with a fixed determination to acquire knowledge. About 
this time she commenced attending the little country schools with a view to 
qualifying as a teacher. \Vhen nineteen years old she graduated from the 
Toronto Normal School, and was shortly afterwards placed in charge of a 
school in the northern. part of her own township. Labouring in this 
capacity and neighbourhood for nearly five years, she was able, by industry 
and good husbandry, to accumulate a considerable sum of money. It was 
during her fifth teaching year, 1864, that she married Mr. Ewart Trout, of 
Toronto, and subsequently removed to that city. One of her youthful 
ambitions was to become a physician. Loss of health intensified this 
ambition and having made good use of her spare hours she succeeded in 
matriculating in 1870. Her health at this time was so poor as to excite 
the serious apprehension of her medical adviser and friends, but notwith- 
standing she attended-during 1871-72-a full course of lectures at the 
Toronto School of Medicine. An account of the trials and tribulations 
which she underwent would prove as instructive as interesting, but our 
space will not permit of it. Dr. Trout was one of the first to apply for 
admission to the lectures in the University, this being the place where the 
students of the Toronto School assembled for Chemistry lectures, but the 
Faculty denying admittance to women, she was, with others, compelled to 



1 6 4 


Biographical Notices. 


forego for a time the study of this branch of medicine. After a three years' 
course of the \Yomen's 'Medical College, Philadelphia, she received the 
degree of M.D., and immediately upon her return to Canada, successfully 
passed the examinations before the Council of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Ontario. Dr. Trout has the honour of being the first woman who passed 
the Ontario Council, and also held the position for many years of being the 
only lady member of the college. She now entered upon the duties of her 
new profession in Toronto, being joined by Dr. E. Amelia Tifft, a graduate 
of the same school and class in Philadelphia. It was not long before they 
opened a woman's dispensary, in the eastern part of the city, which, how- 
ever, they were, owing to the demands made upon them as physicians, 
compelled to abandon. Dr. Trout was, for a time, one of the two visiting 
physicians connected with the Infants' Home in its early days. The 
lady doctors have made popular a comparatively new agent in the practice 
of medicine in Canada, i.e., Electricity. In order to successfully develop 
the capabilities of this curative power, they founded what proved to be one 
of the best institutions of its kind in the Dominion, occupying a handsome 
white-brick structure on the corner of Jarvis and Gerrard Streets, and facing 
the Baptist Church. Dr. Trout's health, never robu9-t, improved slightly for a 
time, but ultimately gave way under the heavy strain of her large and 
increasing practice, until utterly worn out, she was compelled in 1883 to 
retire from the laborious duties of the Institution. Dr. Trout has ever 
taken a lively interest in the education and advancement of the younger 
members of her sex. She has, wholly or in part, aided more than one young 
woman to obtain the degree of M.D. In thoro)lgh sympathy with the 
objection to mixed classes in the schoolroom, she was anxious to see a 
Women's Medical College in Canada and, in 1883, offered to liberally endow 
such an establishment in Toronto; but the promoters hampered it with 
such conditions that she transferred her support and influence to Kingston, 
where a college had been opened, which is in a flourishing condition. 
She has also been an earnest and successful worker in the cause of Temper- 
ance, having filled, at sundry times, the office of President, Vice-President, 
and Secretary of the \\Toman's Christian Temperance Union. The subject 
of our sketch is to-day Vice-President for Canada of the Association for the 
Advancement of Women. She is a member of the Jarvis Street Baptist 
Church, is liberal in her principles and tolerant in her religious views. 


W. vV. TURNER, M.D., was born at Millbrook, Ontario, 1849, and is 
the eldest son of Charles Turner of that place. In early life he attended 
the Public and Grammar Schools at Brighton, Ontario, afterwards study- 



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PROFESSOR S. VERNOY. 



City of Toronto. 


1 6 5 


ing at Victoria University, receiving a diploma in 1867. He attended 
various hospitals in N ew York, and graduated from Belleyue Hospital 
College. Dr. Turner first commenced practice in \Vinnipeg in 1876, where 
he remained five years and during his residence performed some very 
skilful surgical operations which made him quite a celebrity. He settled 
in Parkdale in 1882, and has already a large and lucrative practice. He 
is on the medical staff of the Home for Incurables, and during the present 
year read a påper before the Ontario Medical Association which was 
receiv
d and commented on with favour. Dr. Turner married, in 1872, 
Julia Laughton, of Hamilton, by whom he has one daughter. 
CHARLES K. UNWIN, Deputy Registrar of the County of York, is the 
son of Charles and Elizabeth Unwin, the former a native of England and 
the latter of Irish descent. His father married after he came here in 1835. 
He was employed in the office of Mr. Samuel Ridout for about fifteen years, 
afterwards being connected with the Beaver Mutual Insurance Company. 
Charles K. was born in 1853 in this city, and has been connected with the 
Registry Office about six years. 


PROFESSOR VERNOY, the founder and proprietor of the Electro-Thera- 
peutic Institution, 197 Jarvis Street, Toronto, is a native of N ew York. He 
commenced the practice of electro-therapeutics in Pennsylvania in 1869, 
according to the new theory, as discovered and promulgated in that branch 
of science, proving it to be a success. In 1876 Professor Vernoy was 
induced to leave Philadelphia for Canada; he accordingly settled on Jarvis 
Street, Toronto, where he established himself as an electro-therapeutist. 
Since his arrival here the success attending the exercise of his profession 
in the new and wide field of the Dominion has been marvellous, and has 
won for him a wide reputation in the cure of nervous diseases and those 
not successfully dealt with by other means. This new system of treatment 
by the application of electricity is becoming more popular and interesting 
year by year, from the fact that well-attested evidence has shown that 
wonderful cures have been effected by its use when all other means have 
failed. In his paper, The Electric Age, Professor Vernoy records numerous 
testimonials (given for the purpose by individuals of unquestionable reputa- 
tion in our midst) as to the sav
ng of life and restoration to health by his 
new system of electro-therapeutic treatment. Many of those who have 
been thus benefited by him have expressed their willingness and desire to 
aid him in his endeavours to relieve suffering humanity; hence, in order to 
satisfy the enquiries of those who desire proof of his great success (by 
direct communication), a list of many important cases is recorded in his 


. 



166 


Biographical Notices. 


paper. Professor Vernoy's Electro-Therapeutic Institution is situated on 
one of the finest and most beautiful streets in the city, within five minutes' 
walk of the Post-office and the business centre, and can accommodate a 
limited number of patients, who are made to feel pleasantly at home, their 
comfort and convenience being consulted. In connection with his large 
experience and practice in the use of electricity, Professor Vernoy has 
devoted his attention to the production of a superior Electro-Medical 
Battery suited to all varieties of human temperament and the various 
classes of disease. This delicate instrument is so nicely arranged that 
individuals who cannot conveniently enter the Institution for treatment 
may, by obtaining one of them, take treatment at home successfully by 
following the instructions given. 


JOHN JOSEPH VICKERS, proprietor of the celebrated Express Company 
of that name, was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1818, being the second son of 
John and Hannah (Leeson) Vickers of that city. His father held a govern- 
ment position in the Treasury Department for many years, and his death 
occurred when John Joseph was but six years old. Our subject's early 
education was acquired in Dublin, and when a young man he entered the 
service of the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company, and remained with 
them several years. In 1849 he went to New York, bearing introductory 
letters from James McHenry, Esq., of Liverpool, and entering the service of 
the Howard Steamship Company, he continued in their employ two years. 
In the meantime, having heard of the splendid agricultural prospects of 
Canada, young Vickers, who lacked neither energy nor ambition, dejermined 
to try his hand at farming, and, putting his resolution into effect, moved to 
the Bay of Quinte district and settled upon a farm in Princé Edward's 
County. Two years' practice as an amateur farmer convinced 1\1r. Vickers 
that rolling logs and growing buckwheat was more of a reality than he antici- 
pated, hence he abandoned agriculture and left for Toronto. In 1852 he 
engaged with the American Express Company and continued in their 
service two years. On the completion of the Northern Railroad, he 
embarked in the express business on his own account, and by strict atten- 
tion and great exertions he has developed his present extensive connection, 
a statistical account of which is given elsewhere in this volume. In 1859, 
in conjunction with others, Mr. Vickers visited the Lake Superior district 
in the first steamer (The Rescue) to Thunder Bay. He then noticed that 
the mouth of the Kaministiquia River would in the near future be a great 
harbour, and, acting on his own prophetic instincts, he purchased all the 
land obtainable in that region after its survey by the Government, and now 




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City of Toronto. 


16 7 


O\vns nearly half of the navigable portion of the river frontage on the north 
side, the Canadian Pacific Railway running through the greater portion of 
his property. He owns about seven thousand acres, upon which are valu- 
able mines of silver, slate and large quantities of fine sandstone. Since 
his settlement in Toronto he has taken an active interest in all that concerns 
the city's welfare, and was elected alderman to represent St. George's 
\Vard in 1864, and remained in the Council until 1870. During the time 
he was a member of that body he proposed the resolution to construct the 

ew \Yater \Vorks, which was carried October 10, 1870. He is captain 
in the Sedentary 
Iilitia, having held a commission for many years. Mr. 
Yickers' political opinions are strongly Conservative. In 1855 he married 
Catharine :\lary, eldest daught{!r of the late John \V. Dunbar :\loodie; first 
Sheriff of Hastings County (her mother being Susanna Moodie, the eminent 
authoress, whose" Roughing it in the Bush II and other publications have 
contributed not a little to our national literature). The issue of this marriage 
are four sons and six daughters, all living ; the eldest son, John A. D. Vick- 
ers, being active superintendent of the Express Company. \\'illiam \V. is 
a student at the University. Victor Gillmor Ridgeway is supposed to he 
the only boy born in Toronto the morning the Queen's Own Rifles left for 
the frontier on the memorable First of June, 1866, at the time of the Fenian 
raid; the Civic Council choosing the name in honour of the event and 
Colonel Gillmor acting as godfather. 
\Y. J. \Y AGSER, :M.D., 7 Gerrard Street, was educated at Toronto 
Grammar School and Upper Canada College, and studied medicine at 
Toronto School of :Medicine. He graduated at Toronto l:'niversity in 1870 
and commenced practice the same year on Queen Street. 


JAYES \YALLIS, 104 Cumberland Street, Yorkville, was born in Cumber- 
land, England, July 29, 1807, and came to Toronto in February, 1828. He 
worked two years for Jacob Hutchinson on Front Street, and then began 
business for himself as blacksmith on King Street East. He removed to 
Yorkville in 1831 and has been in business there about fifty years. Mr. 
\Yallis was one of the first members of the Y orkville Council and remained 
in that body two years, afterwards for several years occupying the respon- 
sible position of Treasurer to the Council. He belonged to the old fire 
brigade, and took part on the loyalist side during the Rebellion of I837
38. 
He is a member of Bloor Street )'lethodist Church. In )'Iay, 1828, he was 
married to Ann Greenwell, of Cumberland, England, who died )Iay 5, 1837. 
)'Ir. \Yallis was married a second time to Esther Hodg-son, who is also a 
'TIember of the same church as himself. 


. 



168 


Biographical Notices. 


JA:\1:ES JOHN \V ALSH was born in Cheshire, England, in 1833, and came 
to Canada in 1861, taking up his residence in Toronto, where he has since 
remained. He was for many years engaged in the live cattle export trade, 
and carried on successfully the largest wholesale butchering business for one 
man in the city. In 1880 he retired from business; since which time he has 
lived at his fine private residence on Kingston Road, called Cheshire Villa. 
JAMES \VALSH is a native of the City of Cork, Ireland, where he was 
born in 1839, and when ten years of age emigrated to Canada and located 
first at Belleville, where he remained until 1859, after which he came to 
Toronto. Subsequently he removed to London, Ont., and after a residence 
of five years there he returned to this city, where he has since lived. He 
engaged in the manufacture of soda and mineral waters, which business he 
conducted from 1868 to 1883, retiring from trade in the latter year. In 
18 7 1 he married :\iary Jane, daughter of David Slee. Mr. \Valsh built the 
Berkeley Terrace from Nos. 122 to 134, and also owned the soda water 
factory and house No. 220 Berkeley Street. 
BENJAMIN \VALTON was born at Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, 
181 9, youngest son of Jonathan and Sarah (Wood) \Valton. His father 
was a cloth merchant. Mr. \Valton in early life had very good advantages 
for an education, which he diligently improved, and subsequently learned 
the trade of a stone-mason and builder. In 1844 he came to Toronto and 
worked as a journeyman until 18+8, when he embarked in the building 
business for himself; his first contract was for the construction of the stone 
work for Osgoode Hall, for which he received $50,000. After its comple- 
tion he laid the basement of Toronto University, and subsequently erected 
the Mechanics' Institute (now the Public Library), Bank of British North 
Amerjca, Custom House, Examining \Varehouses, and many other build- 
ings. He purchased one thousand five hundred acres of land on the Grand 
Trunk Railway, at Melbourne, P.Q., where he expended a large sum of 
money in opening a slate quarry; one year later he shipped the first car- 
load of Canadian slate that was ever brought into Toronto. He continued 
his slate industry until he had expended nearly $80,000, when, in 1883, 
with a view of meeting the demands of their largely-increasing trade, he 
organized a joint stock company (under the ::\Iining Act) called the" Domin- 
ion Mining Company," with a capital of $100,000 (he being one of the 
largest stock-holders), since which time his business has materially increased; 
they now employ over sixty men. The demand for their slate, which is of 
very superior quality, has steadily increased, and they are now exporting 
large quantities to England, Australia, Cape of Good Hope and United 



City of Toro1lto. 


16 9 


States. Notwithstanding there is a duty imposed of twenty pêr cent. they 
are doing a large business in exporting to the North-West. The quarry is 
situated six miles from Richmond station, on the Grand Trunk Railway, 
where quite a little village is springing up. In 1848 Mr. vValton married 
Eliza, daughter of Thomas Glasco, by whom he had one son and four 
daughters. Mr. \Valton died 3rd January, 1885. 
JOHN \VALZ was born in Germany in 1830 and came to Canada in 
1857, locating first at Preston, near Galt, where he remained one year. He 
then came to Toronto and started as brewer in 1858, which business he 
carried on up to 1882, since which time he has been living retired. In 1859 
he marrieå Miss Josephine Bandel, by whom he has three daughters and 
two sons. The property of Mr. \Valz has a frontage of two hundred and 
five feet on Sherbourne Street and three hundred on Duchess Street, on 
which he has erected fifteen houses. 
A. J. 1\1. \V ATKINS, Superintendent of the Horticultural Gardens, is a 
native of the City of Hereford, England, his father being a florist and seed 
merchant in that city. During his father's life-time our subject was 
thoroughly grounded in the business, and his whole life has been spent in 
the care oi flowers, shrubs, trees and lawns. He came to Canada in 1870, 
and was foreman with Fleming, the propagator and seedsman, for two years. 
He was for a time engaged in market gardening, and in 1875 accepted his 
present position. He took the gardens when the ground was a swamp and 
waste, and then made it to blossom with roses. 
JOHN WATSON was born in the village of Bedford, Missisque County, 
Quebec, and is the third of a family of four children born to John and 
Sarah (Botham) vVatson who, removing from Quebec Province, settled 
in York County in 1849. John was born in the year 1840, and was conse- 
quently but nine years of age when the family took up their residence here. 
His father was a carpenter and carried on business for many years and was 
eighty-four years of age when his death occurred in 1879. John early 
, learned his father's bU9iness, and for ten years worked as a journeyman, 
susequently, in 1860, commencing business for himself as builder and con- 
tractor, which he has since conducted, employing about fifteen men. He 
has, however, confined his share of the work to building wood work, letting 
out contracts for the brick and other work; he owns all the property he has 
put up, which now amounts to sixty-three houses scattered through four 
\Vards of the city. Mr. \Vatson is a member of the Methodist Church; 
also, he takes an active part in the Salvation Army in Toronto and other 
towns; he was the means, assisted by two friends, of securing that valuable 
lot on the corner of James and Albert Streets, at a cost of $7,000, on which 



170 


Biographical Notices. 


the Salvatioh Army Temple is being erected. His father and mother are 
from England and came out about the year 1818; his father returned to 
England and came back to Canada a second time; he served in the Rebel- 
lion of 1837, and took up arms to defend the Government round Missisque 
Bay, on the Vermont frontier. 
TOM \VEBB, baker and confectioner, corner of Y onge and Agnes Streets, 
is the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Parker) \Vebb, who carne to Canada 
from England in 1842. His father carried on the business of a baker and 
confectioner in the stand now occupied by Tom, from 1842 until 1875, when 
he retired and removed to Deer Park, where he now resides. Mr. \Vebb, 
sen'r, had three sons, Edward, a lawyer in London, England:who died 
December, 1884; Harry and Tom who are both in the bakery business: 
and one daughter, Mrs. John Wightman. Tom was born in Toronto in 
1849, and succeeded to his father's business in 1875. In 1873 he married a 
daughter of Henry James Clark. 
HENRY G. WHITE is a native of New Hartford, Conn., and came to 
Canada in 1854. He was a builder, sash, door and frame manufacturer, 
having served his time in Connecticut. On his' arrival here he entered the 
service of Alexander Manning as foreman, after which he spent some time 
in Vaughan Township, where he built and fitted up several saw-mills, from 
thence he again came to Toronto and was foreman of the first exhibition 
building there. He then went to Bothwell and was manager for the oil 
works there two years, subsequently becoming manager for the Des Moines 
Valley Oil Company. From there he went to Muskegon as engineer in a 
large mill, from which place he returned to Toronto, and engaged in car 
building about two years. After spending a short time in Bradford, in 
1875 he took charge of the wood-working machinery in the Northern Rail- 
way shops, which position he still retains. 
ISAAC WHITE, deceased, was born at Rutland, Vermont, April 9, 1792. 
His ancestors emigrated from England to America previous to the Ameri- 
can Revolution, and settled in the above named Sta.te, where they were at 
one time slave-holders and tillers of the soil. In 1796 Mr. White, sen'r, 
died, and left a family of five children, of whom our subject was the eldest. 
His mother came to Canada in the same year, bringing with her a faithful 
slave called" Mammy Long," to whose care Isaac was especially entrusted. 
She died in Toronto at the age of one hundred years. \Vhen Mr. \Vhite 
was seven years of age he was sent to Bond Head, Simcoe County, where 
he was bound as an apprentice, and a few years later drove Thomas 
Rouche's stage between York and Niagara until 1810. His advantages of 
education, like the youth of that day, were very limited. He never attended 



Cz"ty of Toronto. 


17 1 


school but one day, and on that day fell into a dispute with his school-mate, 
Allan :McNab (afterwards Sir Allan :McNab), and gave him a severe 
thrashing; for fear of being chastised by his teacher he failed to return. 
This circumstance caused the two juvenile pugilists to become fast friends, 
and whenever, in after years, Sir Allan was in York he never failed to call 
upon his friend White. As Mr. \Vhite advanced in life he saw the benefits 
to be derived from an education, and from his meagre earnings purchased 
some school books; with industry and great perseverance he mastered the 
common English branches, which fitted him for a useful and eventful life. He 
served at the taking of Detroit and the Battle of Queenston Heights. He was 
present at the battle of York, where he was taken prisoner of war with the 
York Militia. vVhen brought before the American Commander, Major 
General Dearborn, his American accent was at once detected; Major- 
General Dearborn enquired, " What are you doing here, young man, fight- 
ing against your country?" Mr. \Vhite replied, "General, I will not deny 
my nationality, nor am I fighting against my country; if a country is worth 
living in it is worth fighting for; I am fighting for my home and my family 
who reside here." "That's right, my boy, you are a brave fellow," said 
the General, who immediately paroled him. After serving until the close 
of the war he received, in 1848, from the Crown for his bravery a silver 
medal. Previous to the war he married Nancy, eldest daughter of Jacob 
Snider, of Eglinton, York County, by whom he had one daughter. He 
subsequently kept the old Red Lion Hotel in Y orkville, and afterwards 
located at the corner of James and Albert Streets, where he lived many 
years. He early acquired the trade of mason and bricklayer, and was 
concerned in the erection of many fine and substantial buildings in the city, 
among which were St. James's Cathedral, and Osgoode Hall. The first 
fire company that was organized in York counted him among its members. 
At the time of his death, 1878, he was one of the oldest members of the 
York Pioneers, being eighty-six years of age. He earned for himself a 
reputation, second to none, for intelligence, honesty and an undivided 
application to business. His second marriage was in 1838, to Jane, the 
widow of Thomas Carroll, and a daughter of the late John McIntosh, by 
whom there was no issue. 


JAMES WICKSON, deceased, was born at Walworth, near London, Eng- 
land, in 1794, and in 1834 emigrated to Canada, and settled in Toronto. 
He engaged in the butcher business, and occupied a store in the Market, 
which he carried on until a little previous to his death. He married Miss 
Jane Tuesman, by whom he had ten children, eight of whom are still living, 
and three of them residing in this city. John \i\Tickson, the second son, was 



17 2 


Biographical Notices. 


born in England in 1817, and came to Canada with his father. He also 
engaged in butchering, and had a stall in the Market until 1870, after 
"\vhich he became interested in real estate. In 1836 Mr. \Vickson married 
Miss Eliza Chilver, daughter of Joseph Chilver, who emigrated to this 
country in 1833. He had eleven children, nine of whom are still living. 
HON. CHRISTOPHER \VIDMER. (From the vVeekly Globt, May 5, 18 5 8 .) 
The venerable gentleman whose name heads this paragraph died on 
Monday morning at four o'clock. On Sunday at noon he had gone to visit 
the grave of an only son, recently deceased, to whom he was deeply 
attached, when he was.seized with a fit, was conveyed home, and notwith- 
standing all the efforts of the medical men, expired on the following 
morning. Dr. \Vidner was a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, 
and was formerly Staff Surgeon attached to the Fourteenth Light Dragoons. 
He served through nearly the whole of the Peninsular vVar, for which he 
held the medal with five clasps for Vittoria, Salamanca, Fuentes d'Onoro, 
Busaco and Talavera. . He came to this country before the close of the 
American \Var, and resid
d in Toronto until his death; he was consequently 
one of the oldest inhabitants of the city. In 1849 Dr. \Vidmer was 
appointed a member of the Legislative Council. For many years he 
occupied the first rank in his profession in Toronto, being constantly in 
every important and critical case, and was highly valued for his courage, 
promptitude and skill. He was at times somewhat rough, retaining a little 
the manner of the army, but he was essentially kind-hearted, and many 
grieved for the loss of their frank and reliable medical adviser. In his long 
and successful practice he accumulated a large fortune. He left two 
daughters, one unmarried, the other the wife of George M. Hawke, Esq. 
He was within a few days of the seventy-eighth year of his age. 
JOHN \VIGHTMAN, retired, was born in Brampton, Cumberland, England, 
in 1806. His parents were Robert and Mary (Davidson) \Vightman; his 
mother died in England in 1818. In 1834 he came to Canada with his 
father, who was a manufacturer of worsted goods. His father died in 
Toronto in 1860. After he came out here John \Vightman and his brother 
George opened a dry goods store and straw bonnet manufactory on King 
Street, near Y onge; at the end of three months they removed to where 
Catto's store now is, on King Street, which they held until 1874, when they 
sold the business to Mr. Catto; they were in business there for sixteen 
years. Mr. \Vightman is now retired from business. In 1838 he married 
a daughter of Captain J ago, from .Plymouth, England, by whom he had one 
son, who is now living at Deer Park; she died in 1849. In 1850 he married 
Elizabeth Hayward, who was born in Hampshire, England, in 1802; she 



City of Toronto. 


173 


died in 1877. Mr. Wightman had no children by his second marriage. He 
is a reformer in politics, and a Congregationalist in religion; he is a deacon 
in his church. Mr. vVightman had three sisters, the eldest Mrs. Burns, who 
died in Yorkville, 1846; the second, Margaret \Vightman, who' died in 
Toronto, 1875; and the youngest, Mrs. Evans, who died in Cobourg, 1869. 


ROBERT \VILKES, deceased. In the records of Toronto many names 
occur to a long resident which fail not, when recalled, to stir some cherished 
memory of departed years. The subject of our present brief memoir is one 
of those, and consequently deserving of more than ordinary notice. Of 
Irish birth, he displayed all those qualities-ability, energy and quicksight- 
edness, traits of character common among his countrymen-which assist 
materially that success which is generally their lot when free from the 
political evils that do so much to retard progress on their native soil. 
Robert \Vilkes was born in Tulleham, County Leitrim, Ireland. June 2+. 
1832. He came to Toronto with his mother in 1848, and was one of a 
family of seven children, his father having died in Ireland. On the settle- 
ment of the family here, Robert was immediately placed in the mercantile 
house of his maternal uncle, Mr. R. H. Brett. In 1852 he engaged as clerk 
with Rossin Bros., Jewellers, with whom he remained until their retirement 
from business in 1858. Mr. \Vilkes then commenced business on his own 
account and, four years later, secured premises on Yonge Street, Nos. 48 and 
50. Encouraged by his success in ToroDto, he opened a branch house in 
Montreal. From this time forward his success was assured, and the 
honours afterwards falling to his lot were not less earned than deserved. 
In the year 1871 he became Director of the Bank of Commerce, and two 
years later he was elected a member of the Dominion Parliament, as repre- 
sentative of Central Toronto. In religious matters l\Ir. \Vilkes was an 
example, his own body (the Methodists) having during his lifetime received 
from him material assistance. He was a Trustee of Bloor Street Methodist 
Church, and was instrumental in procuring the extensive alterations and 
improvements recently made in that edifice. He was for many years 
Treasurer of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society, and was also a 
member of the Board of Trade. Mr. \\,Tilkes lost his life in a noble and 
praiseworthy endeavour to save his 
on and daughter from death by drown- 
ing off Sturgeon Point and, ere assistance could be rendered, he and those 
he attempted to rescue found a watery grave. Thus perished one of those 
citizens whose name is connected with the rise and progress of the city; 
enterprising, honourable and courageous, his life is a guidance to the rising 
generation, and his success exemplifies what may be the result of a laudable 



174 


Biographical Notices. 


and unselfish ambition. Mr. Wilkes married on July 23, 1863, Martha, 
daughter of Dr. Cooke, of London, England. 
\VILLIAM \VILKINS was born in County Cork, Ireland. In 1834 he came 
to Canada, and locating in Toronto, opened a store, and engaged in the 
mercantile business. He first commenced on King Street, but shortly 
afterwards removed to where the house of Gooderham now stands. He 
remained here twenty years, and then returned to King Street, and after 
spending two years in the latter thoroughfare he retired from the business. 
He has since been largely engaged in the erection of houses and, in con- 
nection with his son, has built over one hundred houses in the eastern 
portion of the city. He married, in 1840, Miss Margaret May, of Queen's 
County, Ireland, by whom he had nine children, six of whom are yet living, 
four sons and two daughters. 
JAMES M. WILLIAMS, Gas Company Lamp Inspector, is a native of 
Sittingbourne, Kent, England, and is the youngest son of Captain William 
\Villiams, of the Mediterranean Steamship Line, who married Miss 
Matilda Love, also of Sittingbourne. Mr. Williams came to Toronto in 
1869, and in 1882 took his present position. In 1867 he married Elizabeth 
M. Etall, of Dover, Kent, England. 
JAMES A. WILLIAMSON, barrister, 18 St. Mary's Street, is a native of 
Galt, Ontario, the eldest son of Robert \Villiamson, merchant, born in 
Ross-shire, Scotland, who married Jessie Bethune, of the same county, and 
came to Canada about 1864. Mr. Williamson received his primary educa- 
tion at the Central School, Galt, and afterwards under Dr. Isaac. He was 
articled to \V. H. Beatty, and in 1879 passed his final examination, and 
was called to the Bar. 
THOMAS P. \VORTHY, Yorkville, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 
1810. He came to York in 1831, and having no trade he went out on to 
the Huron track and worked three years at farming. He then returned to 
Toronto, and on August 4-, 1834, married Ann Scaling, the wedding being 
solemnized in Upper Canada College. After this event he was engaged in 
the making of soda water and ginger beer, for thirty years. He was in the 
Rebellion of 1837. He is a Conservative in politics, and in religion a 
member of the English Church. His eldest son is employed with George 
Pearse, coffee and spice manufacturer, corner of Y onge and Maitland Streets. 
J. \V. \VONCH, general agent, 270 Parliament Street, Toronto, was 
born in Markham Township, August 10, 1837. His father was John 
R. \V onch, a native of Prussia, who, with his parents settled on lot 20, 
Concession 4, in Markham Township, on 1st January, 1794, the said 



Cz"ty of Toronto. 


175 


John R. Wonch then being only five years old. The mother of John 
W. Wonch was Ann Amelia Shoults, who, it is stated, was ,the first Euro- 
pean child born in Little York (now Toronto), she was born, October 20, 
1794. There were born to John and Anne W onch four sons and two 
daughters, who all liv
d to years of maturity, the subject of this sketch 
being the youngest. J. \V. \Vonch received a common and High School 
education. Having finished his studies he followed the vocation of a 
teacher for fourteen years. He then tried farming for two years, when he 
entered the employment of the Massey Manufacturing Company, with which 
Company he has been for over twelve years. He married Miss H. M. 
Verro, daughter of Augustus and Sophia (Reynolds) Verro, of Stouffville, 
October 22, 1854, by whom he has four daughters and one son. Mr. 
\Vonch has always been a staunch Reformer. 


GEORGE H. WRIGHT, M.D., M.A., M.B., was born in Brampton, Ontario, 
1838. He received his early education at Streetsville, removing afterwards 
to Victoria College, Cobourg, where he received B.A. in 1862, and M.A. 
in 1867; in the same year he graduated rat Toronto University, M.B., and 
at once commenced practice in this city, where he has since remained, and 
succeeded in establishing an excellent connection. He was Demonstrator 
of Anatomy in the Toronto School of Medicine for twelve sessions, and is 
at present Assistant Lecturer on Materia Medica and Therapeutics. He 
is a member of the staff of the Toronto General Hospital, and also the 
Hospital for Sick Children. He is a lecturer on the Practice of Medicine 
in the \Vomen's Medi.cal College, Visiting Physician to the Home of 
Incurables, was a member of the School Board for eight years, during two 
of which he filled the position of Chairman, and is at present a member of 
Toronto Free Library Committee. Dr. Wright married Miss N. Wrong, 
by whom he has one son, George N. B. In politics he is a Conservative. 




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[The following sketch was received too late for insertion in its proper order.] 
THE LATE PAUL KANE, Canadian artist. In the earlier numbers of the 
new series of the Canadian Journal, several papers on various Indian tribes 
of the North-\Vest, from the pen of Paul Kane, attracted considerable 
attention, as the results of travel and personal observation in the remote 
Hudson's Bay Territory and beyond the Rocky Mountains. Their author 
. had long been known in Canada as a self-taught artist of great promise, 
who had devoted himself to the study of the native Indian tribes of British 
North America; and the contributions to that journal were the first pub- 
lished results of explorations, the fruits of which were afterwards set forth 
in more comprehensive form in his" Wanderings of an Artist among the 
Indians of North America," published by Messrs. Longman &Co., of London, 
in 18 59. His father, Mr. Michael Kane, was originally in the British Army, 
and served latterly, we believe, in the small force which accompanied 
Lieutenant-Governor Simcoe when he removed to the selected site of the 
future capital of \Vestern Canada, in 1794. On his leaving the army, he 
settled in the newly-founded city, where his son was born in 1810. Toronto 
was then and long afterwards a very humble little backwoods settlement. 
The Indians, whose wigwams occupied the' cleared ground near the 
mouth of the Don when Colonel Bouchette made his first survey in 1793, 
long continued to haunt this favourite spot; while an Indian trail through 
the partially cleared pine forest to the old French fort and an
ther 
northward to Holland Landing were the precursors of the long lines of 
costly stores, hotels and public buildings which now extend for miles along 
King and Yonge Streets. In the midst of this conflict between the artless 
rudeness of savage life and the progressive energy of the Anglo-Saxon 
colonist young Paul grew up from boyhood, with few external influences 
calculated in the slightest degree to stimulate artistic tastes, or to direct 
his attention to the study of Indian manners and customs; for the Indian, 
as seen in his worst debasement, haunting the centres of new civilization, 
is little calculated to attract the eye of the artist or ethnical observer. 
Nevertheless, Mr. Kane remarks, in the preface to his "Travels," when 
referring to his resolution to devote himself to painting a series of studies 
of North American scenery and Indian life: " The subject was one in which 
I felt a deep interest in my boyhood. I had been accustomed to see hun- 
dreds of Indians about my native village, then Little York, muddy and 
dirty, just struggling into existence;now the City of Toronto, bursting forth 
in all its energy and commercial strength." The youth of the future artist 
and traveller was passed amid all the disadvantages pertaining to the 
infancy of the embryo city. What little education he had was mainly 



Biographical Notices. 


received at the District Grammar School. There also he obtained what- 
ever instruction he received in the art to which he was to devote his life 
from i\Ir. Drury, a clever but eccentric teacher of drawing. But his early 
manifestations of an artistic bias were regarded as the mere purposeless 
amusements of a boy; and his disinclination for the ordinary trading pur- 
suits, which alone promised profitable occupation in the young settlement, 
seemed to unappreciative seniors only a further proof of his distaste for the 
restraints of steady industry. The circumstances of the community were 
indeed too frequently inimical to the fostering of settled habits among its 
youth. Dr. Scadding has remarked, when describing the first years of the 
District Grammar School, that" during the time of the early settlements 
in this country, the sons of even the most respectable families were brought 
into contact with semi-barbarous characters. A sporting ramble through 
the woods, a fishing excursion on the waters, could not be undertaken 
without communication with Indians and Half-breeds, and bad specimens 
of the French voyageur. It was from such sources that a certain idea 
was derived, which, as we remember, was in great vogue among the more 
fractious of the lads at the school at York. The proposition circulated 
about, whenever anything went counter to their notions, always was to run 
away to the Nor'-\Vest. What that process really involved, or what the 
Nor' - West precisely was, were things vaguely realized. A sort of savage 
land of Cocaigne, a region of perfect freedom among the Indians, was 
imagined, and to reach it Lakes Huron and Superior were to be traversed." 
In this way young Kane's mind was early familiarized with the idea of that 
expedition across the continent, to ocean shores beyond the Rocky Moun- 
tains, of which he has left so many memorials by means of his facile pencil 
and pen. The first industrial pursuits of the boy appear to have been 
carried on in the employment of Mr. Conger, subsequently Sheriff of Peter- 
borough, but then engaged in the manufacture of - household furniture. In 
this occupation his latent talent found expression in the ornamentation of 
various pieces of furniture, till he began to be recognized as one whose 
artistic abilities deserved encouragement. But in his native village no 
works of art existed to furnish the slightest hint to the aspiring boy! and no 
teacher could be found to supply adequate instruction. He was thus a 
purely self-taught artist. . Some of his crude efforts at portraiture would 
probably have amused himself at a later date. But his early patrons were, 
fortunately, not too critical; and thus he was enabled to overcome the first 
difficulties of his artistic career, and to save a little money for making an 
independent start in life. His first scene of artistic labour after leaving 
Toronto was Cobourg, where portraits of Sheriff and Mrs. Conger, her 



City of T01
OlltO. 


sister, Mrs. Perry, Sheriff Ruttan, and others of his early patrons were 
executed. By this means he acquired sufficient funds to enable him to set 
off for the neighbouring States, there to try his fortune as a portrait 
painter, in the hope of accumulating the requisite means for the bold 
project he had already formed of visiting Europe and perfecting himself 
in his favourite art by studying the works of the great masters. A letter 
from his father, addressed to him at Detroit, in 1836, speaks of difficulties 
that" will probably prevent your Italian excursion." Thereafter he is 
found, at various dates between that and the year 1841, at Mobile, St. 
Louis, and other American cities, closing with New Orleans, whence he 
set sail, in June of the latter year, for Marseilles. Tbe f
llowing four 
years were spent by Paul Kane in some of the great cities of Europe, 
studying and copying the works of the Italian masters. Unfortunately, 
a journal which he kept during this period has perished; so that 
the details of his continental sojourn are no longer recoverable. But 
we trace him, by means of his passports and other evidence, at Paris, 
Genoa, Milan, Verona, Venice, Bologna, Florence, Rome and Naples. 
While in the latter city, he availed himself of an offered passage in a 
Levantine cru
er, and visited the coasts both of Asia and Africa. He 
joined a party of Syrian explorers, and was already on his way to Jerusa- 
lem, when they were deserted by their Arab guides, and, after being 
exposed to great danger, were compelled to return to the coast, and 
abandon the attempt. This failure to accomplish a visit to the most sacred 
sc
nes of the ancient historic world was always a subject of mortifying 
reflection to him. It was on his return from this unsuccessful pilgrimage 
that he landed on some part of the African shore; and so was able to say, 
on regaining his Canadian home, that he had been in every quarter of the 
globe. Mr. Kane brought back with him, as the fruits of his four years' 
professional tour, copies of famous pictures in the galleries of Venice, 
Florence and Rome. His mind had been enlarged by observation, and by 
intimate intercourse with artists trained in the best schools of Europe. A 
letter of introduction, given to him by an Irish artist, whose friendship he 
had acquired while in Rome, is addressed to the Right Rev. Dr. Purcell, 
Bishop of Cincinnati, in which the latter is urged by no means to miss the 
opportunity of seeing Mr. Kane's" admiraòle copy of Raffaelle's portrait of 
Pope Paul II." He also copied some of the most prized pictures in the 
Palazzo Pitti, at Florence; and on his return, brought with him well- 
executed paintings from RaffaeUe's Madonna in the Pitti Palace, and his 
portrait of Pope Julius II.; Leonardo da Vmci's and Rembrandt's fine 
portraits of themselves, in the Florentine gallery; Murillo's l\Iadonna,in 



Biograpllical Notices. 


the Orsini Palace at Rome, and other favourite artIstIc studies; along 
with a highly finished copy of Busato's portrait of Pope Gregory XVI. 
Stewart \Vatson, a well-known Scottish artist, appears to have been one of 
his special friends while in Italy. They returned together from Italy to . 
London, and there for a time shared the same lodgings and studio, " at 
Mr. Martin's, Russell Street." Another of his brother artists, and fellow- 
travellers while in Italy, Mr. Hope James Stewart, thus writes to him from 
Edinburgh: "After London, this place looks like a dead city, and reminds 
me much of the way you and I felt the quietness of Rome, after our trip to 
that noisy and favourÌte place, Naples." In 1844, Mr. Kane returned to 
Canada, with all the prestige of a skilled artist, who by his own unaided 
energy had overcome every obstacle, and achieved for himself opportunities 
of studying the works of the great masters in the most famous galleries of 
Europe. He was now to display the same indomitable energy and self- 
reliance in widely different scenes. In the preface to his" \Vanderings of 
an Artist among the Indians of North America," he remarks: "On my 
return to Canada from the continent of Europe, I determined to devote 
whatever talents and proficiency I possessed to the painting of a series of 
pictures illustrative of the North American Indians ande scenery." On 
applying to Sir George Simpson, the Governor of the Hudson's Bay Com- 
pany, and showing him studies of Indians he had already made, Sir George 
entered cordially into his plan; furnished him with letters of introduction 
to the chief factors of the Company's posts, and ordered him a passage in 
the brigade of canoes which was to start for Lake Superior in the spring of 
1846. But before his arrangements could be completed-including all the 
miscellaneous supplies required for an artistic tour through regions where 
it would be vain to seek for the most simple appliances of his art-the 
voyageurs had set out, and he only succeeded in joining them, after much 
toil and hardship, before the party reached the mountain pass, forty miles 
aQove the Hudson's Bay Fort on the Kaministiquia River, at the head of 
Lake Superior. Mr. Kane's romantic experiences and adventures during 
the next four years are detailed with graphic truthfulness in the volume 
published by him in 1859. He crossed the continent in canoe and on foot, 
made his way up the valley of the Saskatchewan, and over the vast prairies 
beyond it, stretching westward'to the Rocky Mountains. Crossing them, 
he navigated the Columbia River to Oregon, vi
ited and explored Puget's 
Sound, Vancouver's Island, and other regions of the then savage west: 
which, though now rapidly filling up with European settlers, are described 
by him as "those wild scenes, amongst which I strayed almost alone, and 
scarcely meeting a white man, or hearing the sound of my own language." 



City of Toronto. 


Everywhere his pencil was busily employed on portraits of chiefs, w
rriors, 
and medicine-men of the Indian tribes; and on hunting scenes, games, 
dances, and other characteristic native rites and customs. He pictured 
various of the Flathead Indians, of the Cowlitz, Chinook, Newatee, and 
other tribes; had opportunities of studying the Crees,. Blackfeet, Chimp- 
seyabs, Clalams and others, including even the Esquimaux; and was 
everywhere received among them with mingled respect and apprehension, 
as a great medicine-man, whose reproduction of their likenesses by his 
mysterious art was supposed to give him some strange power over them. 
Among the most striking of the Indian portraits executed by him, is one of 
Kea-keke-Sacowaw, head chief of the Crees, whom he met when travelling 
on the Saskatchewan, engaged in raising a war-party against the Black- 
feet. He had with him eleven decorated pipe-stems, ten of which were the 
pledges of as many chiefs engaged to join him in the proposed expedition. 
On learning that the artist was a great medicine-man, he agreed to exhibit 
to him the pipe-stems, in the belief that his sketching !hem would greatly 
increase their efficiency when opened on the war-path. A pipe-bowl was 
accordingly filled with tobacco and some aromatic weed; the chief chaunted 
a war-song; and then inserting one of the stems into the bowl, he lighted 
it, inhaled the smoke, and blew a long cloud upwards. This was his 
offering to the Great Spirit, whom he invoked to confer success on their 
expedition. Another prolonged puff, directed eastward, was followed 
by an appeal to the earth to produce an abundant supply of roots and 
buffalo for the coming season. The third was directed to Kafle himself, 
with a request for his influence on their behalf. He had then to smoke 
all the eleven pipes; and thus enlisted in the cause, the portrait he 
then painted of the grim old chief, adorned with his war-paint, and holding 
in his hand his own pipe-stem, decorated with the head and plumage of 
an eagle, was esteemed a great medicine, calculated to contribute materially 
to the success of the war-party. At length, after many wild adventures 
and hair-breadth escapes, Mr. Kane returned to Toronto in 1848 with a 
valuable portfolio of studies of Indians and scenery of the great North- 
West. \\Thile still at the Saskatchewan he received from Sir George 
Simpson a commission for a dozen paintings of "buffalo hunts, Indian 
camps, councils, feasts, conjuring matches, dances, warlike exhibitions, or 
any other pieces of savage life you may consider to be most attractive or 
interesting." Other commissions followed; and in 1851, by a vote of the 
Legislature of the Province of Canada, he was authorized to execute a 
series of Indian pictures which now hang in the Parliamentary library at 
Ottawa. But his most liberal patron was the Hon. G. "\iV. Allan, to whom 



Biographical Notices. 


he subsequently dedicated the narrative of his travels, "as a token of 
gratitude for the kind and generous interest he has always taken in the 
author's labours; as well as a sincerc expression of admiration of the 
liberality with which, as a native Canadian, he is ever ready to foster 
Canadian talent ånd enterprise." In 1853 Mr. Kane married Miss Harriet 
Clench, of Cobourg, a lady who, among other attractions, had a skill with 
her pencil and brush akin to his own. Thus happily domesticateci with a 
companion able to sympathize with him in his artistic labours, l\Ir. Kane 
devoted himself to the execution of an extensive series of oil paintings, 
including one hundred pictures of Indian scenes, landscapes, portraits and 
groups, now in the Hon. G. \!\T. Allan's collection at l\1oss Park. There 
also a very curious collection of Indian implements, weapons, masks, 
drums, carvings and other specimens of native art, obtained by l\Ir. Kane, 
during his travels in the North-\Vest, is now preserved. In 1857 he 
re-visited Europe, and superintended the execution of. the chromo-litho- 
graphic illustration.s of his travels. On his return to Toronto in the follow- 
ing year, he resumed his pencil, and indulged in the long cherished hope of 
being able to follow up that volume by a more extensive work, illustrative 
of the characteristics, habits and tribal peculiarities of the Indians of British 
North America, and the scenery of the regions they occupy. But soon after 
his return to Canada his eyesight began to fail, and he had scarcely completed 
the liberal commission of Mr. Allan, when he was compelled entirely to 
abandon the favourite art, which till then he had pur!:'ued with such energetic 
zeal in defiance of every impediment. Mr. Kane had, at least in his later years, 
somewhat of the quiet un impressible manner of the Indians, among whom 
he had spent some of the most eventful years of his life. A reviewer in the 
AthenæulIl, in noticing the published narrative of his travels, described him 
as "an American artist, who had studied in Europe, and apparently unites 
the refinement of the Old \!\Torld with the Indian energy of the New." His 
memory was singularly retentive; and, in spite of his reserved manner, his 
descripti ve Po\\ ers were great when he could be induced to give them 
free scope. In the company of those who did not sympathize with his 
favourite pursuits, his words were few and abrupt; but he was a man of 
acute observation, and, when questioned by an intelligent inquirer, abounded 
with curious information in reference to the native tribes among whom he 
had sojourned. His published narrative is a modest, but interesting and 
vivid description of novel scenes and incidents of travel; and his carcer is 
a creditable instance of the pursuits of a favourite art, by a self-taught 
artist, in spite of the most discouraging impediments to success. 



TOWNSHIP OF YORK 


CE..A..ST).. 


13 



TO\VNSH I P OF YORK (EAST). 


....

 
\ .".... -#' 
v - <: HOMAS \VINSLOW ANDERSON, retired, was born in the 
( tV' \'_ Township of York in 1809, being the son of Cornelius and 

 
 '

 Mary (Snider) Anderson. His father was born in Scotland, 
(. and came to America in 1754, when only two years old, in 
.. 'I'" ," '\ company with his mother and two brothers. In the year 177 6 
-i ....10.. he joined the British Army under Colonel Allen and served 
through the whole campaign of the Revolutionary \Var, in 
which service he remained until disbanded in New Brunswick. He then 
came to York County in 1804, accompanied by his wife and family, consist- 
ing of nine children. "He located on lot I I, concession I, York Township, 
where he resided until about 1835. During the \Var of 1812 he lost a horse 
which the Government had pressed into service, and it was not until some 
years afterwards that he received any compensation, and then only to the 
amount of $13. He died in 1848, aged ninety-six years, leaving a family 
of twelve children, six sons and six daughters. The subject of this sketch 
learned the watchmaking business with James McKenzie, with whom he 
served for four years. In 1832 he began business for himself, and continued 
it until 1854. In 1835 he married Jane Drummond, daughter of Colin 
Drummond, a native of Scotland and a member of the first corporation of 
York, by whom he had ten children. In 1869 he removed to a farm in the 
Township of York, where he now resides. Mr. Anderson is a Reformer in 
politics, and a Presbyterian in religion. 


\V. C. ALISON was born at Pickering, Ontario, and came to York 
County in 1880, having accepted the position of foreman in the saw-mill of 
Mr. J. H. Taylor, the working capacity of which is twelve thousand feet of 
lumber per day, and gives employment to fourteen hands. 



180 


Biographical Notices. 


JOSEPH ARMSTRONG, lot 3, concession 4, the eldest son of Edward 
Armstrong of this township, was born in 1837 on the old homestead, where 
he remained until 1868. He then settled on a farm which had previously 
been purchased by his father on lot 3. concession 4, containing sixty-two 
acres, which he has greatly improved and continues to cultivate. In 1861 
he married Miss Eliza Porter, of York Township, who died. in 1874, leaving 
six children. 


SAMUEL ARNOLD, proprietor of the brick works, Doncaster, is a native 
of Northamptonshire, England, and came to Canada in 1871. He learned 
his trade in England and afterwards worked about nine years in the English 
metropolis. On his arrival in Canada he worked for Pears, of Toronto, 
taking charge of the brick-machine. In 1877 he commenced to manufac- 
ture bricks on his own account near his present location. I-:Ie employs ten 
hands and turns out about eight hundred thousand bricks per annum. 


THE ASH BRIDGE FAMILY were originally" Penn Quakers" and emigrated 
from England before the \Var of Independence, and settled in Philadelphia. 
After the close of the war, the father being dead, the mother and two sons, 
John and Jonathan, came to Canada. This was in 1793, and on arriving 
at York they stayed the first night in the old French fort, subsequently 
making their way to what is now known as "Ashbridge's Bay." Being 
U .E. Loyalists they drew land from the Crown and settled on lot 8, con- 
cession I, broken front east of the Don. John and Jonathan participated 
in the \Var of 1812 and the Rebellion of 1837-8, and died on the homestead 
on the shore of the Bay. Isaac Ashbridge, farmer, is the son of Jonathan 
mentioned above, and was born at the bay, February 17, 1811. \Vhen 
eight years of age he attended school in the old Simcoe house east of the 
Don, the teacher being Mr. Stark. Isaac remained at home with his 
parents until he was thirty-two years of age, his father dying two years 
later, in 1845. He married, in 1
50, Ruth Auburn, a native of Northum- 
berland, England. Mr. Ashbridge has been in the York Township Council 
two years. He is a Reformer in politics and was commissioned a Justice 
of the Peace, but did not qualify. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church. Jesse Ashbridge, deceased, youngest brother of Isaac. was born 
on the old home farm in 1825. He married, in 1864, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Thomas Rooney. His death occurred in 18 74. 


MARK BARKER, deceased, was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1801, 
and in 1830 came to Canada and located in Little York, and engaged in 
farming. In 1834 he purchased one hundred acres on lot 5, concession 3, 



TO'lUllship of York ( East). 


181 


which he cleared and continued to cultivate until his death in 1869. He 
married Miss Ann Jaffrays, also from Lincolnshire, England, the result of 
this union being six children, four of whom are living and reside in the 
county. Mark, the eldest son living, was born on the old farm in 1843, 
where he has always remained, and which he is now in possession of. 


THOMAS BEATTY, retired, was born in New Brunswick in 1825, being 
the youngest in a family of five sons and two daughters, born to James and 
l\1argaret (Potter) Beatty. His father who was a farmer, came out to 
Canada in 1824; his mother was a native of Glasgow, Scotland. Both his 
parents returned to Ireland, where they died. Thomas Beatty came to 
Toronto in 1840, and worked on Jonathan Ashbridge's farm for ten years. 
He then kept the Commercial Hotel on Jarvis Street for four years, and 
the Prospect Hotel for fourteen years, after which he retired. In 1865 he 
married Ella Winnett, by whom he had two sons and three daughters. ]\tIr. 
Beatty is a generous and consistent member of the Methodist Church. 


J AMES BELL, deceased, was born in the County Fermanagh, Ireland, in 
1814, and at the age of twenty emigrated to Canada and settled in the 
Township of York. In 1833 he bought eighty acres of land on lots 23 and 
24, concession 4, east of Y onge Street, which he cleared, improved and 
remained on until his death in 1860. He married in 1843 Miss Martha 
Cherry, by whom he had four children. John, the only surviving son, was 
born on the old homestead, which is now known as Clydesdale Farm, 
where he has always remained, and now owns, having added since his 
father's death sixty acres on lot 25, concession 4; forty-five acres on lot 23, 
concession 3, and ninety acres in Markham Township, lot 16, concession 5; 
owning two hundred and seventy-five acres in all. In 1883 he married 
Miss Hannah l'vlorgan, daughter of John Morgan, of Scarboro'. 
JAMES BEST was born in Berkshire, England, in 1807, where he learned 
the trade of carpenter, which he worked at until coming to Canada in 1850, 
and which he has also followed since his settlement here. In 1852 he 
purchased five acres on the Kingston Road, which he has continued to 
cultivate up to the present time. In 1842 he married Miss Helen Mills, of 
Surrey, England, by whom he has five children. 


ROBERT BOND, deceased, was born in Suffolk, England, in 1778, where 
he remained until 1829. He then emigrated to Canada, and first located 
in the Township of East York. In 1826 he purchased one hundred acres 
of unenclosed land which he fenced and improved until his death in 1852' 



182 


Biographical Notices. 


:\Ir. Bond married Miss :Mary Palmer, a native of the same place, by whom 
he had six children. Thomas Bond was born in England in 1817, and 
came to Canada with his father, and has always remained on the old home- 
stead, which he now owns. In 1854 he married Miss Mary Manning, by 
whom he had four children, three of whom are living in the county. 


FRANK BOSTON was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1847, and came to 
Canada in the spring of 1869. He has been a resident of Ben Lamond since 
1871, and was first in the employment of the Toronto Gravel and Concrete 
Company as manager, in which capacity he superintended the construction 
of the tramway. In 1872 he married Miss Maggie Flynn, of Portland, 
l\Iaine, by whom he had four children. In 1877 he erected a store and 
boarding establishment on his present location, which was burned down in 
the beginning of 1884. He now does a large bakery trade. 


THOMAS BOTHAN was born in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, 
in 1809, and in 1836 emigrated to Canada, and first settled near Brampton. 
In 1874 he purchased fifty acres of land in McGillivray Township, Middle- 
sex County, and afterwards two hundred acres near Mimico Station, which 
eventually was bought by the Government. In 1872 he purchased his 
present property containing one hundred acres on lot 12, concession I, 
where he continues to reside. In 1833 he married Miss Eliza Stott, who is 
a native of Yorkshire, England, by whom he has five children, four of whom 
are living in this county. George, the youngest son was born in 1857, and 
lives on the old homestead with his father. In 1878 he married Miss 
Catharine Smith, daughter of William Smith, by whom he has one son. 


JOSEPH BRAUN, proprietor of the \Voodbine Hotel, his occupancy of 
which commenced with the beginning of 1884, came from England in 1883. 
The hotel is beautifully situated, and commands a fine view of Toronto and 
Lake Ontario, and comfortably accommodates upwards of thirty guests. A 
tram car passes every half hour, by means of which passengers may reach 
the city in twenty minutes. Mr. Braun is well acquainted with the hotel 
business, his wife having had charge of four refreshment rooms on the 
London and North-Western Railway, England. 
\VILLIAM H. BROTHERSTON is the only son of \Villiam Brother
ton, 
deceased, who was born in Scotland in 1813, and came to Canada in 1832. 
He settled in Toronto, and engaged in the trade of a blacksmith, his shop 
being located at the foot of Church Street, where he conducted one of the 
largest establishments of that kind in the city up to 1879. He married 



Township of York (East). 


18 3 


Miss Isabel Murray, of Caithness, Scotland, by whom he had four children, 
two sons and two daughters, of whom only three are living, one daughter 
having died. William H. was born in Toronto in 1848, and has always 
been a resident of the county. Having learned the trade of blacksmith 
from his father he opened a shop at Little York, where he carries on a 
general trade including carriage-making. In 1878 he married Miss Emily 
Newman, of St. Catharines, who died three years afterwards. His second 
wife was Miss Ellen McGill, daughter of vVilliam McGill, of Toronto 
Township. 


JAMES BROWN, deceased, was born in Cumberland, England, in 1801. 
In 1819 he enlisted in the 34th Light Infantry, which came to Canada in 
1834, and took part in the Rebellion three years later. In 1843 Mr. Brown 
received his discharge, and commenced working at his trade of tailor, 
which he followed until his death. His wife was Amelia Batchelor, to 
whom he was married in 1823, and who still survives him. James, the 
youngest son by the marriage, was born in 1846, on the old homestead in 
Eglinton, which he now owns, and where he still resides. Mr. Brown has 
held the office of County Constable since 1869. In 1874 he married Miss 
Lottie Ely, daughter of John Ely, of Ingersoll, by whom he has one son and 
one daughter. 


WILLIAM BRUNSKILL, proprietor of the Davisville Hotel, was born in 
York County, his father, John Brunskill, being a native of England who 
emigrated to Canada at an early day. He settled in Thornhill, and carried 
on the business of merchant, miller and farmer, to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1870. William followed his father's business of farmer, 
and in addition ran a line of busses from Eglinton to Toronto, he being 
the first to commence running on that route. In 1877 he leased and took 
possession of his present place of business, since purchasing the same, 
which in his hands loses nothing as a suitable suburban resort. 


THOMAS BURKE, deceased, was born in the County of Wexford, 
Ireland, in 1780. In 1817 he emigrated to Canada and first located in 
Perth, Lanark County, where he remained seven years, subsequently 
coming to York and settling on one hundred acres of land, which he had 
purchased, together with an additional one hundred acres given him by his 
father, on lots 3 and 5, concession 3, which he cleared and continued to 
cultivate until his death in 1841, About the year 1800 he married Miss 
Ann Wheelock, of County Wexford, Ireland, by whom he had six children, 
four of whom are living. John, the eldest son, was born in Wexford in 



18 4 


Bz'ographÙ:al Notices. 


1811, and came to this country with his parents, since which time he has 
been a resident of York, and owns one hundred acres on lot 2, and one 
hundred acres on lot 3, concession 2. 


HENRY CALANDER, the subject of this sketch, was born in Scarboro' 
Township, and has always been a resident of the county. He has been 
proprietor of the Calander Hotel, Leslieville, for twelve years, previous to 
which he was engaged in farming at Scarboro'. Mr. Calander is the son 
of the late John Calander, who came to Canada in 1812. In 1862 he married 
Miss Jane vVeaymouth, of \Villmouth, by whom he has seven children. 
His hotel property has a frontage of one hundred and fifty feet by five 
hundred feet, and has accommodation for forty guests, and has one of the 
best stables on the Kingston Road. 


GEORGE COOPER, deceased, was born in England in 1841. In 1846 he 
came to Canada, and in 1861 began gardening, purchasing seven acres on 
Pape's Avenue, where he remained until his death in 1878, since which time 
his business has been carried on by his widow. In 1861 he married Miss 
Catharine Manus, by whom he had seven children. 


RICHARD C. COSBURN is a native of London, England, where he was 
born in 1834. In 1857 he emigrated to Canada, and first located on King- 
ston Road, York Township, where he followed the trade of carpenter, also 
gardener. In 1872 he purchased twelve acres on lot 8, concession 2, which 
he has very much improved, and at the present time does a considerable 
trade in market gardening, and growing small fruits. He married in 1857 
Miss Louisa Palmer. 


GEORGE COULSON is the third son of John Coulson, an old resident of 
this township, and was born on the old homestead in 1850, where he 
remained until 1878, afterwards settling on lot 3, concession 3, his farm 
consisting of one hundred acres. In 1878 he married Elizabeth, daughter 
of Jesse Henry, of Scarboro', by whom he has two daughters and one son. 


GEORGE CUDMORE, deceased, was born in Devonshire, England, in 
1806, and in 1842 emigrated to Canada and took up his residence in the 
Township of East York, where he remained until his death in 1883. Soon 
after his arrival he commenced gardening in a small way, subsequently 
buying a farm on lot II, concession 3, where he carried on that business 
until his death. In 1835 he married Miss Eleanor Rudd, of England, by 
whom he had twelve children, three of whom are living. John Cu<!.more, the 



TOWll,ship of York (East). 


18 5 


second son, was born in England in 1839, and came to Canada with his 
parents. In 1860 he purchased a farm on lot 15, concession 2, on which he 
has carried on a successful gardening busines
, cultivating upwards of forty 
acres in vegetables, etc. In 1860 Mr. Cudmore married Miss Elizabeth 
Brown, daughter of John Brown, of York Township, by whom he had seven 
children, six of whom are living. 


GEORGE DIGBY, harness manufacturer and proprietor of the Coleman 
Hotel, Little York. Mr. Digby has been engaged in the manufacture of 
harness in York County for the last twenty years. He was born in Dublin, 
Ireland, and came to Canada in 1852 and located in Toronto, subsequently 
removing to Markham, where he stayed fifteen years. He again returned 
to the city and, after a prolonged residence there, came to his present loca- 
tion in 1884. In 1868 he married Miss Mary Jane Wilson, by whom he 
has five children. 


JOHN DOEL, deceased, was born in Wiltshire, England; in 1790, where 
he remained until 1817. He then determined to seek his fortune in the 
New World, and accordingly sailed for Philadelphia, U.S., in which city he 
remained about one year. He then decided to come to Canada, a journey 
which took him above a month, landing in Little York, November 5, 1818. 
Soon after his arrival here he engaged in the brewing business on Sher- 
bourne Street, then known as Caroline Street; subsequently conducting his 
trade on Adelaide and Bay Streets until the burning of his brewery in 
1847, when he retired into private life; his death occurred in 1871, his wife 
following him a year later. From 1825 to 1830 Mr. Doe! was the only 
letter carrier in Little York. He was a Justice of the Peace for many 
years. In 1815 he married Miss Huntly, of Wiltshire, England, by whom 
he had six children four of whom are still living, viz., the Rev. John Doel, 
of Y orkville; Hester Ann, the widow of the late John W. Drummond, J.P. 
Elizabeth, widow of the late Rev. William Price, and William Henry. In 
religion Mr. Doel was an active and prominent member of the \Vesleyan 
Methodist Church. In politics he was a Reformer, and during the troubles 
of 1837 suffered with many others for his political principles, he having 
been twice imprisoned during that memorable winter. William Henry 
Doel was born in Little York in 1827, being the second son of the above. 
He was educated at Upper Canada College, and served his apprenticeship 
as an apothecary under Francis Richardson, after which he carried on the 
drug business both in Toronto and Whitby. On the commencement of the 
Civil \Var in the States Mr. Doel entered the service of the United States 



186 


Biographical Notices. 


Government in connection with the l\Iedical Department, and continued 
until the close of the war, then taking up his residence in Philadelphia, 
where he remained until 1870. He returned to Toronto and resided in the 
city two years, afterwards removing to his present residence on Broadview 
Avenue. In 1852 Mr. Doel married Miss Jane Huntly, of Philadelphia, by 
whom he has three children living. Mr. Doe! has filled various public 
positions, having been a License Commissioner for East York a number of 
years. He was President of the Reform Association for his district, and 
has been a Justice of the Peace since 1877. He was one of the promoters 
of the Industrial Exhibition Association of Toronto, of which society he 
has been an active director since its inception. 


DOUGHTY BROS., proprietors of brick-yard, Doncaster. This firm is 
composed of 1. H. and R. A. Doughty, natives of Toronto and sons of 
Richard Doughty, an Englishman by birth, who came to Canada at an 
early day. During his lifetime he carried on the business of builder and 
contractor. Previous to 1881 the brothers were engaged in a different 
business, 1. H. following his father's trade, and R. A. conducting a pork- 
packing business. The present business was established in 1881, and now 
employs about ten men, and the annual output is from seven hundred 
thousand to one million machine stock. They use a Fowmley machine. 


JOHN DOUGLAS, deceased, was born in Ireland in 1804 and came to 
Canada in 1831, and settled in Toronto, where he resided up to the time of 
his death in 1869. He had six children, four of whom are living. William, 
the eldest son, was born on York Street, Toronto, in 1834, and remained in 
the city up to 1855. He then moved to Eglinton and engaged in the car
 
riage business, which he still continues to carryon. In 1855 he married 
Miss Eliza Gillespie, of Y orkville, by whom he has four children. 


DAVID DUNCAN is the third son of \Vm. Duncan, and was born on the 
old homestead in 1837. In 1864 he settled on a farm which had been pre- 
viously purchased by his father, being lot I I, concession 3, where he 
owns two hundred and fifty acres. In 1873 he married Miss Anne Laird, 
daughter of Hugh and Ellen Laird, by whom he has two sons and one 
daughter. 
HENRY DUNCAN, Reeve of the Township of York, is the eldest son of 
\Villiam Duncan. He was born on the old homestead in 1833, where he 
remained until twenty-seven years of age, afterwards settling on a farm 
previously purchased by his father, containing two hundred acres, being 



Township of York (East). 


18 7 


lot 10, concession 3, which he has very much improved and still resides on. 
In 1861 Mr. Duncan married Miss Betsy J. McGinn, daughter of Charles 
McGinn, who came to the Township of York in 1812. Mr. Duncan's 
family consists of six children. He has always taken a deep interest in the 
affairs of the township and was elected to the Council in 1870, and from 
1871 to 1878 was Deputy-Reeve, and in 1879 was elected Reeve, being in 
the Township Council fourteen years. 


JUSTUS DUNN is a native of the State of New Jersey, where he was 
born in 1813. In 1862 he came to Toronto and first engaged in the whole- 
sale fruit trade, being one of the first engaged in that industry, which he 
carried on for nine years. He purchased twelve acres on Queen Street 
East extension, where he engaged largely in the growth of small fruits. In 
1836 Mr. Dunn married Miss Barbara Ann Mackie, of Niagara County, 
New York State, by whom he had seven children, three of whom are living 
in Canada. Mr. Dunn is now cultivating six acres, growing small fruits. 


THOMAS ELGIE, deceased, was born in Durham, England, in 1816, and 
emigrated to Canada in 1841, taking up his abode in Toronto. He engaged 
in farming for about four months, after which he opened the celebrated 
Bay Horse Hotel, conducting the same for about seven years. He then 
gave up the hotel business and purchased about two hundred acres of land 
on lot 15, concession 2, which he improved and cultivated up to the time 
of his death in 1880. In 1842 he married Miss Elizabeth Cook, who died 
in 1848, taking for his second wife Miss Elizabeth Beckwith, daughter of 
George Beckwith, by whom he had ten children, only four of whom are 
living. 
G. EMPRINGHAM, of Little York, was born in England in 1837, where 
he remained until 1851, in which year he came to Canada with his father, 
\Vm. Empringham, and settled in the Township of York, where he was 
engaged in farming until 1881. Since that time he has been engaged in 
the hotel business. In 1862 he married Miss Mary Ormerod, of Scar- 
boroug h. 


DANIEL FITZGERALD, deceased, was born in Waterford, Ireland, in 
180 4. In 1825 he emigrated to New York State and settled in Cape Vin- 
cent, where he remained until 1843. He then came to Canada and settled 
in the Township of York, on lot 5, concession 2, having purchased one 
hundred acres of land, on which he lived until his death in 1844. His wife 
was Rebecca Noble, a native of New York State, by whom he had four 



188 


Biographical Notz'ces. 


children. Joseph, the youngest, was born in New York State in 1839 and 
came to Toronto with his parents. In 1864 he went to Lambton County, 
where he stayed until 1871, and returning to York purchased the old home- 
stead, which he now owns. In 1861 he married Miss Catharine Gorman, 
by whom he has ten children. Lewis F., the eldest son of Daniel Fitz- 
gerald, was born in 1837 in the State of New York, and came to Canada 
with his father and lived on the old homestead. He purchased fifteen 
acres on lot 8, concession 2, to which he has since added ten acres, which 
is devoted to gardening and fruit growing. In 1856 he married Miss Ellen 
Daily, of York Township, by whom he has eight children. 


\VILLIAM GALLOW, deceased, was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in 
1807, and in 1857 emigrated to Canada, settling in Toronto, where he 
engaged in gardening, which industry he has continuously carried on. In 
1861 he purchased a farm on the Don and Danforth Road, which he cleared 
and cultivated, doing the largest gardening business in the district, until 
the time of his death, which occurred January 8, 1885. In 1833 he married 
Miss Grace Reid, by whom he had nine children, six of whom are living. 


ROBERT GOODINGS, proprietor of brick-yard, Doncaster, was born at 
Windermere, a village in the Lake District of England, being on the shores 
of a romantically situated lake from which the village takes its name. He 
came to Canada in 1873, and having previously learned brick-making he 
followed the same occupation on his arrival here. In 1870 he commenced 
on his own account at his present location, where he does an extensive 
trade, manufacturing between eight hundred thousand and one million 
bricks annually and employs from eight to ten workmen. 
ALEXANDER GRAY was born in Scotland in 1804 and came to Canada 
in 1820, locating with his brothers \Villiam and James on lot 19, concession 
3, where they erected a grist and saw-mills, the property now belonging to 
the subject of this sketch. Mr. Gray married, in 1835, Miss Marion 
:\lcLean, daughter of John McLean, of \Vellington County, who died 
during 1883, leaving a family of six children. James Gray, the only son of 
James, deceased ,brother of Alexander Gray, was born on the old homestead 
and now owns the west half of lot 9. 
THOMAS S. GRAY, the eldest son of Alexander Gray, was born on the 
old homestead in 1836. In 1863 he settled on lot 10, concession 2, where 
he has eighty-six acres. In 1873 he married Miss Mary N. Bonoby, by 
whom he has four children. 



TOW1lship of York (East). 


18 9 


WILLIAM GRAY was born in Renfrewshire, Scotland, in 1802, and in 
1823 emigrated to Canada, and in conjunction with his brother located on 
lot 9, concession 3, Township of York, erecting thereon a saw and grist- 
mill. Since 1854 Mr. Gray has had exclusive control of the grist-mill 
property, where he still carries on a good custom trade. In 1840 Mr. Gray 
married Miss Phæbe Street, a daughter of Timothy Street; she died in 
1878, leaving six sons and four daughters. 


R. GREENWOOD, fruit-grower, Kingston Road, is a native of England 
and came to Canada in 1874. He has now under cultivation some thirty 
acres of land devoted to the growth of strawberries, raspberries, apples, 
currants and other fruits, all of which find a ready sale in the Toronto 
market. 


HALLAT BROTHERS, glue and oil manufacturers, Doncaster. This firm 
consists of Vincent and J. S. Hallat, who are the sons of Joseph E. Hallat, 
a native of Cornwall, England, who emigrated to Canada in 1851, and was 
engaged in the wool business for many years. Messrs. Hallat Brothers 
built their extensive manufactory in 1879-80; the dimensions of the main 
building being 4-2 x 22 feet and four storeys high, with the annexes- 
one of two storeys, 36 x 16 feet; one of one storey, 72 x 14 feet; one of 
two storeys, 42 x 60 feet, and boiler-room, 30 x 12 feet, with an engine 
fifteen horse-power, the boilers having a capacity of fifty horse-power. 
The business turn-over is annually from fifty thousand to sixty thousand 
dollars. 


W. HARRIS & Co. This firm is composed of \Villiam and John B. 
Harris, who established their business in 1870 on Kingston Road, after- 
wards removing to Pape's Avenue, where they are now engaged in the 
manwfacture of sausage and bologna casings, fertilizers and fertilizer 
materials, animal oils, etc. They also do an extensive trade as stock 
dealers, handling horses, cattle, milch cows, hogs, etc. \Villiam Harris 
was born in England in 1848 and came to Canada in 1870. John B. was 
born in 1856 and came to Canada in 1872, and was engaged in business in 
London, Ontario, until 1882. 


WILLIAM HARRISON, deceased, was born in Nova Scotia in 1784, and 
came to Canada and settled in the County of York in 1797. He took up 
lots 12 and 13, concession 2, East York, consisting of three hundred 
acres, which he partially cleared before his death, in 1838. In 1813 he 
married Miss Elizabeth Wright, daughter of Archibald \Vright, of this 



19 0 


Biographical Notices. 


townshIp, by whom he had eleven children, seven of whom a.re yet living. 
In the \Var of 1812 Mr. Harrison took a prominent part, and received a 
medal for services rendered at Queenston Heights. \Villiam Harrison, the 
third son of the above, was born on the old homestead in 1820, where he 
has always remained; he now owns one hundred acres on lot 13, fifty acres 
on lot 12 and sixty on lot II. In 1848 he married Miss Susan Brooks, 
daughter of Edward Brooks, of Scarboro' Township, by whom he has four 
children. Christopher, the youngest son of \Villiam Harrison, deceased, 
was born on the old homestead in 1829, where he has continued to live and 
of which he now owns two hundred acres. In 1860 he married Miss Cath- 
arine, daughter of Thomas Shepherd, by whom he has six children. 


THOMAS HASTINGS, retired, was born in the Township of \Vhitchurch 
in 1808. His father, Nathaniel Hastings, came from Massachusetts in 
1796. He drew two hundred acres of land at Hogg's Hollow, but finally 
settled on Y onge Street, in vVhitchurch Township, on a farm of two 
hundred acres, where Thomas was born. He afterwards removed to lot 
10, concession I from the bay, Township of York, where he died in 1833, 
leaving a family of twelve children, of whom four are now living. He 
served in the War of 1812 and was taken prisoner at the capitulation of 
York. Thomas Hastings' mother was a Miss Webster, of English descent; 
she died in 1847. The subject of this sketch learned the trade of an axe- 
maker in Toronto, serving three years. He afterwards worked in Rochester, 
New York, for one year, at the end of which time he returned to Canada 
and engaged in business for himself at Cobourg. In 1832 he commenced 
farming in the Township of York. He next went to Orleans County, New 
York, where he engaged in farming for four years, and to Cleveland, where 
for six years he worked at his trade. In 1847 he returned to Canada and 
settled in the Township of York. In 1834 Mr. Hastings was married to 
Elizabeth, second daughter of John Becket. He has one son now living 
in Toronto and engaged in the brewing business. 


THOMAS HELLIWELL, deceased, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 
179 6 , and emigrated to Canada in 1818, first settling near i\iagara Falls, 
and coming to Toronto two years later. He engaged in the brewing and 
milling business on the Don at Todmorden, afterwards devoting his time to 
improving his property in that section. He died in 1862. Mr. HeUiwell 
married Miss Mary \Vilson, who died in 1832. He married a second time, 
his wife being Miss Ann Ashworth, of Lincolnshire, England. He had six 
children by his first wife, and seven by his second. \V. P. Helliwell, the 



TOWllship of York ( East). 


19 1 


youngest son of his first wife, was born in Toronto in 183 I, and has continued 
a resident of the county. In 1866 Mr. Helliwell removed to his present 
home on lot 12, concession 2, where he has been largely engaged in farming. 
In 1865 he married Miss Sophia Wood, by whom he has nine children. 


SAMUEL HILL, farmer, was born in the County of Wexford, Ireland, in 
181 5. His parents were John and Ann (\Vright) Hill. In 1840 having 
learned the trade of a tanner and currier, he came to Canada and located at 
St. David's, near Niagara, where he worked at his trade. In the following 
year he came to Toronto and worked at Smith's tannery; he afterwards 
carried on a tanning business for himself, finally giving it up to engage in 
farming on lot 2, concession I , York Township. He has also been largely 
interested in the ice business, having been proprietor of the Ontario Ice 
Company for several years. In 1850, he married a daughter of John Ash- 
bridge, who settled near the bay, which now bears his name, in 1794. In 
religion Mr. Hill is an active member of the Methodist Church; in politics 
he is a Conservative. 


JOHN HOGG, deceased, was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, in 1795, 
and in 1835 emigrated to Canada and located on lot 7, concession 3, East 
York, where he purchased fifty acres of bush land, subsequently adding fifty 
acres more, on which he lived until his death in 1879. In 1820 he married 
Miss Janet Hogg, of Scotland, by whom he had eleven children, six of whom 
are 
ti111iving. Robert, the youngest but one, was born on Y onge Street 
in 1835, and has always lived on the old homestead, half of which he now 
owns. In 1866 he married Miss 11argaret Thompson Young, daughter of 
J ames Young, by whom he has nine children. 


THOMAS HUMBERSTONE, sen'r, deceased, was the only child of Samuel 
Humberstone, an Englishman, who learned his trade, the manufacture of 
pottery, in Staffordshire, and came to America with his wife, and settled in 
the British Province of Pennsylvia, now called Pennsylvania, where their 
son, Thomas, was born in 1766, at Philadelphia. After the war by which 
the Americans gained their Independence they, with other U. E. Loyalists, 
left the United States and came to Montreal, where they resided for some 
time, having received a grant of one thousand acres of land for services 
rendered to the British during the American Revolution. Subsequently 
they removed to Swagorche, near Brockville, on the St. Lawrence, 
where the father carried on the manufacture of pottery, Thomas acquiring 
a knowledge of the trade. In 1798 he came to York, and located on lot 14, 



19 2 


Biograþhz"cal Notices. 


west of Y onge Street, taking up two hundred acres of land, which he cleared 
and fenced, erecting a pottery thereon, the first of its kind in York County. 
In r800 he married Miss Harrison, by whom he had ten children, one of 
whom met with a tragical death. The following IS an extract from the paper 
published at that time :-" Died,on Saturday, 22nd February, 1822, Elizabeth 
Humberstone, aged fifteen years, from the effects of a mortal wound received 
by using an old gun-barrel to turn the back-log in the house of her uncle, 
Francis Lee, at Talbot Settlement, in the Township of Oxford." It was an 
old gun-barrel found in the field, the wood having rotted away. For his 
services in the \Var of 1812, he drew a pension, a captain's half-pay, also 
five hundred acres of land in Tecumseth, when Sir Peregine Maitland, 
K.C.B., was Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada, and he also received 
a medal in memory of the capture of Detroit. He belonged to the Third 
Regiment of Incorporated Militia, and was taken prisoner of war by the 
Americans and sent to Greenbush, October II, r8I3, where he was let out 
on parole until exchanged after being kept as hostage. He served under 
General Brock, and when the latter fell mortally wounded at the Battle of 
Queenston Heights, he helped to carry him off the battle field, and the 
General's words to the others were" If I die, remember Humberstone, 
remember Humberstone." He was a Freemason, and helped to build the 
first Masonic Hall in Toronto.. Morgan and his wife boarded at his house 
when they first came to Canada. Some time after leaving there Morgan pub- 
lished an exposition of Freemasonry. Mr. Humberstone, sen'r, died in 1849, 
on lot 24, \Vest York, aged seventy-three years. Thomas Humberstone,j1.ln'r, 
the second son of the above, was born in I8II, on the old homestead, where 
he remained until 1833, following the same trade as his father and grand- 
father, subsequently carrying on a pottery at York Mills. He then returned 
to the northern part of the township and established a pottery, which, with 
the house and barn, was reduced to ashes by fire; he rebuilt, suffered from 
fire again, rebuilt a second time; moved to the other side of Y onge Street, 
and built again, which was also destroyed by fire, again he rebuilt and con- 
tinued in the business until he retired in favour of his second son, Simon 
Thomas, who now carries on the trade of his forefathers, having erected a 
large pottery on the site of the place where his father was first burnt out. 
There was no insurance whatever on any of the buildings that were 
destroyed by fire. After various properties passing through his hands, he 
moved to lot 8, East York, where he is now engaged in farming. On the 1St 
January, 1835, he was married by the Rev. Mr. Jenkins, Markham, to Miss 
Sarah \Vilson, second daughter of John Wilson, of Markham Township, 
formerly of Tyrone, Ireland, by whom he has eight children. Two of his 



Township of York ( East). 


193 


children are in the North-vVest, one died in the States, the other five are at 
present in York County. Last New Year's day, 1885, was the fiftieth 
anniversary of his wedded life. 


JAMES HUNTER, deceased, was born in Ireland, 1790, and in 1815 
emigrated to New York, where he stayed two years previous to taking up 
his residence in this city. He was a tailor by trade, and conducted a 
merchant tailoring establishment on Yonge Street up to 1835. He then 
purchased three hundred acres of land on lots II, 12 and 13, concession 3, 
and carried on a general lumbering business up to the time of his death, in 
1876. He married Miss Mary Nail, of England, who died in 1844, leaving 
a family of eight children, five of whom are still living. Alexander, the 
second son, was born in Toronto in 1824, and early learned the trade of a 
carpenter, and for many years carried on a building business in that city. 
He retired in 1865, and now lives on the old homestead. He married 
Margaret Elliott, of York, by whom he has three children. Edward was 
born on the old homestead in 1826, and carried on the lumbering business 
established by his father. 


ROBERT ARCHIBALD HUNTER was born in Scotland in 1833, and in 
1852 emigrated to the United States, remaining there two years, afterwards 
coming to Canada and locating in the Township of Scarboro', where he 
engaged in farming. In 1857 he purchased twenty-five acres on lot 2, 
concession 4, East York, to which he subsequently added another fifty 
acres, his farm being one of the finest in the township. In 1880 he bought 
one hundred acres in the Township of Scarboro', which" he still owns and 
which is attended to by his son. In 1855 he married Maria, daughter of 
Mark Parker, by whom he has eight children. 


JOSHUA INGHAM was born in Lancashire, England, in 1833, where he 
remained until 1862. He then emigrated to Canada and settled in Toronto, 
where he has since been a resident. He first opened a market on Y onge 
Street, which he continued for a short time, after which he engaged in 
buying and exporting largely both cattle and sheep. He was one of the 
well-known firm of Crawford & Company, cattle dealers, looking after the 
company's interests in England, and doing all the receiving and selling of 
stock. This firm exported over six hundred head of cattle monthly. In 
18 55 Mr. Ingham married Miss Harriet Axon, of Cheshire, England, by 
whom he had seven children. Mr. Ingham resides on the Don Mill Road, 
Chester Village. 
14 



194 


Biographical Notices. 


\VILLlAM 'JACKES, Eglinton, was born in little York in 1827. His 
parents (Franklin Jackes and Catharine Gibson) came from England in 182 4, 
and were married the following year. Franklin Jackes, who was a baker 
by trade, carried on his business in York until 1836, when he removed to 
Eglinton where he died in 1852, aged forty-eight years. His mother is still 
living and is seventy-seven years of age. Mr. Jackes, sen'r, was one of the 
Aldermen of Toronto, and after he removed to Eglinton became Reeve of 
York Township and \Varden of the county. He was commissioned a 
Justice of the Peace in 1837. \Villiam J ackes spent his early life in Toronto, 
and in 1835 went to Eglinton with his father. He now owns the farm, lot 2, 
concession I, which his father purchased. He was for some years a member 
of the Township Council, and is now Treasurer of the Township. In 1869 
he was commissioned a magistrate, He is also a member of the Agricul- 
tural Society. In politics he is a Reformer. Mr. Jackes was married in 
1857 to Henrietta, daughter of Robert Jones. 
HUGH LAIRD, deceased, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1803 and 
when eleven years of age came to Canada with his father. The latter 
settled in Halton County and Hugh, the subject of this sketch, came to 
York where he lived with Mr. Alexander Milne for some time. In 1835 he 
bought one hundred acres of land on lot 7, concession 2, which he cleared, 
fenced and continued to cultivate until his death in 1884. He married 
Miss Milne, daughter of Alexander Milne, his former employer, by whom 
he had six children. H ugh Laird; the only son, was born in 1844, and now 
has possession of the old homestead. 


T. LAMBERT is a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born in 1840, 
emigrating to Canada in 1872, and was first employed by Jacques & Hay, 
with whom he stayed three years. He then purchased five acres on lot 5, 
concession 2, where he erected a dwelling and hot houses, and has gone 
largely into market gardening and the growth of small fruits. In 1861 he 
married Miss 'Mary Farrar Boyes, by whom he has six children. 
ROBERT LAWRENCE was born in Gloucestershire, England
 in 1814, 
and in 1854 emigrated to Canada, and settled in the Township of York. In 
1868 he purchased his present home on lot 18, concession 3, where he is 
largely engaged in market-gardening. In 1844 he married Miss Mary Case 
Townsend, Gloucestershire, England, by whom he had twelve children, six 
of whom are living. 
JOHN LEA, the subject of this sketch, was the second son of John Lea, 
deceased, who came to Canada in 1818, and took up two hundred acres of 



 



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Township of York ( East). 


195 


land on lot 13, concession 3. He was born in 1823, and has always 
remained on the old homestead, of which he owns a part, owning one 
hundred and ten acres on lot 12 and fifty acres on lot 24, his farm contain- 
ing in all one hundred and eighty acres, devoted principally to farming, 
stock-raising and fruit-growing. In 1870 Mr. Lea married Miss Mary, 
daughter of James Charles, who was a long time engaged in the wholesale 
dry goods in Toronto; he has two sons and one daughter. 


\VILLIAM LEA, the subject of this sketch, was born in Lancashire, 
England, on the 28th of May, in the year 1814, and came to America with 
his father and mother in 1818. John Lea, his father, was born in Lanca- 
shire in 1773; Mary, his mother, was born in Cumberland. They sailed 
from Liverpool in the spring of 1818, in a barque commanded by one 
Captain Birkett, and after tossing about on the Atlantic three months 
arrived in Philadelphia, where they remained only a short time; then 
travelled in a stage coach over the Alleghany mountains to Pittsburg, 
where they remained a year. Not liking the country or people of the 
United States, the father went to Canada in search of a suitable place to 
settle in. \Villiam, with his mother, coming on to Niagara, travelled along 
the shore of Lake Erie, crossed the Niagara River at Black Rock and on 
past the Falls, the sound of which he remembered hearing. The first 
thing that gave his mother courage was seeing the British soldiers in their 
scarlet uniforms at Niagara, which was in 1819. When his father had 
found a place to his liking, in the Township of York, he informed his wife 
of his purchase of lot 13, concession 3 from the bay. She, with her son, 
crossed Lake Ontario in a schooner belonging to one Garside (the only 
steamboat at that time being the Frontenac), and on arriving at York they 
went to the farm, which consisted of a small log-house and a few acres 
cleared, the rest of the two hundred acre lot being heavily timbered. In 
the course of time they bought cows and kept a dairy, and planted an 
orchard. In 1829 his father built a brick-house, the only one then in the 
township, in which his brother, John Lea, now lives. John Lea, sen'r, 
died December, 1854, aged eighty-one years. He left his son \Villiam ninety 
acres of the old homestead, and John one hundred and ten, including the 
house, orchard and all the out-buildings. William, in 1841, purchased 
part of lot 12, concession 3 from the bay, containing one hundred and 
thirty acres, on which he and his family reside. In 1841 he married Mary 
Ann, second daughter of James Taylor, from Tadington, Derbyshire, Eng- 
land, by whom he had two daughters, both dying in infancy. Their mother 
soon followed, dying within three years of her marriage. In 1848 he mar- 



196 


Biof{raphical Notices. 


ried Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of Charles Kendrick Davids, a gentle- 
man from Dartford, Kent, England, by whom he had three sons and four 
daughters, who are all living; their mother died in 1867. In 1870 he 
married his present wife, Sophia, relict of John Samuel Blogg, of Canter- 
bury, England, and fourth daughter of Charles Kendrick Davids, of Dart- 
ford, Kent, England, now deceased. He, with two of his sons, carries on 
farming, fruit-growing and farm gardening. In 1850 he was elected to the 
office of Township Councillor in the place of John Eastwood, who died 
during the latter part of that year. He held the office for seven successive 
years thereafter. During the administration of Government by Lord Elgin 
he was appointed a Justice of the Peace, which position he still holds, 
having been reappointed as each commission was issued. He also wrote 
(being a member of the York Pioneers Society) a history of the early settle- 
ment of the River Don, with the business and milling industries carried on 
up to the present time, extracts from which appear in the first volume of 
this work. . 


GEORGE LESLIE, of Leslieville. William Leslie, the father of our 
subject, was of Scottish origin, his birth-place and that of his family being 
in the Parish of Roquart, Sutherlandshire, Scotland. He was reared upon 
a farm, and when a young man joined the Rothshire Militia, and served in 
the County of Tyrone, Ireland, where he married Catharine, eldest daughter 
of James Beatty, and sister of the Rev. John Beatty, of Cobourg. After his 
regiment was disbanded he returned home and engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until October, 1826, when he emigrated to Canada with a family 
of eight children, and joined the Rev. John Beatty at Streetsville. He 
settled upon two hundred acres, lot 14, concession 12, of York Town- 
ship, a portion of which he cleared and improved. In 1837 he com- 
manded a company of York Militia, and served during the campaign. Many 
years later he drew a pension from the Crown for his services in Ireland. 
He died in 1877 at Streetsville, leaving a family of eight children. He 
was a strong Conservative in politics. George Leslie, of Leslieville, 
was the second son in his father's family. He was born in Sutherland- 
shire in 1804, and was twenty-one years of age when he left home and 
came to York, where he entered the service of the late Hon. George 
Crookshanks, Commissary General. He remained with him one season, and 
then for several years acted in the capacity of gardener and florist to the 
Hon. \Villiam Allen, and the Hon. John Henry Dunne, Receiver General. 
In 1830 he purchased from the Rev. James Beatty, at Streetsville, the old 
homestead previously occupied by his father, a portion of which he cleared 



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Township of York ( East). 


197 


and improved. In 1837 he removed to Toronto, and took up his residence 
in an old frame house on King Street East, it being the place where he and 
Caroline, eldest daughter of Calvin Davis, passed the first nine years of 
their wedded life, which began in 1836. He soon after established him- 
self in business as a grocer and seed merchant. His first stock of seeds 
was brought from London, England. Seven years later he transferred his 
business to the corner of Y onge and Colborne Streets, upon the present 
site of the Bank of Commerce, _where he remained until 1845, when the city 
purchased the property for $5,000. He then leased from Mr. Charles Small 
twenty acres of land east of the Don, for a period of twenty-one years; he 
purchased the land two years later, and, by subsequent purchases, added 
to it until he now has two hundred acres in a good state of cultivation. 
Upon this land he began business as a nurseryman, florist, and gardener. 
The business has increased rapidly until his nursery is now the largest in 
the Dominion. A portion of his land was surveyed into lots and sold to 
settlers, thus forming the nucleus of a village. In 1851 he was commissioned 
Post-master of Leslieville Post-office, which office he still holds. Two 
years later he was commissioned a magistrate by the Hon. Robert Baldwin, 
the duties of which office he has ever since discharged with fidelity. \\Then 
the first fire company was formed in York he became a member. Our sub- 
ject is at the present time one of the oldest horticulturists in the Dominion, 
and has been an active member of the Agricultural Society for many years. 
Although a strong Reformer, he has never neglected his business to engage 
in political strife. He has two sons and two daughters. His eldest 
daughter, Caroline, married the eldest son of the Rev. Dr. Jennings, now in 
charge of the Bank of Commerce at Paris. His second daughter, Esther, 
married Alexander McDonald Allan, son of the Rev. Mr. Allan, of Goderich, 
who formerly published the Sigl1al at that place. The eldest son, George, 
is in partnership with his father in the nursery business, and also a magis- 
trate and Commissioner for taking Affidavits. He has been Reeve for the 
Township of York for five years, and represented St. Lawrence Ward in 
the City Council for two years. John Knox, the second son, is Clerk of the 
Township of York, and resides at Eglinton. 



 


JAMES LESSLlE. The events embodied in that portion of Canadian 
history which occupied the period immediately preceding, and that which 
followed, the Rebellion of 1837-8 had the effect of bringing many men into 
publicity who, but for the extreme display of faction which those events 
created, would most likely have desired to keep aloof from public affairs. 
To this class of men the subject of this brief memoir belonged, and having 



19 8 


Biographical Notices. 


in early life formed an intimate acquaintance with the leader of that 
Rebellion, it would be strange indeed if he had failed to imbibe some of the 
strong political principles that lay then undeveloped in the mind of \Villiam 
Lyon Mackenzie. James Lesslie was born at Dundee, Scotland, in 1802, 
being the son of Edward and Grace (Watson) Lesslie. His father was a 
bookseller and stationer, and being what is known as well
provisioned in 
life gave his family a good education, of which, as results proved, James 
took no small advantage. In the year 1820 Mr. Lesslie, sen'r, decided on 
emigration, and chartered a vessel which was to convey himself and large 
family, numbering twelve souls in all, together with household effects and 
his goods, to the N ew World. Owing to the illness of the mother, however, 
they were detained some months; but, in the meantime, the second eldest 
son, John, in company with William Lyon Mackenzie-who had previously 
been in the employ of Mr. Lesslie, sen'r, as book-keeper-sailed for Canada, 
and by the time the remainder of the family arrived, he was already engaged 
in business in York, now Toronto. After a prolonged voyage of seventy 
days James, with a younger brother and sister, arrived at Kingston, where 
he remained. The rest of the family came out next year, going forward to 
York. Our subject commenced business in Kingston in the book and 
stationery line, which he conducted there for four years, removing from 
thence to York, John going to Dundas, where a branch of the business was 
opened. This was in 1826, and in 1833 the firm, Lesslie & Sons, purchased 
property near the locality of the Globe office, and thereon erected their 
business premises. The causes which contributed to the Rebellion were 
at this time shaping themselves, and thinking men admitted the approach 
of a great crisis. Mr. Lesslie's sympathies were undoubtedly with the 
Reformers, though no evidence is apparent that he gave any active assist- 
ance to the rebels; but this fact did not prevent him from being subjected 
to persecution by the parties in power during the week of the Rebellion. 
His premises were taken possession of by the Government, and he himself 
arrested and imprisoned, with his brother \Villiam. They were released 
after an incarceration of a fortnight and enabled to return to their business. 
A few weeks after William, going on business by stage to Montreal
 was 
again arrested and imprisoned in Kingston Jail without any charge against 
him and treated as a criminal for about ten days. About the period of the 
arrival of Lord Durham as Governor-General, the publication of the Exam- 
bzer commenced by Sir Francis Hincks, which afterwards came into the 
hands of Mr. Lesslie in 1844, and was conducted by him for ten years, 
until the settlement of the question of the Clergy Reserves. He was also 
connected with the Peoples' Bank-the first Bank on the Scotch principle 



Township of York (East). 


199 


in Upper Canada-and for five years held the position of President. He 
was commissioned a Justice of the Peace, an:! was an Alderman of the first 
City Council. In 1858 he retired from business, and took up his residence at 
his rural retreat in Eglinton, and now, in his eighty-second year, he devotes 
his well-earned leisure to books and the management of a small farm. 


J AMES LONG, deceased, was born in the County Armagh, Ireland, in 
1809, and when ten years of age came to Canada with his father. Some 
years later he bought land on lot 19, concession 4, which he improved and 
cultivated until his death in 1871. A few years before his death he added 
one hundred and twenty-five acres on lots 18 and 20, concession 4. He 
married Miss Harriet Hough, by whom he had eight children. George 
H., the youngest son, was born on the homestead in 1840, which he now 
owns. He married in 1875 Miss Hannah Haron, daughter of Robert 
Haron, of Scarboro', by whom he has six children. 


JOHN McLATCHIE was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1848. In 1858 
he went to Ireland, and remained some years, then emigrated to Canada, 
and first located in the Township of Scarboro', where he worked at his 
trade of blacksmith for two years. He afterwards came to Toronto where 
he has resided ever since. In 1879 he purchased his present property in 
Leslieville where he carries on a large carriage-making and blacksmith busi- 
ness, his buildings occupying sixty-five feet by five hundred feet in depth. 


THOMAS MERCER, deceased, was born in County Down, Ireland, in 
1744, and came to the United States at an early day. He settled Ìn Phila- 
delphia, where he remained until 1793, and then coming to Canada, he, in 
1796, took up two hundred acres of land on lot 10, concession I, East York. 
The journey from Philadelphia was made overland, Mr. Mercer bringing 
with him a cow from his old settlement. He remained on his farm in York 
until his death in 1829. He married Susan Jordan, of Hillsborough, County 
Down, Ireland, the union resulting in seven children. Thomas, his second 
son, was born in Philadelphia in 1792, and came with his parents to Canada, 
always remaining on the old farm, which he cleared and considerably 
improved. He died in 1873. His wife was Catharine, daughter of John 
O'Reilly, of Drummondsville, near Niagara, who died in 1868, leaving five 
children. Thomas Hamilton, the eldest son, was born on the old home- 
stead in 1822, where he has always resided, and which he now owns, and 
to which he has since added fifty acres. In 1863 he married Jane, daughter 
of Vvilliam Graham, who came from Nova Scotia to Ontario in 1853' They 
had six children, five of whom are now living, viz.: Minnie A., .Ada S., 
Alfred E. E., Bertha E. M., \Vilfred H. O. 



200 


Biographical Notices. 


JOHN MILLS was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1825, and emigrated 
to Canada in 1848. He first settled in Thornhill, where he remained two 
years, subsequently removing to Toronto, and, taking charge of the Clyde 
Hotel, conducted that establishment from 1856 to 1878. After giving up 
the hotel business, he went to his farm known as the Clyde Cottage, on the 
Don and Danforth Road, where he cultivated one hundred acres of land. 
In 1854 he married Mrs. Arnitt, a widow, who died four years later. He 
married again, his second wife being Priscilla, daughter of George Lambert, 
by whom he had eleven children, nine still living. 


ALEXANDER MILNE, deceased, was born in Forfarshire, Scotland, in 
1777, and on emigrating to the United States in 1801 settled at Oyster Bay, 
Long Island, where he followed weaving, having at one time ten hand- 
looms in operation, from which place the family removed to Duchess 
County, N.Y., where he had taken charge of a woollen mill, and in 1813 
moved to New Jersey, and engaged in the cotton-bleaching business, having 
got out a patent for that process, He remained there four years, and on 
the recommendation of the British Consul at New York he came to Canada 
1817, locating on the east half of lot 5, concession 2, East York, where he 
took up five hundred acres of land. He erected a saw-mill in 1827, which 
he carried on for five years, but for want of power, he afterwards built 
another saw-mill on the east branch of the River Don in 1832, which was 
in successful operation until after his death in 1877. In 1800 he married 
Miss Jane Gibson, also a native of Forfarshire, Scotland, who died in 1835 
leaving seven children. l\Ir. Nlilne again married, his second wife being 
Mrs. Ann Kirk. \Villiam Milne, his eldest son, was born in Scotland in 1801, 
and always assisted his father to carryon the business; his wife was Jane 
\Veatherstone, a native of Berwick-on-Tweed, by whom he had five sons 
and four daughters, eight of whom are now living. Alexander \V. Milne, 
the eldest son of William Milne, was born on the old homestead in 
1837, and was always interested in the business established by his grand- 
father, after whose death he, in company with his father, erected a large 
brick woollen mill on the same site, and adopted more improved machinery. 
Mr. \Villiam Milne's death, which occurred in 1881, left the business in the 
hands of his son Alexander W. :Milne, who is engaged in the business at 
this time. He was married in 1867 to Miss Harriet Margaret Heron, 
daughter of Richard Heron, by whom he has three sons and one daughter. 


JOSEPH H. MITCHELL is a native of London, England, where he was 
born in 1822. He early came to Canada, and for thirty-two years was 



Township of York (East). 


201 


foreman of a department in the establishment of Hay & Co. In 1859 he 
purchased five acres on lot 9, on which he grows fruit of every description. 
In 1850 he married Elizabeth Spence, sister of the Hon. Robert Spence, 
ex- Postmaster - General. 


THOMAS MITCHELL is a native of Devonshire, England, where he was 
born in 1822, and emigrating to Canada in 1849, located first in London, 
Middlesex County, where he was employed by Judge Allen. The Judge 
removing to Toronto after Mr. Mitchell had been in his service six months, 
he removed with him and continued in his employment for three years. He 
subsequently engaged with Mr. John Cull, as foreman in the Starch 
Factory, with whom he remained eight years. He then began business for 
himself as grocer on Kingston Road, and built the first brick store east of 
the Don (1858). This was on the corner of Kingston Road and Scadding 
Street, and was known as " Mitchell's Corner." In 1861 he purchased a lot 
on Market Square, Barrie, Ontario, and built thereon the Victoria Hotel, 
which he afterwards sold. In 1871 Mr. Mitchell retired from business 
which is now carried on by his son. He purchased a private resIdence 
known as Rose Lawn, in St. Matthew's Ward, where he now lives in ease 
and comfort. Mr. Mitchell married in 1852 Miss Mary Ann Joslin, of 
Devonshire, England, by whom he has one son and four daughters. Once 
only since leaving it has Mr. Mitchell revisited his beautiful native county 
which, with pardonable pride, he maintains is the " Garden of the World." 
This trip he made in 1874. 


JOHN MYERS, deceased, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1807, and 
in 1830 emigrated to Canada, locating in the Township of East York, on 
lot 21, concession 4, which was then bush; this he cleared, fenced and made 
his home until his death in 1868. Mr. Myers also worked at his trade of 
shoe making. He married Miss Jane Hopper, a native of Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, by whom he had thirteen children, four of whom are now living. 
Robert, the youngest son, resides in the county. He was born on the old 
homestead, which he now owns. In 1877 he married Miss Caroline, 
daughter of Robert Heron of Scarboro', the issue of this union being three 
daughters. 


FRANK NICHOLSON, deceased, was born on the old homestead in 1850, 
and is the son of John Nicholson, deceased. He remained at home up to 
the time of his death in 1882, carrying on the same business as his father 
before him, viz.: fruits and gardening. In 1837 he married Miss Susan 
Felstend, of the same township, by whom he had five children. 



202 


Biographical Notices. 


GEORGE NICHOLSON, the youngest son of John Nicholson, deceased, 
was born on the old homestead in 1841. He has always resided in the 
township, and has been engaged in gardening on his own account for the 
past ten years. He owns sixty acres and cultivates ten acres. In 1874 he 
married Miss Elizabeth Collins, of Don Mills, by whom he has three 
children. 


JOHN NICHOLSON, deceased, is a native of Sheffield, England, where he 
was born in 1810. \Vhen ten years of age he came to Canada, and 
engaged in gardening, and subsequently taking up ten acres on Pape's 
A venue, which he cleared and otherwise improved, he lived there until his 
death in 1866. He married Miss Mary Hartley, also a native of Sheffield, 
by whom he had six children, three of whom are yet living. John, the 
eldest son, was born in Toronto in 1843. He remained at home on his 
father's place until he reached his twenty-first year, after which he engaged 
in gardening on his own account, and has always continued in that industry, 
cultivating at present eleven acres. In 1864 he married Miss Caroline 
Cooper, who died in 1877, leaving four children. He married again, his 
second wife being Miss Hannah E. Lester, who died in 1879. He then 
married a third time, on this occasion to Elizabeth Bolton, by whom he has 
one child. 


JAMES P APE is the second son of Joseph Pape, who came to Canada at 
an early day. He was born in Toronto in 1845, and has always continued 
a resident in or near the city, and is at present engaged in business as a 
florist at No. 12 Carlaw Avenue, his premises and land having a frontage 
of eight hundred and fifty feet by one hundred and thirty-five feet. He 
proposes extending his greenhouse ar-rangements, which will necessitate the 
using of about ten thousand square feet of glass. Mr. Pape was a represen- 
tative of St. Lawrence \Vard in the City Council, and occupied that 
position two years. He married in 1856 Miss Agnes Patterson, by whom 
he has seven children. 


GEORGE PHILIPS was born in Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1856. He emi- 
grated to Canada in 1876, and settled in Toronto, remaining in the city 
until 1884, when he removed east of the Don, having under cultivation for 
fruit-growing twenty acres of land. Mr. Philips is married and has a 
family of three children. 


HENRY PHILIPS, proprietor of the Brick \V orks, Doncaster, was born in 
Rochester, Kent, England, and coming to Canada in 1872, worked at his 



Township of York ( East). 


20 3 


trade up to 1875, after which he started the manufacture of bricks at Rose- 
dale, continuing one year. He then commenced near his present location, 
his yard giving employment to about ten hands, with a yearly out-put of 
six hundred thousand to eight hundred thousand. 


JONATHAN PRESTON was born in England in 1826. He came to Canada 
in 1857, and located first in Halton County, where he stayed about six 
years, afterwards coming to York and locating on lot II, East York, where 
he remained about eight years. He then purchased thirty-four acres on 
lot 7, concession 2 from the Bay, and in 1874 moved on to lot 6, where he 
has since resided. Of late years he has been engaged in the milk business, 
which he still carries on. In 1849 he married Miss Sarah H. \Vilson, a 
native of England. 


GEORGE ROBSON was born at Lockington, Yorkshire, England, in 1826. 
In 1847 he emigrated to Canada and located in York Township, where he 
engaged in farming up to 1877, since which time he has been living retired 
at Eglinton. In 1853 he married Miss Elizabeth \Vhite, of York Township. 


J. MCCRAE Ross was born in Rothshire, Scotland, in 1800, being the 
eldest in a family of two sons and two daughters. His father, Andrew Ross, 
married a Miss McCrae. Both parents died in Scotland. His only brother 
was a great botanist; he visited the mountains of Siberia, being sent there 
by the managers of the Botanical Gardens, London, England; while there 
he contracted a disease of which he died on his return to Scotland. Mr. 
Ross came to Canada in 1833, and remained for one year at Picton. Then, 
having learned engineering in Scotland, he superintended the construction 
of the first railroad in Nova Scotia. In 1846 he settled in Toronto. For 
a year he was clerk in the office of John Eastwood, a publisher. For about 
the next fourteen years he was bookkeeper and clerk in various offices. In 
1862 he settled on thirteen acres of land on lot 10, concession I, of the 
Township of York, and engaged in farming; this is his present residence. 
In 1845 he married Hannah, only daughter of \Villiam Stabler. He has no 
children. l\Ir. Ross is a Reformer in politics, and a Presbyterian in 
religion. 


A. RUDD IS a native of Devonshire, England, where he was born in 
1833. In 1853 he emigrated to Canada, and took up his residence in 
Quebec, where he stayed two years, afterwards coming to Toronto and 
entering into the employment of the Bank of Upper Canada. He remained 
two years at the bank, and then settled on what is now Logan's Lane, where 



20 4 


Biographical Notices. 


he acquired nine acres of land, and commenced the gardening business, in 
which he has been successfully engaged for over twenty-eight years. In 
1828 he married Miss Elizabeth Tulford, of Cumberland, England, the 
marriage being productive of only one child, a daughter. 


NATHANIEL RUDD was born in Devonshire, England, in 1828, and in 
1862 came with his brother to Canada, since which time he has been 
engaged in market-gardening. In 1864 he purchased his present home on 
the Don and Danforth Road, and in 1853 he married Miss Mary McGrath, 
who died in 1866, leaving him one daughter. 


WILLIAM SAMMON was born in the County of Kent, England, in 1841, 
and came to Canada in 1871. He settled in the County of York in 1872, 
bought twenty acres, lot 7, concession 2, of bush land, which he has very 
much improved, erecting a large house and out-buildings. He is engaged 
in market-gardening and the fruit-growing trade. In 1863 he married Miss 
Mary Ann Inward. 


SCHMIDT BROS., grocers, 241 Kingston Road, established this business 
in 1883' They carry general groceries, flour and feed, with a trade equally 
divided between city and country, which amounts to about $6,000 annually. 
The store has a frontage of 25 x 50 feet, is constructed of brick, and is 
two storeys high. The firm is composed of Albert and Frederick Schmidt, 
who are Canadians by birth. 


HENRY SCRACE, deceased, was born in the County of Sussex, England, 
in 1801. In 1829 he came to Canada, and in 1832 purchased one hundred 
acres of uncleared land on lot 17, concession 4, East York, where he 
remained until 1850, afterwards removing to lot 20, concession 4, where 
he lived until his death in 1876. In 1833 he married Miss Jane Long, by 
whom he had seven children, three of whom are living. \Villiam, the eldest, 
was born on the old homestead in 1836, and now owns one hundred acres 
of the same. George, the youngest son, was born in 1842, and married 
Mary Jane Sheppard of Scarborough Township, daughter of Paul Sheppard, 
by whom he has had two sons and two daughters. He owns and resides 
on lot 17, concession 3, East York. 


ALBERT SEDGWICK is a native of Toronto, and was born in 1860. He 
has been, and is still, engaged in market-gardening, at present cultivating 
sixteen acres of land, and is the owner of two acres of land on Pape's 
Avenue. He employs about four hands, and trades principô:lly with dealers 



Township of York ( East). 


20 5 


in the city. George, his eldest brother, was born in Toronto in 1852, and 
since 
872 has been engaged cultivating nine acres for himself. Mr. Sedg- 
wick married Miss Mary Kennedy, by whom he has four children. 
THOMAS SHEPARD was born on Y onge Street in 1804, and is the eldest 
son of Joseph Shepard, who came to Canada about the year 1774, and 
settled in York County at an early day. He (Joseph Shepard) was an 
Indian trader, and travelled all through the country, and in connection 
with the settlement of Toronto assisted to build the first shanty. Thomas, 
the subject of this sketch, remained at home until 1837, and then commenced 
the milling business, which he carried on until 1860. Since that time he has 
lived retired with his daughter, Mrs. Christopher Harrison. Mr. Shepard 
took an active part in the Rebellion of 1837, and was one of the historical 
fifteen who escaped from Kingston Penitentiary. In 1830 he married Miss 
Nancy \V oolcut, by whom he had seven children. 
N. SHEPHERD was born in the County of Norfolk, England, in 1814, 
where he remained until 1836, emigrating in that year to Canada. He 
came direct to York County, and settled in the township of the same name 
where he has since continued a prominent resident. He was a miller by 
trade, and located at different places, at different periods of his life. He 
has held the office of Assessor and Collector for the township for the past 
twenty years, and for a like period has been a resident of Eglington. In 
1837 he married Miss Ruth Wilson, of York Township, who died in 1871. 


BERNARD SOMERS, deceased, was born in the County of Cavan, Ireland, 
in 1808, and remained there until 1832. He then emigrated to America, 
and after remaining some time in New York he went to Connecticut, where 
he lived until IH56, afterwards coming to Canada, and settling near 
Toronto on the Kingston Road. Subsequently he purchased twenty acres 
of land on. the Don and Danforth Road, lot I I, concession 2, which he 
cleared and lived on until his death in 1879. Mr. Somers married Miss 
Mary Caffray, of Ireland, by whom he had nine children, five of whom are 
living. Hugh, the second son, was born in Ireland, and came to this 
country with his parents, and at present resides on the old homestead. 


CUBETT SPARKHALL was born in Norfolk, England, in 1821, and is the 
youngest son of Cubett Sparkhall, deceased, who died in 1821. In 1832 
our subject came to Canada in company with his mother and family, and 
in 1839 started in the butchering business, occupying a stall in the old and 
new markets up to 1870, when he retired from retail business, but continued 



206 


Biographical Notices. 


to do something in the wholesale trade. In 1845 he purchased a farm on 
Logan's Lane, where he has resided ever since. In 1840 he married Miss 
Eliza Moore, daughter of James Moore, of Toronto, by whom he had six 
children, five of whom are living. 


JAMES B. SQUARES was born in Devonshire, England. in 1821, and in 
1854 emigrated to York County, Canada, where he carried on market- 
gardening ever since. In 1857 he purchased the place where he now resides, 
on Logan's Lane. In 1851 he married Miss Ann Nash, of London, Eng- 
land, by whom he has four children. 


JOHN STRADER is a Canadian by birth, and has been a resident of East 
York for the past twenty years, eighteen of which he has been engaged in 
cultivating small fruits, flower-growing, etc. Since 1869 he has occupied 
his present home, having two acres of land on Pape's Avenue. In 1866 he 
married Miss Margaret Sedgwick, by whom he has four children. 


JAMES TAYLOR, deceased, was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in 
1833. In 1832 he emigrated to Canada and engaged in farming in York 
Township. In 1871 he purchased two hundred acres of land on lot 3, 
concession 3, which he very much improved and on which he erected 
buildings. He married Ann, daughter of John Armstrong, of Scarboro', 
who died in 1862, leaving two sons and two daughters. He married a 
second time, to Mary Watson, daughter of John Watson, by whom he had 
one daughter, who died in 1877. John Taylor, the eldest son of the above, 
was born on the old homestead in 1862, where he remained until 1880, 
going from thence to the United States, and, after residing there about 
three years, returned to Canada. In 1881 he married Emily Hawkins, 
daughter of Henry Hawkins. Mary Ann is the eldest daughter of James 
Taylor, and lives at home; Joseph lives on Yonge Street; Annie, Jane and 
Bella are also members of this family. 
J. H. TAYLOR is the eldest son of John Taylor, deceased, and was born 
at the Don Mills in 1853. He remained on the old homestead until 1879, 
when he removed to his present large farm, which contains five hundred 
acres, on lot 10, concession 3, where he devotes his time principally to the 
breeding of cattle. In 1879 he married Miss Matilda McLean, daughter of 
Daniel McLean, by whom he has three sons, viz.: John, Charles McLean 
and Morton. 
THOMAS S. THORN was born in the County of Kent, England, in 1809. 
His father, accompanied by his eldest son, came to Canada in r8r6, being 



Township of York (East). 


20 7 


followed two years later by his wife and family, which included Thomas. 
His father settled in Durham County; but Thomas learned in Toronto the 
trade of brickmaker, which he followed for many years. He was engaged 
in the erection of many of the earlier buildings of the city, notably the first 
Roman Catholic Church in 1821. He married Miss Catharine Hanan, by 
whom he had six children, two of whom are dead; his wife died in 1883. 
Mr. Thorn has held the office of County Constable for the last thirty-two years. 


JOSEPH TREBELCOCK, grocer, Norway, established his business in 1881, 
and located first at Leslieville, removing to his present premises a little 
later. He has built a large brick store and residence, having a frontage of 
thirty by forty-five feet, where he does a large and increasing trade. Mr. 
Trebelcock was born in Norway, East York, where he has always resided. 
His wife was a Miss Fox, a native of Leslieville. 


JOHN WALMSLEY, deceased, was born in Lancashire, England, in 180 4, 
and in 1825 emigrated to Canada and settled in the Township of York, 
where he resided up to the time of his death in 1847. He married Miss 
Mary Cunningham, who came to Canada at an early day. James, the 
eldest son, was born in 1830 on the old homestead, where he remained until 
1844. He then went to Simcoe County and attended school for eighteen 
months, after which he learned the waggon-making trade. In 1864 he 
purchased one hundred acres of land on lot 14, concession 3, which he has 
improved and on which he still resides. For the last twenty years he has 
been engaged in gardening and growing small fruits. In 1855 he married 
Miss Eleanor Langrill, of Eagleton, by whom he has nine children, seven 
of whom are living. 


JOHN WEBBER, florist, Kingston Road, was born in Devonshire, Eng- 
land, and came to Canada in 1870. Previous to his settlement in Toronto 
he had located in London and Barrie, and was in the employment of Chief 
Justice Harrison and Mr. C. W. Howland. His property has a frontage of 
two hundred and forty by three hundred feet. 


STEPHEN WEBSTER was born in Northamptonshire, England, in 18 3 0 , 
and came to Canada in 1842; he first settled in the Township of King, 
where he remained for several years. In 1854 he married Miss Huldah 
Doan, of the same township, by whom he had two children; his first wife 
having died, he married Miss Isabella Williams, of Picton, Prince Edward 
County, in 1859, by whom he has six children. In 1869 he took up his 
residence in Toronto; the following year he engaged in the manufacture 



208 


Biographical Notzces. 


and sale of machine oils, in which business he continued up to 1880; subse- 
quently purchasing eleven acres on the Don and Danforth Road, on lot I I, 
concession 2, of East York, where he and his son cultivate garden produce; 
they are also largely interested in bee culture. 
HUGH WILSON is the eldest son of William Wilson and was born in 
Ireland in 1812. He came to Canada with his parents, and his principal 
occupation has been that of farming, although at one time he navigated 
the lakes. During the l\1ackenzie Rebellion he took an active part, and 
was present at the burning of Montgomery's Hotel and the skirmish on 
Y onge Street, and was on the side of the Government. Mr. \Vilson is one 
of the oldest residents in the township and a general authority in all matters 
relating to township lore. He married Miss Mary Cawley, of Wexford, 
Ireland, who died in 1883, leaving one son and one daughter. He married 
again, his second wife being Miss Ann Brown, of Lincolnshire, England, 
by whom he has five children, four of whom are living. 
JAMES YOUNG, postmaster and merchant, Doncaster, was born in 
Berwick-on-Tweed, Scotland, in 1824, and came to Canada in 1853, settled 
at once in Doncaster, where he has resided ever since, and is one of the 
settlers in this locality. He carried on hotel and store for over twenty years 
and has been postmaster for fifteen years. He was twice married, first in 
Scotland, and a second time in Doncaster, to Anne Hogg, daughter of 
John Hogg, a York pioneer. He has two sons and six daughters, married 
and settled in the vicinity. 



TOWNSHIP OF YORK 


C-W- EST).. 


IS 




TOWNSHIP OF YORK (WEST). 



,-
 
\t;..
 HILIP ARMSTRONG, deceased, was born in Cumberland, 

I
.lj f England, in 1810. and in 1830 came to York, where he began 
lJ'
 business as a butcher and farmer. Soon after the incorporation 
" . of the city he engaged extensively in market-gardening, on 
Y onge Street and Rose Hill. In later years, as the County 
of York became more densely settled, the divisions existing at 
present were made, and the City of Toronto Electoral Division 
Society was formed, in which he held various offices. He was instrumental 
in inaugurating the first Exhibition of 1852. He lived to see the result of 
his labour crowned by the Provincial Exhibition, in which, with the desIre 
to promote and advance agriculture, he took a great interest. Although an 
active worker in the above society, he continued his connection with the 
West York Association, of which he was President for many years. In 
early life he was a strong Baldwin Reformer, but later was identified with 
the Conservative Party. He was a Justice of the Peace for the County of 
York, which office he held for many years, and a member of the County 
Council, also of the Agricultural and Horticultural Societies, and the Art 
Association. He was President of the Electoral Division Society. He 
was connected with various churches, and was instrumental in organizing 
the present Philharmonic Society. Few men were better known throughout 
the County of York. His connection with the various industries added to 
his great popularity. Although three-score and ten years of age, he was 
still active and retained his mental faculties in a great degree. The York 
Pioneers and Electoral Division Society, and other associations to which 
he belonged, attended his funeral in a body. He was twice married, first 
to a Miss Calvert, of England, in 1837; at Toronto he married Mary, 
eldest daughter of James Wickson, by whom he left one son. Dr. Thomas 
Armstrong, only son of the above, was born at Y orkville in 1838, where he 


r. 
-..J .> 



212 


Biographical Notices. 


first attended school. He passed three years at the Toronto Academy, 
after which he was engaged upon his father's farm until 1858, when he began 
his medical studies at the Toronto School of Medicine, where he graduated 
in 1862. He then removed to \Vhitby, Ontario, where he practised for five 
years. In 1867 he returned to Yorkville, where he has since built up a 
large and lucrative practice. In politics he is a Conservative. He is a 
member of the A.F. and A.11., and A.O.U.\V. In 1863 he married the eldest 
daughter of Nicholas Maughan, Assessment Commissioner of Toronto. 
J. BARNES is the proprietor of the general store at the newly-built 
portion of the rapidly increasing village of Carlton \Vest Junction. He 
operated a business that extended through the Township of Markham and 
Vaughan, establishing the Edgeley Post-office, which he conducted in con- 
junction with a general store for twelve years, afterwards selling out and 
moving into the Township of Markham, where he continued in business for 
eight years. In the autumn of 1882 he disposed of this, and in the spring 
of the following year accepted the position of buyer for the Parry Sound 
Lumber Company. He returned to York County in December of the 
same year, and established his present satisfactory, and largely increasing 
business. 


EDWARD BESCOBY, of Eglinton, retired, is a native of London, England, 
and came out to Canada in 1834, in company with his brother-in-law who 
died some years ago. Mr. Bescoby settled first on the Huron Track, and 
remained there a few years, subsequently removing to a farm on the Dun- 
das Road. Shortly after this we find him a resident of Toronto, and in the 
lime business, his firm burning the lime required for the erection of the 
Asylum, in which trade he continued until 1857. He was married in 18 3 0 
to Miss Priscilla Thwaites, of London, England, who died in 1857, while 
on a visit to her native land. He then purchased some property consisting 
of mills, lime and freestone quarries at Limehouse in Halton County, which 
business he conducted until 1871. There he manufactured the first Port- 
land cement produced in Canada. On his retirement from business he paid 
a lengthened visit to the Old Country, and on his return to Canada took 
possession of his handsome private residence in Eglinton. Mr. Bescoby 
served during Mackenzie's Rebellion as Captain under Colonel Dunlop. 
He was married in 1864 to Miss Helen Ashbough, of Hamilton, Ontario. 
JOHN BOAKE, one of the early settlers of York, is a native of County 
Tipperary, Ireland, and came out in 1821, settling soon after on the farm 
he at present owns and lives on. He bought one hundred acres first and 



Township of York ( West). 


21 3 


afterwards owned five hundred acres, dividing the same among his children. 
He married Rebecca Boake in 1832, also a native of Ireland, who came 
eight years after and died in 1865; five sons and one daughter survive her. 
He married Margaret Bell, of Woodstock in 1870. 


JOHN BOLER, farmer, is a native of Mansfield, England. He came out 
in 1859 and settled upon the place where he still lives; he leased this first 
in 1875 and bought the same. In 1860 he married Sarah J. Shipman, also 
a native of Mansfield; they have one son. 


WILLIAM BOURKE, hotel proprietor, Weston, was born in Ireland in 
1840, and came to Canada with the 2nd Battalion of Her Majesty's 17th Regi- 
ment in 1862. The regiment was stationed at Halifax, N.S., for four years, 
and afterwards moved to Montreal, where it was after a short stay of two 
months, transferred to Toronto, when Mr. Bourke left the service. Soon 
after his retirement from the army he married Rose Ann Hagan, a native 
of Ireland, by whom he has two children, a boy and a girl. After his 
marriage he moved to Lambton Mills, where he did military detective duty 
for nearly two years and then embarked in the hotel business; subsequently 
he conducted a hotel known as Morgan's Corner, in concession 2, West 
York. After spending four years here he migrated to Thistledown and 
kept a hotel there for eight years and a-half. In 1881 he purchased the 
hotel which he at present conducts, called the Russel House, where he does 
a good business, and where the travelling public receive every considerate 
attention. Mr. Bourke has the two following children, viz.: William 
Joseph and Mary Ellen. 


EDWARD BROWN, proprietor of grocery and prOVISIon store, corner of 
Davenport Road and Bathurst Street, is a native of London, England, and 
came to America in 1844. He landed at Philadelphia, and after spending 
a few months in the States came to Toronto. He followed the occupation 
of painter and grainer for a while, having learned that trade in England, 
but subsequently commenced in the grocery and provision trade. He con- 
tinued in that trade until 1883, on Yonge Street, finally relinquishing the 
active part of the business in favour of his son, who is established at the 
address above mentioned. Mr.. Brown married in 1858, Miss IVlargaret 
Thompson, a native of Gloucestershire, England, by whom he has a family 
of four children, two sons and one daughter living in Toronto. 
JOSEPH BROWN, proprietor of Black Creek Brick Yard, was born in 
Durham, England, and came to Canada with his father, John Brown, in 



21 4 


Biograpltical Notices. 


18 49. The latter was a potter by trade, and carried on the business here 
which he had learned in the old country, and in conjunction with his 
partner received [100 for making the first draining tile in this Province. 
The family have been potters and brick-makers for generations. This yard 
was established by J . Wellington in 1856, and was leased to Mr. Brown 
in 1860. He commenced the manufacture of brick in 1881, and employs 
eight hands, turning out about one million bricks annually. 
JOHN A. BULL, proprietor of the Carlton Carriage and \Vaggon Works, 
was born in Carlton Village, being the son of the late \Villiam Bull. His 
grandfather John Bull, settled with his family one mile east of the village, 
on the farm now owned and occupied by J. R. Bull. vVilliam Bull, the 
father of the subject of this sketch, was a waggon-maker by trade, and 
followed that occupation to within ten years of his death, which occurred 
in 1883. John A., learning the trade of his father, succeeded to the business 
in 1880, which he has since conducted with ability, and bears a good 
reputation in city and country for producing first-class work. He turns out 
a large number of carriages and substantial waggons yearly. 


JOHN EDWARD BULL, lot 7, concession 4, was born on the concession 
on which he now lives in West York. He was the son of Edward Bull, 
a native of Tipperary, Ireland, who emigrated to Canada in 1819, finally 
settling near the Davenport Road in this township, and who died in 1876. 
His mother was Margaret McKay, a native of \Vest York, who died in 
1873. John Edward is one of a family of four children who survive their 
parents, and with the exception of about ten years continued to reside on 
the farm he now occupies. He married in 1861 Susan Bunt, a native of 
Vaughan Township, by whom he has seven children. 


J. P. BULL, Davenport Post-office, lots 29 and 30, concession 2, West 
York Township, is a son of the late Bartholomew Bull, a native of Tippe- 
rary, Ireland, who came to Canada in 1818, and settled soon after on the 
farm, which the subject of this sketch, jointly with his two brothers, now 
owns and occupies. He lived at home until the death of his wife in 1871, 
and took up his residence with a son who was located at Y orkville, and 
with whom he lived until his death in 1878, at the advanced age of eighty- 
seven years. His family consists of three sons and two daughters, who 
survive him. The sons are, Dr. Bull of Toronto, T. H. Bull, Clerk of the 
Peace for the County lof York; and J. P. Bull, on the old homestead. One 
daughter is the wife of Dr. Pattalls, of Brampton, and the other the wife of 
James Good, iron-founder, Toronto. Mr. J. P. Bull was born on the home 



Township of York (West). 


21 5 


farm, and married in 1849 Harriet Bishop, who came to Canada in 1844. 
On coming of age he received from his father two hundred acres of land in 
the Township of \Vest York, on which he lived for forty years, during that 
period doing much building, and making vast improvements. As a man 
of considerable influence, he has held several offices, and taken an active 
interest in all that concerns the municipality. He has been a Justice of 
the Peace for thirty-five years, and was Deputy-Reeve for the township 
several years. As a member of the Methodist Church he has manifested 
a more than ordinary concern in its welfare, and the Agricultural Society 
of the county recognizes heartily the share he has taken during the last forty 
years in promoting the advantages which it now enjoys. He has held office 
in connection with it continuously during the period of his membership, 
and for seven years presided over its deliberations, being at the present 
time Vice-President. Mr. Bull has a family of two sons and four daughters, 
one son being settled in the Township of York, and the other near Brampton. 
1\1r. Bull was one of the founders of the Dominion Grange and remains 
Treasurer of the society at the present time. His address is Davenport 
Post-office. 


\VALTER J. BULL, lot 8, concession 4, the son of J. P. Bull, elsewhere 
noticed, commenced farming for himself near Brampton in 1876. The 
following year, his father being desirous of retiring from farming, \Valter 
rented the old homestead" Downsview Farm," after which the post-office, 
church, etc., of that name were called. He still resides on the old farm, 
which contains two hundred acres of land. His wife was the second 
daughter of Thomas Holtby, Esq., of Brampton. 


ROBERT CARRUTHERS, deceased, was a native of the County Cumber- 
land, England, and came to Canada with his people in 1810, the family 
settling upon the farm now in the occupation and ownership of his son 
George Carruthers. The father of Robert was James Carruthers, one of 
the oldest settlers in the township, they having no neighbours nearer than 
three miles for a long time after their settlement. Robert resided on the 
old homestead until his marriage, when he moved to Carlton, and lived 
there six years, afterwards moving to Toronto Gore, where he spent eight 
years. In 1856 he returned to the old homestead and died there. The 
surviving family consists of three sons and five daughters, all of whom are 
settled in the county. George Carruthers has resided at the old homestead 
since the family returned from Toronto Gore; he received the old place by 
will from his father, which contains fifty acres. He married in 1873 Mary 
A. vVatson, daughter of Francis \Vatson, of this township. 



216 


Biographical Notices. 


ED:\WND JOHN CLARK, located on Y onge Street, in the Township of 
\Vest York, was born in East York, being the son of John Clark, a native 
of Essex, England, who came to Canada at an early day. His mother was 
Charlotte Shuttleworth, daughter of the late H
nry Shuttleworth, a York 
County pioneer, who settled at Mount Albert, being a native of Lincoln- 
shire, England. Edmond John Clark in 1879 married a daughter of 
Robert Leslie, of East York. 


\V. J. CONRON, \Veston, cattle dealer and exporter; commenced his 
calling in early youth with his father, who has been engaged in the same 
line since 1845. He has been engaged in the export trade since 1881; at 
present, however, he does a local trade. He has also been Clerk and 
Treasurer of \Veston Village since its incorporation. 


\VILLIAM CORNISH, proprietor of the planing-mill and lumber business 
recently established in the thriving Village of West Toronto Junction, is a 
native of Exeter, Devonshire, England, and came to Canada in 1876. He 
settled first in Coaticook, Quebec, remaining there six years, subsequently 
coming to Toronto, where he was engaged with Mr. Fletcher until 1884. 
He commenced the erection of the building, and having now established 
his business, we may add that it is likely to prove of great advantage to the 
village and its surroundings. 
JOHN COTTRELL, florist and gardener, Deer Park, is the son of the late 
Samuel and Margaret Cottrell, who came from Shropshire, England, in 
1869; his father was a farmer in the Mother Country, and on his arrival 
here. He was variously engaged to 1871, when he commenced market- 
gardening, following that occupation until his death in the spring of 1883- 
John, his son, succeeded him in the business, and is at present entering 
more extensively into the cultivation of flowers and shrubs. 


JAMES COULTER, born in the County Down, Ireland, in 1821, was ten 
months old when his parents settled in the Township of Etobicoke. His 
father, besides farming, engaged extensively in sawing lumber, being the 
owner of three saw-mills. Since 1841 Mr. Coulter has carried on the busi- 
ness of erecting mills. He owns the Weston Foundry and machine shop, 
which he erected in 1856. It contains all the machinery necessary for the 
construction of the different parts of mill machinery. The motive power is 
furnished by two steam-engines, twenty-five and six horse-power respec- 
tively, while eight men are employed. On February 8, 1854, Mr. Coulter 
married Abigail Card, who was born in 1826. They have eleven children 



Township of York (If/est). 


21 7 


living and one dead. The former are Andrew, Eleanor, Martha, Eliza, 
Levi, Mercie, James, Louisa, Eustace, George and Ida. 
RICHARD Cox, proprietor of the market garden on lot 22, concession 2, 
is a native of Norfolk, England, and came to Canada in 1873. In 1878 he 
bought eleven acres of land, which he reduced by sale to six acres, where 
he cultivates garden produce, having reclaimed his land from the bush. He 
married before he came to Canada Miss Elizabeth Middlestock. Mr. Cox 
expects in the future to give his attention especially to fruit-growing. 


JOSEPH CRossoN,lot 22, concession 5, was born in 1826, on the farm he 
now occupies and owns, and is the son of John Crosson, of German extrac- 
tion, a native of Pennsylvania, United States, who settled in Canada in 
1805. The elder Crosson had previously paid a visit to this country in 
1801, but had returned to Pennsylvania; and, perhaps, impressed with the 
prospect of Canada, he returned four years later, having in the interim 
married Elizabeth Gower, who accompanied him. \Ve are told that the 
journey was made with only a colt two years old, on the back of which their 
household effects were placed; the distance covered, and the slow pace at 
which they of necessity moved, must have occupied a great length of time. 
Mr. Crosson was a pioneer in the true sense of the word, for, apart from the 
physical endurance required to perform such a journey, in which innumer- 
able hardships were their unpleasant lot, the prospect on their arrival at 
their destination would be the reverse of exhilarating, in a sparsely settled, 
unbroken wIlderness, with a home to hew out of the forest with the wood- 
man's axe. He owned the first waggon in that part. Time, labour and 
energy will do great things, and as improvements began to show themselves 
in his new home, brought about by his unfailing industry, with his children 
growing l.\p around him, he passed serenely on through life, feeling only the 
occasional sorrows which the loss of those we hold dear provoke and which 
remain the common lot. His long and useful career was brought to a close 
in 1868, at the venerable age of ninety-three years. He survived the 
partner of his joys, toils and sorrows but eight years, and was laid in his 
last rest by the surviving members of his family. Joseph, who owned the 
old homestead, was married in 1846 to Ann \Vild, a native of Nottingham- 
shire, England, who came out wit'h her people in 1829, by whom he had 
twelve children, only four of whom are now living. Of the other mem- 
bers of the family of twelve children which composed the original family of 
the old people, only three remain besides the one whose name appears at 
the head of this sketch, one being settled in Missouri, one in the County of 
Peel, and \Villiam L. is in this township. 



218 


Biograpllical Notices. 


THOMAS DANIELS, market gardener, Runnymede Estate, near Dundas 
Road, is a native of Monmouthshire, England, and came out to Canada in 
1873. He was variously engaged until r876, when he leased the garden 
he now cultivates, containing twelve acres. He married Susannah Bailey, 
by whom he has six sons and two daughters. 


JOHN DAVIDSON, retired, is a native of Scotland, and was born in r818. 
He came to Canada with his people in 1831, when they settled in King Town- 
ship, on lot 9, concession 2. Here John resided and, on the death of his 
father, received the homestead by will, and owned the same until 1874, 
having in the interim added to it, the total then reaching two hundred and 
ninety acres. He then sold out, and has since resided with his sister on 
the Indian Road, and owning property on Roncesvalles Avenue. Mr. 
Davidson's father was the late Andrew Davidson, who died in 1856, at the 
age of eighty-nine; three sons and three daughters survive him. 


J. F. DAVIDSON, lot 26, concession 3 from the Bay, is a native of 
Chatham, Kent County, England, and came to Canada in 1858, and with 
the exception of a short time spent in Buffalo and St. Louis, has resided 
here ever since. He married in 1868 Mary Severn, daughter of the late 
John Severn, a native of Derbyshire, England, who came to Canada at an 
early day and engaged in the brewing business until his death, and was 
President of the Brewer's Association some years; he owned the farm for 
many years where Mr. Davidson is now located. He died in 1880, having 
spent a long and useful life devoted to mercantile and agricultural pursuits. 


J. C. DEVINS, lot 20, concession 6, born in 1809 on the farm, a portion 
of which he still resides upon, is the son of the late Isaac Devins, who with 
his people, who were U .E. Loyalists, came to York County with Governor 
Simcoe. The grandfather was Abraham Devins; he and four sons settled 
in the southern portion of York Township. One of the sons died in military 
service under General Brock in 1813. Isaac bought and settled upon a 
farm located in the north-west portion of York Township as above. He 
married Miss Polly Chapman, of Genesee, N.Y., a native of New England, 
before he came to Canada. The sister of the subject of this sketch 
Elizabeth Devins, is thought to be the first white child born in Toronto. 
Isaac and his brother-in-law, Nicholas Miller, erected the mill at Lambton. 
John C. Devins received from his father one hundred acres of land, which 
he cleared and brought into a flourishing state of cultivation, and which 
he yet resides upon. He married in 1832 Jeanette Rodger, a native of 
Scotland, the issue of their union being eleven children; eight sons and one 



Township of York (West). 


21 9 


daughter are still living, Mr. Devins in 1837 set off to join Mackenzie's 
forces, but was intercepted and taken prisoner, the Loyalists being aware of 
his sympathy with the Reform Party. Mr. Devins' father, although a U .E. 
Loyalist, never received the land from the Crown to which he was entitled. 


JOHN DEW, farmer, lots 24 and 25, concession 3, was born in Deer Park 
in 1843, being the son of John and Caroline Dew, of English birth, who 
came to Toronto about 1830. IVlr. Dew, sen'r, was a machinist by trade, 
and is credited with having made and set up the first steam engine in 
Toronto. He at first carried on a foundry, but was afterwards interested 
in Gooderham's Distillery. Caroline, his wife, was a governess before her 
marriage, and educated several of the Gooderham family. Mr. Dew, sen'r, 
left Toronto and went to Prince Edward County, where he purchased a 
large tract of land, subsequently selling out and removing to St. Catharines 
where he died, in 1881, at the age of seventy-six years; he was a Justice of 
the Peace for many years. John Dew, his son, whose name appears at the 
head of this sketch, married Ann, daughter of James Charles, merchant, of 
Toronto. 


JAMES DUNCAN, lots 18, 19 and 20, concession 5, born on lot 18, is the 
son of the late James Duncan, sen'r, a native of the County of Leitrim, 
Ireland, who came to Canada about 1821 with his parents, who purchased 
six hundred acres of land near the Humber, on which the family settled, 
part of which is now owned by James Duncan. His father married in 1831 
Ann Moore, who died in 1851, his demise occurring in 1877. Two sons and 
two daughters survive them. James married in 1858, Elizabeth Jane 
Griffith, a pioneer of this township; four sons and three daughters remain 
of a family of ten children, the issue of this union. 


W. A. DUNCAN, J.P., and License Commissioner for the Ontario 
Government, resides on lot 23, concession 6; is a son of the late John 
Duncan, a native of Ireland, who came out to Canada in 1821, and settled 
on a portion of the six hundred acres purchased by his father. \V. A. 
Duncan was born on the farm he now owns and occupies, having resided 
there all his life, with the solitary exception of about two years. He 
received his property by will from his father, which consists of about eighty 
acres. He married in 1869 Elizabeth, daughter of John C. Devins, of this 
township, whose sketch appears elsewhere. 


\VILLIAM DUNCAN, lot 16, concession 3, one of the oldest residents of 
the township, was born in the County of Leitrim, Ireland, on New Year's 



220 


Biographical No/lees. 


Day, 1801. He came to Canada in 1821, and in 1823 bought and settled 
upon the farm where he now resides. An unbroken wilderness then faced 
the hardy settler, and a lack of energy or strength of will would have 
betrayed itself in any man whose destiny was cast in that labyrinth of 
virgin forest. But \Villiam Duncan endowed with more than ordinary 
perseverance and industry, commenced his life's labour in earnest, with the 
result that youth around him have had a splendid example set them of 
what may be made of early opportunities. The land originally occupied is 
now divided amongst his sons, and the well-cultivated farms bear ample 
testimony to the care bestowed upon them by their respective owners. Mr. 
Duncan married in 1831 Sarah Mulholland, of Irish parentage, by whom 
he has nine sons and three daughters. The mother died in 1883. two years 
after the celebration by the old people of their golden wedding. Mr. 
Duncan is still hale and hearty, although advanced in years, and is respected 
far and wide for his urbanity and kindliness of disposition. 


FRANK A. FLEMING, lot 6, concession 5, Park Farm, is the son of San- 
ford Fleming, Esq., Civil Engineer. The farm has belonged to the family 
since 1854, and came into the present owner's hands in 1880, and contains 
about two hundred and ten acres. Mr. Fleming is extensively engaged in 
the importation and breeding of Hereford Cattle, and has on hand about 
forty head of the celebrated breed. This is one of the finest stock-breeding 
farms in the county. 


WALTER FOXWILL, lots 7 and 8, concession 3, was born in Gloucester- 
shire, England, in 1840, and emigrated to Canada in company with his 
brother Albert, in 1864. They came direct to Weston and started farming 
on land belonging to Mr. Henry Dennis. They purchased in 1874 the farm 
on which they now live, and since that time have been doing well, and are 
in possession of a very comfortable home. Mr. \Valter Foxwill was married 
in 1882, his wife's maiden name being Marian Kennedy. 
JOHN GRAINGER, florist and gardener, St. Clare Avenue, Deer Park, 
was born in Yorkshire, England, in 18II. In 1829 he came with his people 
to Canada, and settled first in Montreal, from which city, after a stay of 
three years, they removed to Toronto, They settled on Y onge Street, near 
Bloor, where the father and son entered into the gardening business, which 
was conducted by the former until his death in 1837. John continued the 
business, and remained in the original locality until 1845, when the exten- 
sion of the city forced him further northward, to his present position, where 
he has since conducted his business. He married in 1838 Laura Stibbard, 



Township of York ( West). 


221 


of Toronto, a native of Norfolk, England, the issue of the marriage being a 
family of eleven children. Mr. Grainger was a volunteer during the time 
of the Rebellion, and served under Captain Jarvis, also under Captain 
Newbigen. 


OLIVER GRAINGER, florist, Yonge Street, near Deer Park, is a native of 
Toronto, being the son of John Grainger, noted elsewhere. He makes a 
speciality of cut flowers for floral designs. He married Lavinia Crown, 
daughter of David Crown, Y orkville; he has a stall also at St. Lawrence 
:\larket. 


ALLEN GRAY, deceased, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1802, and 
emigrated to Canada in 1820, settling in York, in which county, as well as 
well as in that of Peel, he followed farming until his death, which occurred 
on the 28th of March, 1880. During his lifetime he took an active interest 
in all matters relating to the good of the community among which he moved, 
having been President of the Agricultural Meetings, School Trustee, and 
other more or less important offices. He was twice married, first to Mary 
Eller, by whom he had three children, as follow: George, born January 
I, 1826; Mary, born July 10, 1828; and Robert, born 11ay 29, 1830, died 
June 7, 18 7 8 . Mr. Gray's second marriage occurred July 4,1830, his wife 
being Mary Ann Lang, who was born in Cornwall, Lower Canada, Septem- 
ber 13, 1810; the issue of this union was nine children, viz.: Harriet, born 
November 1,1832; married to \Villiam \Vatson, October 14, 1867; John 
born September 3 0 , 1834; Hannah, born April 5, 1837, and married to 
\Villiam Crozier, February 26, 1857; Elizabeth Fleming, born August 23, 
1859; Annie Bull, born March 31, 1841 ; Sarah Russell, born October 24, 
1842; \Villiam, born May 24, 1851, and died April 22, 1872. 


A. J. GRIFFITH, lot 14, concession 5, was born on the family homestead 
on lot 13, and is the son of the late Joseph Griffith, noticed elsewhere. He 
resided at the old homestead until 1870, when he bought and took posses- 
sion of his present farm of fifty acres and an adjoining lot of seventy-five 
acres. He married in 1871 Eliza J. Livingston, of Peel County; they have 
one daughter, Maggie E., born in 1872. Mrs. Griffith is daughter of the 
late Robert Livingstone, of Peel, a native of Ireland, who came out in 1830. 


JOSEPH GRIFFITH, lot 13, concession 5, was born on the lot upon which 
he still lives, and is the son of the late Joseph Griffith, a native of County 
Cavan, Ireland, who came out about 1823, and soon after settled on lot 13, 
where he resided until his death In 1879. His wife was J udith Welch; four 



222 


Biographz"cal Notices. 


sons and two daughters survive this union. 1\Ir. Griffith married in 1881, 
Eliza Griffith, daughter of the late Thomas Griffith, also a pioneer of this 
township. Thomas Griffith, sen'r, was with the loyal forces at the time of 
the Rebellion. Abraham \Velsh, brother-in-law of Joseph Griffith, sen'r, 
was taken prisoner by Mackenzie, held for some time, and afterwards 
liberated. 


\VILLIAM GRIFFITH, lot 13, concession 5, was born on the farm he at 
present owns, one hundred and fourteen acres, and which constituted the 
family homestead, being another son of the late Joseph Griffith. 


ROBERT HARRIS, deceased, proprietor of the \Vest Toronto Junction 
Hotel, was a native of Somersetshire, England, who came to Canada in 
18 57, and settled with his people in the Township of East York, his father 
being the late John Harris. In 1870 Robert married Mary A. Lawton, a 
native of Bridgewater, Somersetshire, England. In 1872 he commenced 
business for himself by purchasing a farm on lot 23, concession 3, Etobi- 
coke, where he resided until 1883. He then sold out, afterwards leasing 
and taking possession of the above hotel, which he conducted until his 
death on 28th December, 1884, when Mrs. Harris continued to manage the 
business, furnishing good accommodation for the travelling public. This 
is one of the oldest establishments in the district, being of forty years 
standing. 
MILES HAYDRICK was born in the County of Wexford, Ireland, and in 
1856 came to Toronto. He was a coachman and butler, and acted in that 
capacity in various places up to 1877, when he came to his present loca- 
tion on concession 3 from the Bay, and bought six and a-half acres, 
which he cleared and commenced market-gardening. He has very much 
improved the land, and has added to it, until he now owns eighteen acres, 
valued at $12,000, and by honesty and industry he has accumulated con- 
siderable wealth. 


FRANCIS HEYDON, proprietor of the old established Carlton Hotel, is a 
son of James and Bridget .Heydon, who came to Canada from Ireland in 
1828, and settled in the Gore of Toronto, where they resided until their 
death in 1859. Francis in early life followed the business of threshing for 
five or six years. He then bought a saloon near the Grand Trunk Station, 
in the township, where he continued some five years, afterwards being 
employed by the Grand Trunk Railway Company. He then kept a hotel 
in Vaughan Township about seven years, and in 1867 took possession of 



TOWllsh1.p of York (West). 


223 


his present premises, buying the same in 1882. He married in 1860 Isabella 
Gracey, a native of Etobicoke Township in this county, by whom he had a 
family of eight children, four sons and two daughters are still living. 
JOSEPH HOLLEY was among the early settlers of York County; he was 
born in Pennsylvania in 1780, coming to Canada and settling in this country 
in 1794. He engaged in saw-milling and built up a considerable estate. 
He was a most useful member of society, and assisted materially the growth 
and prosperity of the locality in which he lived. He died in 1874, lacking 
six years of being a centenarian. His son William, born in 1839, carried 
::m his father's saw-mill and farm until his death in 1882, when he in turn 
was succeeded by his son O. P. Holley, who was born in 1861 and was 
married November 14, 188 3. 


ABRAHAM HOOVER, lot 23, concession 4, was born in Markham Town- 
ship in 1821, being the son of the late Christopher Hoover, a native of 
Pennsylvania, U.S. He, with his people, who were U .E. Loyalists, were 
among the first to take up their residence in this county. The grandfather, 
Martin Hoover, settled in Markham Township on land given him by the 
Government. Christopher was for a short time in the States, and on his 
return, in 1824, bought the farm now owned by Abraham, the subject of 
this sketch. Christopher married Mary Troyer, who, with his two sons 
and five daughters, survived him. His widow is now ninety-nine years of 
age, and is living with a daughter in Markham Township. Abraham mar- 
ried in 1844 Elizabeth Cook, of Markham; they have a family of six sons 
and two daughters. 


F. A. HOWLAND, proprietor of the store and mills at the Village of 
Lambton, was born at Carlton Island in the St. Lawrence, New York, and 
is a son of Jonathan and Lydia Howland, natives of Dutchess County. in that 
State. The father died at Cape Vincent on the St. Lawrence in 1841; the 
mother died in Toronto in 1880, at the advanced age of ninety-one years. 
Their family consisted of ten children, of whom three sons and three 
daughters are surviving members. Sir William and H. S. Howland, now 
of Toronto, and the subject of this sketch constitute the male portion. The 
late Peleg Howland, who was the first to come to Canada of this family, 
and who was partner in the above business, died in 1882. Mr. F. A. 
Howland came to Lambton Mills in 1843, being then fourteen years of age, 
and engaged with his brother, Sir William Howland, in the store and mill. 
At that time there was an old Government mill and store, erected about 17 8 5, 
which Sir William leased for forty-one years, subsequently buying out the 



224 


Bz'ographical Notices. 


" Cooper" heirs and becoming sole proprietor. The old buildings were then 
taken down, and the present spacious and commodious buildings erected in 
I 845. They measure I 20 x 4+ feet, and are five stories in height, with a run 
of six stones, with a yielding capacity of one hundred and fifty barrels per 
diem. In 1855 Mr. Peleg Howland took a half-interest in the property and 
business, which he continued to hold until his demise. Sir \Villiam retired in 
favour of the present owner, and Peleg in 1868, and on the death of the latter 
F. A. Howland became sole proprietor of the business. In 1883 he erected 
the woollen mills of eight looms, where are employed about twenty-five hands. 
l\1r. Howland has been postmaster since 1856, the date the office was estab- 
lished at Lambton Mills. He married in r855 l\latilda Musson, of \Veston, 
who died in 1871, leaving four sons and one daughter. In 1873 he married 
again, his second partner being Jane Ford, of Toronto; the issue of this 
union is two sons and one daughter. Sir \Villiam Howland came to 
Canada in 1831; Peleg, in 1829, and H. S., in 1840. 
CHARLES JOHN HUNTLEY, market-gardener and florist, Bowood Cottage; 
proprietor of the market garden, Carolan Street, which consists of six 
acres. He is a native of Trowbridge, \Viltshire, England, and came out 
to Canada in 1854. He followed the occupation of gardener in England, 
and on his arrival here assisted in clearing the land at High Park and 
remained there as garde.ner for twelve years. He has carried on business 
at various places since, and it was not until r881 that he settled on his 
present acreage. l\1r. Huntley married, in England, Miss Emma \Valker, 
from his own district, by whom he has four sons and six daughters. 
GEORGE H. HUSBAND, dentist, Newtonbrook, was born in \Velland 
County, Ontario, being the son of the late James Husband, of Irish birth, 
who came to Canada about 1820 and settled in \Velland County, where he 
resided until his death. The subject of this notice commenced the practice 
of dentistry at Thornhill in 1857, where he remained two years, and after a 
short time spent at Goderich, permanently settled in the Village of Newton- 
brooke, where he now enjoys an extensive practice. He pays periodical 
visits to \;Veston, Woodbridge, Unionville and Richmond Hill. 


GEORGE JACKSON, lot 13, concession 4, was born upon the farm which 
is at present in his occupancy. On commencing life for himself he settled 
on an adjacent farm, where he resided seventeen years, and in 1879 took 
possession of the old homestead, since which time he has rebuilt the 
home and made other important improvements. He owns in all about 
four hundred and twenty-three acres of land in concessions 3 and 4. 



TOW1lship of York (West). 


225 


Mr. Jackson was in the Township Council in 1868-69' In 1862 he married 
Sarah James, daughter of the late John James, a native of Tyrone, Ireland, 
.and a pioneer of York County. They have two sons and one daughter. 


'VVILLIAM JACKSON, lots 21, 22 and 23, conceSSlOn 3, was born in West 
York Township and has lived on his present farm since he was two years 
.of age. His father was George and his mother Ann H. Jackson, both 
natives of Yorkshire, England, who came out to Canada about 1830. They 
settled in York, subsequently purchasing the farm William now resides 
upon, where the father lived until his death in 1876, the mother dying three 
years previous. One son and three daughters still survive them. \Villiam 
married, in 1860, Jane Danby, daughter of John Danby, of this township, 
the fruit of the union being four sons and two daughters. The subject of 
this notice commenced with one hundred acres, left to him by his father's 
will, and now owns an improving estate of five hundred acres. 


FREDERICK R. JAMES, lot 22, concession 2, is the son of Joseph James, 
:a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, who came to America with his people 
in 1818. They settled first in Pennsylvania, and came to Canada in 1820. 
After a period spent in East Gwillimbury Township they removed to 'VVest 
York later on, the grandfather taking up the farm now in the occupancy of 
Frederick, where he resided until his death in 1872, at the venerable age of 
ninety-four years. The father, Joseph James, died in 1876, and the mother 
whose maiden name was Frances Reesor, followed two years later. The 
surviving family consists of four sons and five daughters, all of whom are 
living in this county. 


ROBERT JAMES, lots 23 and 24, concessions 1 and 2, is the son of 
vVilliam James, who se_ttled on the farm adjoining where \Villiam James, 
jun'r, now lives, afterwards purchasing the lots Robert at present resides 
on. \Villiam James, sen'r, was born in Ireland, and went first to Pennsyl- 
vania, U.S., with his father and family, and from thence came to Canada. 
He married Rebecca Johnston, who died in 1856; the surviving family 
consists of five sons and two daughters. Robert married in 1872 Miss 
Carruthers, daughter of Robert Carruthers, an early settler in this Town- 
ship. He owns one hundred and forty-five acres. 


WILLIAM JAMES, lot 24, concession 3, is the youngest son of \Villiam 
James, sen'r, deceased. He was born on the old homestead, where he has 
always lived, and has received the same by will from his father, coming 
into possession in 1874, the farm consisting of one hundred and forty-five 
.acres. He married in 1883 Agnes Ramsay of Y orkville. 
16 



226 


Bz'ographz'cal Notices. 


D. F. JESSOPP, lot 29, concession 3, is a native of Waltham Abbey, 
Essex, England, and came to Canada in 1837 with his people. His father, 
Captain Henry Je
sopp, on the breaking out of the Rebellion received a 
commission; his death occurred in 1854. l'vIr. Jessopp has resided on his 
present farm nearly all his life. He was connected with the Toronto 
Battery of Artillérr, and finally retired with a Captain's commission. Only 
two sisters besides himself comprised his father's family. Captain Henry 
Jessopp was much esteemed by his surrounding neighbours, and his popu- 
larity among the poor, which was the outcome of his benevolent disposi- 
tion, has passed into a proverb. 


\VILLlAM KEMP, County-constable, apiarian, proprietor of fruit and 
market-garden, King Street, West Toronto Junction, was born in the State 
of Illinois, and came with his people to Lambton County when a child, 
where he resided until 1877. In that year he removed to York County, 
locating on his present purchase, which he has since continued to cultivate. 
:\1r. Kemp's father, the late John Kemp, was of English birth, and emigrated 
to the States, settling in Chicago when that large and flourishing city was 
in its infancy, removing from thence to Lambton County, and settled on 
land given him by the Government for services rendered when a soldier in 
the British Army, where he lived until his death. He left a family of four 
sons and three daughters. The subject of this notice remained on the 
homestead until twenty-five years of age, afterwards living at various places 
in the county previous to taking up his residence here. He married in 
18 73 Elizabeth Munn, daughter of the late George Munn, of Trafalgar 
Township, Halton County. 


DAVID KENNEDY, retired. The parents of our subject, James and Diana 
(Foster) Kennedy, were natives of the County Cumberland, England, from 
which place they emigrated to York in r832, and settled on Duke Street, 
subsequently purchasing property on Queen Street \Vest, where he was 
extensively engaged in manufacturing carriages until his death in 1864. 
David is the second eldest son in the family, and was born in the County 
of Cumberland, England, in 1819. He came to York with his parents 
where he received such an education as the early schools of the city 
afforded. At an early age he entered his father's shop, and although he never 
learned a trade he soon became a skilful workman. In 1855 he succeeded 
his father in business, and a few years later became extensively engaged in 
the lumber business, which he conducted until 1874, when he removed to 
the Township of West York, lots 36 and 37, where he purchased one 



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TOWllShip of York (lFest). 


227 


hundred and eight acres of land, upon which he erected a fine and com- 
modious house at a cost of about $5,000. This beautiful and picturesque 
piece of property, Lake View Park, is situated five miles west of Yonge 
Street, on Bloor; here l\1r. Kennedy has passed nearly twelve years of 
hard labour, and expended about $20,000 in converting a wild and romantic 
broken forest into a lovely quiet home, which is truly unsurpassed by any 
in Ontario; at considerable cost he has constructed three lovely artificial 
lakes that are stocked with forty thousand brook trout. In 1837, during the 
Rebellion, our subj
.ct was one of six soldiers stationed at the Old Fort 
when the alarm bell for war rang; they remained two days without receIVing 
a supply of food, there being no commissioned officer in command. After 
being relieved, Mr. Kennedy joined Captain Brown's company of volun- 
teers, which he accompanied to Montgomery's Farm, the scene of action, 
where he participated in the engagement, also in the firing of the hotel. 
After serving about thirty days he returned home. In politics he is a Liberal 
Conservative, and in religion a member of the Church of England. In J849 
he was married to Marion Cullen, of New York, by whom he has six sons 
and four daughters. His eldest son, David, is a great traveller, and is at 
present scaling the Rocky Mountains for pleasure. Charles R. Kennedy, 
his second son, was born in Toronto in 1852, where he was educated. He 
has chosen the artist's profession, which he began about eight years since 
under the direction of Mr. Leslie Judson, of this city; he is at present 
located at 22 King Street East. Frederick Kennedy, third in order, was 
born in Toronto in 18 54, is at present situated at 452t Queen Street West, 
where he has been for several years engaged as a jeweller and watch- 
maker. Three sons and three daughters remain at home and attend to the 
farm duties; one of his daughters married \Valter Foxwill, a retired farmer 
of \Vest York. 


RICHARD KERSLAKE, proprietor of market garden on the Shaw Estate
 
is a native of Devonshire, England, and came out to Canada in 18 7 2 . He 
was a shoemaker by trade, and followed that occupation for two years after 
his arrival here, commencing his present business at the above location in 
18 74, where he owns six acres and cultivates a variety of plants and 
vegetables. Mr. Kerslake married in 1862, Mary Ann Pym, also a native 
of Devon, England, the issue of the union is four sons and three daughters. 


THOMAS KINGSLEY, proprietor of market-garden on Cinnamon Street, 
lot 33, concession 2, \Vest York, was born in County vVexford, Ireland, 
and came to Toronto in 1840. He was for twenty-seven years employed in 



228 


Btographical Notices. 


farming with George Cooper. He first bought two acres of land and after- 
wards added six more, making in all eight acres, and carried on a regular 
market-garden. He married in 1851 Miss Helen :Maloney, a native of 
County Clare, Ireland; they have one son and five daughters, all living, 
viz.: Edward, Lizzie, Katie, Hellen, Mary and Annie. 


PETER LAUGHTON, market-gardener, Carlton, is a native of Bedford, 
England, and came to Canada in 1867. He was for two years in a city 
store, afterwards taking charge of a private garden. At the expiration of 
that time he leased a part of the Davison Estate, where he carried on 
market-gardening for eleven years, purchasing in 1881, twenty-seven acres 
at his present location, where he has one of the most extensive gardens 
about the city. 


EDWARD LINDNER, of Carlton Village, is of German extraction, his 
father, John Lindner, emigrating from that country to Canada in 1854, and 
settling in Newmarket, where the subject of this notice was born. The 
family remained four years at Newmarket, removing afterwards to \Vest 
Carlton where the father still resides. Edward learned the trade of carpen- 
ter, and in 1879 established himself as a builder, and during his compara- 
tively short business career has erected more than forty houses, and has 
twelve under construction at the present time, all of which have been built 
on speculation at his own risk. In addition he has done a considerable 
amcunt of contract work, and has also built on his own account, the large 
and commodious block known as Lindner's Hall. This handsome struc- 
ture is three stories high, measuring 28 x 120 feet, and contains besides 
a general store, barns, etc., two public halls and a capacious dining room 
for the use of lodgers. One of the halls is occupied by the Independent 
Order of Good Templars. The size of the lower hall is 28 x 96 feet, the 
upper hall is the same size but includes the dining-room. \Ve may say 
that it is due largely to the enterprise of Mr. Lindner that the Village of 
Carlton has assumed its present proportions, and the inhabitants will appre- 
ciate at its proper value his residence in their midst. 


CHARLES McBRIDE, hotel proprietor, Eglinton, was born in the Town- 
ship of York (East) in 1832. The family first settled in Canada in 1793, the 
grandfather having emigrated from the North of Ireland to Pennsylvania 
some years before that date. He was one of the original pioneers and 
assisted to clear the land which now forms the centre portion of the City of 
Toronto. He sold two lots, one of four acres and one lot of one acre, for a 
few dollars which, had he kept, would probably have left his grandchildren 



Township of York ( WéSt). 


229 


millionaires. After selling his city property he moved on to lot 17, conces- 
sion I, on Y onge Street, where John -l\1cBride, the father of Charles, was 
born in 1802, who also resided on the old homestead until his death in 1865. 
Charles McBride commenced the hotel business at Prospect House, Eglin- 
ton, and kept the same for fourteen years, and in 1872 bought the farm of 
fifty acres that he now owns, and erected his present hotel. 


FRANCIS McFARLANE, proprietor of the York and Vaughan Hotel, is a 
native of County Tyrone, Ireland, and came to Canada in 1850. He was 
engaged in the lumbering up to 1867, after which he leased and took 
possession of his present premises, where he remained six years. He then 
removed to a hotel a little south of this locality, and after spending nine 
years there, returned to his former place of business where he has since 
continued. Mr. McFarlane is district agent for the following agricultural 
implement manufacturers, viz.: Fleury Estate, Aurora; vVilson & Company, 
Hamilton; Coulthard, Scott & Company, Oshawa; and keeps in stock a 
full line of binders, reapers, mowers, drills, rakes, ploughs, fanning mills, 
harrows, etc.; he also repairs for any of the above, and conducts an exten- 
sive trade with the farmers of the country. 


KENNETH McLENNAN, Brockton, proprietor of market-garden, Bloor 
Street, is a native of the Isle of Skye, Sutherlandshire, Scotland, and came 
out to Canada in 1852. _\ shoemaker by trade, he followed the business for 
about six years after his arrival, and then changed his occupation to that 
of market-gardening, and commenced on his own account on Argyle Street, 
afterwards removing to the corner of Dundas and Queen Streets. In 1871 
he bought fourteen and a-half acres and moved to his present location, but 
has since disposed of some, and now cultivates about thirty acres. He has 
built on and improved his place considerably. He married in the Isle of 
Skye, Catharine l\IcKay, and out of a family of twelve children, two 
daughters only are living. 


JOHN McNAMARA, farmer and market-gardener, was born near Galway, 
Ireland. He came out to Canada in 1848, and settled in this county, where 
he has been engaged in the above business since his advent. He cultivates 
about thirty acres of land, and employs, according to the season, from five 
to twenty hands, and markets his goods fresh in the city daily. He married 
in 1864 Elizabeth Clarke, a native of England, who came out in 1858, the 
issue of this union was ten children of whom four sons and four daughters 
are living. 



23 0 


Bz'og-raphz"cal Notices. 


P. McNAMARA, proprietor of the market-garden on Caroline Street, is a 
native of Ireland and came out to Canada at an early date. In 1868 he 
bought the ten acres of valuable garden land which he still retains, and two 
years later commenced the business he continues to conduct. 


HENRY MASON, lot 6, concession I, is a native of Mossingham, Lanca- 
shire, England, and came to America with his people in 1833. His father, 
the late \Villiam l'vfason, lived in Rochester five years, and on coming to 
Canada III 1838 settled in Scarboro', where he died. Mr. Mason first 
started on the farm in that township belonging to his father, afterwards 
becoming possessed of the same by purchase, which he exchanged for 
another in the same municipality. In 1877 he bought the farm where he 
now resides, but only moved into it in the spring of 1883. He married in 
1852 Fanny Palmer, who died in 1882, by whom he had a family of five 
sons and five daughters. 


GEORGE C. MOORE was born in the Township of \V est York, and is 
the son of the late \Villiam Moore, a native of Ireland, who was born in 
1795 and came to Canada in 1809. His father, on his arrival, remained 
some time in Montreal, and about 181 I commenced to bring goods to 
Toronto by team, which he lost in the St. Lawrence River by breaking 
through the ice. He was in the \Var of 1812, and at the Battle of Queens- 
ton Heights was wounded in the face by a musket ball. He received a 
medal for his services, was commissioned a Lieutenant and afterwards 
Captain in the militia. He married Sarah, daughter of \Villiam Harrison, 
a U. E. Loyalist; his surviving family consisting of three sons and one 
daughter, viz.: Joseph, James and the one whose name heads this sketch; 
the daughter is Mrs. James Dobson, of Yorkville. George C., on leaving 
the homestead, moved to Y orkville, where he resided about nine years, 
ultimately removing to Davenport, and in the spring of 18+4 settled at his 
present location. He married in 1863 Fanny, daughter of John Charlton, 
of London, Ontario; the latter, in company with two sons, was at the 
burning of Montgomery's Tavern during the Mackenzie Rebellion. 


THOMAS MULHOLLAND. lots 6 and 7, concession 2, was born in this 
township in 1816, and is the son of Henry 1'Iulholland, a native of Ireland, 
who emigrated to Canada and settled in York County in 1806; he was in 
the \Var of 1812, and participated in the Battles of York, Stony Creek and 
Lundy's Lane, and lost his life on the Atlantic Ocean through the founder- 
ing of a vessel, The Lady of the Lake. Thomas Mulholland has always 



Township of York (West). 


23 1 


resided at the old homestead, and during the Rebellion of 1837 took part 
in the skirmish on Y onge Street as a volunteer in loyal troops and witnessed 
the burning of Montgomery's Tavern. He married in 1847 Mary A. Con- 
land; the family consists of five sons and six daughters. l'vfr. Mulholland 
owns large tracts of land which are in the Townships of vV est York, King 
and Innisfil (Simcoe County). The family are of German descent. 


B. W. MURRAY (Blair Athol), lot I, concession 4, \Vest York, is a 
native of Scotland and came to Canada in 1857; he held a position in the 
North of Scotland Bank for six years, and on his arrival here became con- 
nected with the Bank of British North America. He subsequently accepted 
a position in the Commercial Bank until 1860; he then went to the States 
to take a position there, but returned to Canada in 1872, and in 1876 was 
appointed to the charge of the Accountant's Office of the Court of Chancery 
(now Supreme Court), which position he still holds. He married in 18 5 8 
Julia, only daughter of WIlliam Henry, of Montreal, and grand-daughter 
of Alexander Henry, a famous North-West traveller, who coming to 
Canada with General Amhurst in 1760, in conjunction with two brother 
officers, purchased large tracts of land in the N orth- \Vest; this gentleman 
was the only one who escaped at the capture of Fort Michilimackinac, and 
it was to a female slave he owed his life. 


JAMES ORR, lot 16, concession 6, is a native of County Antrim, Ireland, 
and came out in 1867, since which time he has followed farming, an occu- 
pation he had previously been accustomed to. He married in 18 73 
Elizabeth McLean, daughter of Laughlin McLean, an old settler of the 
township, native also of County Antrim, Ireland, who came out in 1827 
and settled soon after at Black Creek. In 1840 he settled on the farm now 
owned by our subject. 


MATTHEW PARSONS, farmer, lot 3, concession 3, was born in \Viltshire, 
England, and came out to little York with his parents in 1820. His father 
settled on lot 22, concession 6, \Vest York in 1821, which was then bush, 
which he cleared, cultivated and lived upon until his death in 1864, at the 
advanced age of ninety-one years. The surviving family consists of the 
subject of this notice and three sisters, viz.: Mrs. Joseph Smith, of Etobi- 
coke; Mrs. Daniel Maybee, of Albion Township, and Mrs. Jacob Mattice, 
Jarvis, Ontario. Matthew married in 1841 Elizabeth McKay, daughter of 
Jacob McKay; the issue of the union being two sons and five daughters; 
one son and three daughters living, all of whom are married and settled in 



23 2 


Biographical Notices. 


the county. The son, \Villiam Albert, is now living on the west part of the 
McKay homestead, lot 3, concession 3. After his marriage Matthew 
Parsons remained for some time on the old homestead, removing to his- 
present locality in 1851. 
JOHN PAUL, \Veston. Among the most esteemed citizens of York 
County may be mentioned the name of John Paul. He was born in Aber- 
deenshire, Scotland, November 21, 1802, and landed at Toronto in 1823. 
Being a teacher by profession he resided in different localities for about 
fourteen years; since which he has always lived in the vicinity of \Veston. 
He has been l\Iajor of militia, and was Captain during the Rebellion of 
1837. He also has been Deputy Returning-officer for twenty years. In 
1827 he married Jane -Miller, who was born in Etobicoke Township, York 
County, in 1811, and who died in 1864, by whom he had eight children, all 
living, viz.: George 0., John, James, Isabella A. McDougall, Mary B. 
\Varbrick, Jane A. Curtis, Catharine and Harriet Denison. 
REMBLER PAUL is the son of Thomas and Sarah Paul, natives of Nor- 
folk, England, who landed in Quebec in 1832, where, shortly afterwards
 
the subject of this sketch was born. They spent four years in Quebec, and 
a subsequent eight years in Kingston, from which place they removed to 
Toronto, where 1\1r. Paul, sen'r, died in 1855. He was a veterinary surgeon 
by profession, and when in Toronto formed a partnership with Mr. Capriol r 
who was the first to open a repository for the sale of horses and carriages 
in the city. Rembler learned the profession of veterinary surgeon from 
his father, previous to which he had spent some time in the office of the 
British JVlllg, where he learned to set type, but apparently did not follow 
up this occupation. He practised as veterinary surgeon for about twenty 
years, but only carried on the repository about a year after his father's 
demise, although he still owns the property where Grand & Louis do 
business. He retired from his profession in 1879, and engaged in real 
estate speculations, mostly in the N orth- \Vest, where he now owns three 
thousand acres of land eleven miles south of Regina, stocked with horses
 
cattle, etc. In 1883 he cultivated three hundred acres of grain. He also 
owns a silver mine in Thunder Bay and a coal mine near Bancroft. 1\1r. 
Paul married in 1852 Elizabeth H., daughter of the late Calvin Davis, of 
Toronto, by whom he has one son. 
JOHN PAXTON, florist and market-gardener, lot 29, concession 3 from 
the bay, is a native of Alloa, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1858, land- 
ing at Quebec, where he remained and had charge of a gentleman's garden 



Township of York (West). 


233 


for thirteen years. In 1870 he came to Toronto, and after two years spent 
in the service of the Hon. D. L. Macpherson, he leased a place at Carlton, 
and at the end of five years bought the ten acres he at present cultivates, 
and by industry and thrift has succeeded in establishing a large and flourish- 
ing business. He keeps on sale a choice variety of flowers, plants and 
vegetables. He married in 1858, while in Quebec, Jane Young, of Langley, 
Buckinghamshire, England. 
\VILLIAM PEARS, Manager for Booth & Pears (or Y. & C. Brick 
Manufacturing Company), brick manufacturers, Carlton \Vest, is the son of 
Leonard Pears, a native of Yorkshire, England, who came to Canada in 
1851. This yard employs about twenty-three men and turns out about two 
million bricks annually. They manufacture both common and pressed 
brick by steam, their yard containing all modern appliances. The firm 
was established in 1880, the business having previously been entirely in the 
hands of Mr. Pears, who conducted it for thirty years. 


PHILLIPS & BERRY, Lambton Mills, manufacturers of all kinds of 
flannels. The business was established in 1884, both members of the firm 
being young men from Yorkshire, England. They imported their machinery 
from Thornton Brothers, Yorkshire, England, who are represented in this 
county by Mr. A. Jackson, of Lambton Mills. 


WILLIAM PLANT is a native of Staffordshi!e, England, where he learned 
the trade of brick and sewer-pipe making, and for several years had the 
management of a yard there. He came to Canada in 1860, and worked 
about two years for Mr. Nightengale, afterwards establishing himself in the 
business of sewer-pipe making at Y orkville, removing from thence to the 
west end where he remained until 1874, in which year he came to his 
present location where he has carried on a large and extensive brick 
business, and having recently sold out, is on the eve of retiring into private 
life. He was married in England to Sarah \Vhitehouse, of Staffordshire; 
out of a family of seven children, one son and two daughters only are living. 
His son, Stephen J. Plant, is a patentee of the best brick-making machines 
in use, together with a patent kiln for the baking of bricks. Mr. Plant, 
sen'r, made for Mr. Nightengale the first kiln for baking sewer-pipes in this 
part of Canada. In 1882 he received a diploma for the best building 
materials at the Exhibition, 


JOSEPH PRATT, farmer, lots 17 and 18, concession 2, was born in \Yar- 
wickshire, England, and came to America in 1852, taking up his residence 



234 


BiograPhical Notices. 


in Ohio, U.S., where he stayed two years and then returned to England. 
In 1859 he came out to Canada and settled in Toronto, where he conducted 
a flour and feed store on Bloor Street West up to 1867. He then bought 
one hundred and fifty acres of land at the above location, and in 1877 
another farm of one hundred acres, which he continues to cultivate. He 
married Susan Killey, of \Varwickshire, by whom he had six sons and two 
daughters. 


\V. H. RAY, proprietor of the Peacock Hotel, Dundas Road. This old 
established hotel has been in existence since 1820, and is now one of the 
oldest houses in the Province. The present proprietor is a native of 
London, England, and came to Canada in 1870. He was engaged in the 
butchering business for some time, and in 1881 took possession of this 
hotel, since which time he has received steady support from the travelling 
public. 


DR. SAMUEL RICHARDSON, Eglington, was born in York County, being 
a son of the late John Richardson, a native of Ireland, who came to Canada 
in 1823 and resided in Scarboro' Township until his death in 1874. Dr. 
Richardson obtained his professional education at the Victoria School of 
Medicine and the Toronto University, entering the former institution in 
1867, where he spent two years, and graduating at the latter in 1871. He 
practised in Toronto five years, holding at the same time the Professorship 
of Materia Medica and Lecturer on Insanity at the Victoria School to the 
end of 1874' He practised in Scarboro' three years, and in 1879 settled at 
Eglington, where he enjoys an extensive practice. 


JOHN ROACH, farmer, lot 27, concession 2, was born in Cornwall, Eng- 
land, and came to Canada when twenty-five years of age. He settled first 
in Oshawa, and after a residence of nine years, part of which time he kept 
hotel, he removed to Toronto and conducted hotels in different localities in 
the city. In 1874 he removed to the farm on which he at present resides, 
having purchased the same eight years previous. He married in 1848 Mrs. 
S. Lukes; they have one son and one daughter. \Ve may add that the 
farm of Mr. Roach is considered one of the finest in the district, being 
composed of two hundred acres; he is also largely engaged in the milk 
business, and keeps about twenty-five cows. In politics he is a Reformer. 


RICHARD ROBERTS, proprietor of Covertdale MiHs, was born in Ireland 
and came to Canada, taking up his residence at the above locality in 
August 1883. He leased and took possession of the mills, where he is 



Township of York (West). 


235 


doing a thriving business buying wheat from the farmers in the adjacent 
district, and selling the produce at wholesale in the city, besides doing a 
retail trade on his own premises. He is a man of large experience in his 
business, his father having conducted a mill in County Cork, Ireland. 


GEORGE Ross, proprietor of the well-known and popular Eagle Hotel, 
Weston Village, is a native of Toronto, and for seventeen years followed 
the vocation of commercial traveller. He took possession of the above 
hotel in June, 1884, and hopes, by strict attention to the comfort and con- 
venience of his patrons, to merit that share of custom hitherto awarded 
his predecessor. 
DAVID ROWNTREE, butcher, \Veston, was born at Carlton, York Town- 
ship, in 1845, being the third son of Mr. D. Rowntree, of Carlton, mentioned 
elsewhere. David lived with his father until twenty-one years of age, and 
then commenced business for himself as butcher in 1866. He has been 
very successful, and last year built a splendiò brick store in a prominent 
part of vVeston, where he conducts a general store in connection with his 
butchering business. Mr. Rowntree was married in the year 1865, his 
wife's maiden name being Isabella Campbell, who is of Scotch parentage. 
They have a family of eight children. Our subject is a member of the 
Village Council since its formation. The family are adherents of the 
Methodist Church. 


DAVID ROWNTREE, lot 35, concession 3 from the Bay, was born in 
Cumberland County, England, and came to Canada in 1832 with his 
parents, with whom he remained eight years. He then rented a farm in 
Toronto Township for four years, subsequently purchasing and taking 
possession of the farm which constitutes his present home. He married in 
1840 Sarah Lee, of English birth, who died in 1864, leaving nine sons and 
two daughters, He married again in 1866, his second wife being Sarah 
Rossiter, also a native of England; five sons and four daughters are the 
issue of this union. Mr. Rowntree owns ninety acres. 


JAMES ROWNTREE, lots 22, 23 and 24, concession 7, was born on the farm 
adjoining that which he now owns, and is the son of the late Joseph Rown- 
tree, a native of Cumberland, England, who came to Canada about 1834, 
and worked for a time as journeyman miller, afterwards settling upon a 
farm near the Humber. His wife was Ann McGee, a native of Scotland. 
J ames married Caroline 1\1. Crosson, dåughter of \i\Tilliam Crosson, of this 
township. 



23 6 


Biographical Notices. 


ALFRED H. ST. GERMAIN, lots 7 and 8, on the west side of Yonge 
Street, Township of York. The retirement of a once prominent man from 
the ranks of journalism (although particularly noticed and commented on 
at the time) is not one of the events which leave a lasting impression on 
the memory, and is perhaps forgotten by the many, yet the few who still 
retain a recoiIection of the subject of this notice will not forget that 
Toronto is indebted to him for being the first to publish a One Cent Daily 
Newspaper. 11r. St. Germain was born at Kingston, in the Province of 
Upper Canada, in the year 1827, being the son of Hyacinth LeMere St. 
Germain, a lineal descendant of Rudolph St. Germain, who was a com- 
panion of Jacques Cartier in the exploration of the Canadas. Mr. St. 
Germain spent his early life in Kingston, and before leaving there, in 1849, 
was one of the proprietors of The Herald, one of the oldest papers in Canada. 
The California gold fever, which was raging at that time, attracted him from 
the editorial chair; but, after tempting fortune on the Pacific coast for a 
time, he returned to Canada, and taking up his resIdence in Toronto, com- 
menced the publication of The Toronto Evening Journal, the first one cent 
daily newspaper in CaÐada. He also was the originator of the cheap 
advertising rates which now prevail in Toronto newspapers. His connec- 
tion with the printing and publishing business came to a close in 1882, when 
he retired to his Y onge Street farm, consisting of one hundred and eighty- 
five acres, within three and a-half miles of Toronto's northern city limits. 


HENRY SAUNDERS, lots 5, 6 and 7, concession 3, was born in 1849, on 
the farm where he now resides. The family are of German extraction. The 
grandfather of our subject, Matthew Saunders, a noted shipbuilder, was a 
U. E. Loyalist, and took up from Government two hundred acres of land 
on lot 6, concession 3, which is still in the possession of his descendants. 
He was killed at the battle of York by the explosion of the magazine. The 
father of our subject was born near Thornhill in 1801, and took possession 
of the family homestead in 1824, where he resided until his death in 1880, 
at the age of seventy-nine years; two sons and three daughters survive him. 
Henry Saunders married Elizabeth Gould, of Pelham Township, \Velland 
County, who died in 1870. He married again in 1877, Elizabeth Dawdy of 
Galesborough, by whom he has two sons and one daughter. Mr. Saunders 
owns five hundred and sixty acres in this township. 


GEORGE SMITH & Co., woollen manufacturers, Lambton Mills. This 
bus mess was originally established at \Veston in 1870, under the name of 
Smith & \Vilby, and continued in force until 1880, when a dissolution of 



TownshiP of York ( West). 


237 


partnership took place. l\Ir. Smith then entered into partnership at Lamb- 
ton Mills, to which place he transferred his business which is now known 
under the above name. They employ over one hundred hands in the manu- 
facture of blankets, tweeds, and general woollen goods of various grades. 
The machinery is run by an eighty horse-power water wheel and one hundred 
and fifty horse-power steam engine. Mr. Smith is a native of Yorkshire, 
England, and was born in the year 1832, emigrating to Canada in 1870. 
ROBERT S:\I1TH, proprietor of market garden on High Park Avenue and 
Indian Road, was born in Cumberland, England, and came out to Canada 
in 1832. He was variously engaged up to 1859, when he commenced the 
gardening business at his present location where he owns and cultivates 
twelve acres of fine garden land, growing all kinds of fruits, vegetables, etc. 
He married in 1869 l'vIrs. l\Iargaret Daly. 


JAMES STEWART, deceased, was born in Ireland, of Scotch parents, in 
1803, and came to Canada when only a boy. He first settled in Cavan Town- 
ship, Durham County, afterwards coming to \Vest York, and locating on lot 
13, concession 2, where he purchased two hundreq. acres of bush land. He 
lived there for twenty years, and by additions made to his first purchase 
became the owner of five hundred acres of land in one block. He subse- 
quently bought two hundred and thirty acres near the Don, in East York, 
and twenty acres on Y onge Street, making a total of seven hundred and 
fifty acres which is still in the possession of the family. He resided on the 
farm near the Don until his death in 1878. He married Mary Ann Mulhol- 
land, sister of Thomas Mulholland, of this township, who died in 1872, 
leaving a family of four sons and four daughters. Joseph, the youngest son 
of the family, resided on the homestead until 1876, when he settled on one 
hundred acres, a part of the York e
tate. He married in 1876 Jennie 
Heyland, daughter of James Heyland, of Essex Township, Simcoe County, 
who was of Irish birth; they have 'two sons and one daughter. Henry and 
J ames, the second and third sons of the family, still reside on the old home- 
stead farm consisting of two hundred acres. Samuel Stewart, the eldest 
son, resides on a portion of the York estate, and has a family of ten 
children living. The four daughters of the late James Stewart are all 
married. Mary Ann, married to James McGee, of Toronto; Sarah, married 
to Thomas Woodhouse, of Toronto; Louisa, widow of the late \Villiam 
Henry, of Toronto; Jane, married to George S. Stevenson, of Peterboro'. 
JACOB STOREY, lot 25, concession 4, is the son of the late David Storey, 
who left Pennsylvania for Canada at an early day. He served in the War of 



23 8 


Biographical Notices. 


1812, and at the proclamation of peace settled in Vaughan Township, and 
after a time removed to \V est York, where he purchased one hundred acres 
of land, and locating on the lot above mentioned, resided there until his 
death in 1872 at the age of seventy-eight. He left a widow and four sons 
all of whom are still living. Jacob Storey, the subject of this sketch, was 
married in 1843 to Sarah Snider, daughter of the late Samuel Snider, of 
York Township; they have three sons and four daughters, and have 
sustained a loss of two daughters by death. During the Mackenzie Rebel- 
lion the father and son threw in their lot with the Reformers, and the father, 
being captured by the regulars, was kept a prisoner for some time by the 
Government. The family are of German descent. 


JAMES STURZAKER, deceased, was a native of Lancashire, England, 
where he was born in 1809. He had served his time to harness-making, 
and on his arrival in Toronto in 1842, he settled on York Street, in which 
locality he continued to conduct his business until 1874. He then removed 
to Weston where he remained carrying on the same trade until the time of 
his death on September 20, 1884. In 1843 he married Sarah Mayhew, a 
native of Hamilton, Ontario, by whom he has four children living, viz. : 
Sarah, born August 9, 18 49, married to Joseph Dean in 1870; Lillie, born 
August 27, 1853; Sophia, born September 28, 1859, married to Thomas 
Connor, October 15, 18 7 8 ; Margaret, born October II, 1857, married 
to \Villiam Bain, February 7, 188 3. 


JOHN SUMMER was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1842. He emigrated 
to Canada in 1878, and taking up his residence in Toronto, remained there 
two years. He then went to Dundas and from there to Cornwall, subse- 
quently locating in \Veston where 
e yet remains. He married in Dundas 
Martha Conningsby. 


JAMES SYME, proprietor of vegetable and market-garden, Roncesvalles 
Avenue, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1849, 
being first employed by Mr. Gordon as gardener for about eight years. In 
1
59 he visited the Southern States, and on the breaking out of the Civil 
"-Tar, joined the Confederate army. At the Battle of Fort Donaldson he 
was taken prisoner, and was seven months confined at Camp Douglas, 
Chicago. He was again wounded and captured at Resacka, Georgia, and 
suffered another eight months' confinement, and towards the close of the 
war was parôled on account of sickness. In 1865 he returned to Toronto, 
subsequently commencing in the gardening business in conjunction with 



Township of York (West). 


239 


his brother, in which vocation he since continued. In 1877 the brother 
retiring from the business, James has since conducted this improving and 
extensive business alone. 


GEORGE SYME, proprietor of market-garden, lot 37, concession 3 from 
the Bay, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. and came with his people to 
Canada in 1862. His father was James Syme, also a market-gardener, who 
followed that occupation çm his settlement here. George first commenced 
business on Prospect Street, Toronto, afterwards spending some time in 
Brockville, and on his return to Toronto, bought and settled in his present 
location, which consists of twenty-five acres of fine gardening land. where 
he cultivates both plants, vegetables and fruits. He married in Toronto, 
Elizabeth McDonald, of County Armagh, Ireland, daughter of Daniel 
McDonald, who now resides in this township; they have a family of three 
sons and three daughters. 
GEORGE TOWNLEY, proprietor of the steam brick and tile yard, Carlton 
West, established his business in 1868. From a small beginning, which 
only gave occupation to six or seven men, he has by industry and enter- 
prise succeeded in building up a trade that will compare favourably with 
any in the district. He now employs about twenty men, and turns out 
about two million bricks annually. He also does a large busines in sewer- 
pipes: his output being two millions yearly. In the spring of 1884 he added 
a steam engine to his works. Mr. Townley is a natIve of Yorkshire, England, 
and came to Canada in 1850 he had learned his business before his arrival. 


FREDERICK \V AKEFIELD, Carlton, a native of England, came to Canada 
with his parents. His father, the late \Viiliam Wakefield, was a native of 
Oxfordshire, England, who emigrated to Canada in 1873, and commenced 
the brick manufacturing business in Carlton, which is now carried on by his 
widow, Mary Wakefield, the executrix of the estate, Frederick being 
manager. They employ thirteen hands, and turn out about one million 
bricks annually, also a large quantity of sewer-piping. 


MICHAEL \VARD, Davenport, is a native of County Cavan, Ireland, and 
came to Toronto in 1842. He was first engaged carrying the mail before 
the railway went through. He then carried on business for himself about 
eight years, subsequently engaging in the milk business, which he continued 
for five or six years. In 1873 he commenced farming on the Davenport 
Road, and in the spring of 1884 moved to his present location. He married 
in 1862 Elizabeth Murphy, a native of County Tyrone, Ireland; they have 
three sons and one daughter living. 



24 0 


Biograplzical Notices. 


JESSE G. \V ARDLAW, lot I I, concession 4, was born on the farm where 
he now resides, and is the son of Aiexander G. Wardlaw, deceased, a native 
of Scotland, who came to Canada about 1836 with his parents and settled 
with them on the farm above mentioned, where he remained until his death 
in 1872. 1\1r. \Vardlaw's grandmother died 3rd November, 1874, at the 
advanced age of one hundred and two years. 


FRANCIS \VATSON, lot I5, concession 2, is a native of County Monaghan, 
Ireland, and came out in 183+, He settled at once upon the farm on which 
he now resides. He was first married to Eiizabeth Conland, who died in 
18 49; two daughters survive her. His second marriage was with Jane 
Duncan, of this township. His eldest daughter is the wife of George Car- 
ruthers of this township. 


JOSEPH \VATSON, Deputy-reeve, vVest York Township, is the son of 
Christopher and 
largaret \Vatson. His father was born in Cumberland, 
England, and came to Canada in 1819, settling on lot 22, concession 6, 
four miles north of \\Teston, where he resided six years; he then removed 
to the Village of \Veston, where he lived until his death in 1828. The sur- 
viving children consist of three sons and two daughters: John, who lives 
on lot 21, concession 6, \Vest York; Joseph, the subject of this sketch, and 
Thomas, now of Port Hope. John and Joseph commenced farming for 
themselves when they became of age, and subsequently purchased fifty 
acres near the homestead. Joseph married in 1850 Caroline 1\1., daughter 
of Jacob 
lcKay, a native of the United States, but of Scotch parentage; 
they have hvo sons and four daughters--the eidest son, \\ïliiam A., is 
living on lot I, concession 3, in this township; the second son, John T., 
lives in the Qu'Appelle district, N. \V. Territory; of the daughters, one is 
married and settled in Peel County; one is in Toronto, and one is on lot 
19, concession 5, \Vest York. Mr. \Vatson has held the office of Deputy- 
Reeve since 1871, with the exception of two years, and has held other 
offices of more or less importance. He settled on a farm which he still 
owns and occupies in 1852, and since that time has purchased the east half 
of lot I and part of lot 2, concession 3, \Vest York, consisting of one 
hundred and thirty-three acres, also one hundred acres in Toronto Town- 
ship, being west half of lot 10, concession 6. 
HENRY \tVELSH, lot 16, concession 6, was born on the homestead where 
he now resides. He is the son of Henry vValsh, sen'r, a native of County 
-Monaghan, Ireland, who emigrated to Canada ill 1830, and received from 
his father (who had previously settled and bought land) eighty acres, on 



TOWllship of York (West). 


24 1 


which he resided until his death in 1867. His wife was Ann Bell, who died 
in 1876; three sons and three daughters survive them. Henry \Velsh 
received the homestead at his father's death by will; one of his sisters 
resides with him. 


JAMES \VRIGHT, floral and market-gardener, was born in Yorkshire, 
England, and emigrated to Canada in 1848. He engaged for a short time in 
farming, and subsequently adopted the business in which he is now engaged. 
In 1849 he located on Avenue Road, Yorkville, where he remained until 
1875, when he purchased eleven acres on Roncesvalles Avenue, on which 
he built a residence, hothouses, etc. In 1878 he was burned out; but has 
since rebuiit, and now has one of the finest gardens in the neighbourhood 
of the city. l\Ir. \Vright has had a fine opportunity of becoming conversant 
with an the details of his business, having in early life been employed in the 
gardens of the Duke of Marlborough at Medley Hall, England. He mar- 
ried Miss Jane Stibbart, daughter of the late Thomas Stibbart, an early 
pioneer. 


A. \V. YOUNG, proprietor of greenhouses and market garden, Ronces- 
valles Avenue, is a native of Tyrone, Ireland, and came to America in 18 4 8 . 
He spent about ten years in the States previous to settling in Toronto in 
18 5 8 ; on his advent he was engaged in a wholesale boot and shoe house 
eleven years. He then removed to the neighbourhood of Y orkville, on a 
lot he had purchased in 1866, where he conducted a dairy business for 
seven years. The tragic occurrence in High Park in July, 1882, in \vhich 
a boy was killed by a police officer under distressing circumstances, will 
not easily be forgotten by this family, seeing that the unfortunate youth 
was a son of the subject of this notice. In the winter of 1882 Mr. Young 
bought nine acres of land at the above location, where he erected a hand- 
some residence and greenhouses, the latter being 65 x 18 feet. Mr. Young 
married in 18 53 Eliza Kilfarick, a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, by 
whom he has one son and four daughters living. 



-
 


-.w . t.u..,..
, 


17 



TOWNSHIP OF ETOBICOKE. 



TO\YNSHIP OF ETOBICOKE. 



 


ACOB ANDE,RSON, lot 19, concession 2, was born in New 
Brunswick in 1804, and came along with the other members of 
his father's family to Ontario in the year 1806. He bought the 
property on which he at present resides in 1824, and, in conjunc- 
tion with his brother Abraham (now deceased), commenced 
farming. At the time of his first settlement the district was ail 
bush; roads, there were none, and schools, churches, and like 
institutions had not been thought of as regarded the building of them. He 
has happily been spared to witness the remarkable improvements which 
the energetic spirit of a modern civilization makes when once it lays its 
colonizing hand upon a virgin soil, and we trust he may be spared for iong 
years to come to witness the still greater triumphs which are amongst the 
evident probabilities of the future. Mr. Anderson married in 1828 Mary 
:Morrow, now deceased; he has two children living. 


I 
f' 

 / - 

:<.\ 


ANDREW BARKER, lot 31, concession A, was born in the Township of 
Vaughan,being the son of the late Aaron Barker, who emigrated to Canada, 
in the year 1832, with his wife and family consisting of six daughters. He 
had been accu
tomed to farming in England, and on his arrival rented a 
farm in the Township of Vaughan for ten years. In 1841 he purchased 
the farm where Andrew now resides, and with whom he continued to live 
until his death, which occurred in 1873. He was a member of the English 
Church, and took great interest in ail matters appertaining to its welfare. 
Andrew Baker was married in 1864 to Mary Ackrow, by whom he had a 
famiiy of four children, three boys and one girl. l\1r. Barker takes consider- 
able interest in raising the best breeds of cattle and sheep. 



24 6 


Biograplzical Notices. 


PHILIP BARTHOLOMEW, lot 35, concession 7, was born on the lot where 
he now resides in 1806. His father, Henry Bartholomew, was born in 
Pennsylvania in 1779, and emigrated from that State to this country in 
1800. Philip Bartholomew has been twice married; his first union was in 
18 33 with Mary Boyer, by whom he had eight children, two boys and six 
girls. He married again in 1863, his wife being a daughter of the late James 
Lever; she was the widow of the late Peter Curtis, (his son the Rev. James 
Curtis being President of the Bay of Quinté Conference of the Methodist 
Church); her parents came from Bohon, Lancashire, England in 1818. 

Ir. Bartholomew, sen'r, took part in the \Var of 1812, and died in 181S. 


GEORGE BETTERIDGE, lot 36, concession I, was born in 1822, upon the 
farm where he at present resides. He is the third son of the late John 
Betteridge, one of the first settlers in the section, and a native of the city of 
Bristol, England, who emigrated to .Canada with his wife and family, and 
at first located in Toronto. He was a baker by trade, and on his arrival 
opened a bakery on Queen Street, where he carried on business for three 
and a-half years. He then purchased the farm in Etobicoke, at present in 
possession of his son. George Betteridge was married in 1850 to Sarah 
Castle, a native of York County, by whom he had eleven children, seven 
only of whom are living. He is an adherent of the Methodist Church, and 
has taken an active part in promoting the general good of that body in his 
neighbourhood, having been a class-leader for twelve years, and led the 
choir for twenty-five years. He is earnest and sincere in the work he has 
undertaken, and as a Christian is an example worthy to be followed. 


SAMUEL \VOODS BIGHAM, lot 12, concession I, was born in 1828, on the 
farm where he now resides, being the son of the late Andrew Bigham, who 
was born in County Down, Ireland, September 9, 1867, and was one of the 
first settlers in this township, having emigrated to _\merica before 1800. 
Andrew Bigham was married twice, by his first wife he had seven children, 
four girls and three boys, and by his second wife he had nine children, 
seven boys and two girls. \Vhen he first iocated in Etobicoke it was so 
sparsely populated that he remained four years without a neighbour to the 
north and west of his lot. He died April 6, 1843, at the age of seventy-five 
years and seven months. His wife was sixty-four years old when she died, 
on February 27, 1853. Samuel \V. Bigham married in the year 1849, 
Eliza Ash. He has not taken much interest in municipal matters, but is 
Superintendent of the Baptist Sundåy school, and has been a School 
Trustee for a space of six years. 



To'ZVns/zip of Etobicoke. 


247 


CHARLES E. BROWN, west half of 20 and 21, lot F, range 3, proprietor 
of market garden, was born in New York State in the year 1839, and came 
to Canada in 1862, locating first at Niagara, where he worked for six years 
on a farm. He then moved to Sunnyside, and after spending two years on 
the farm of his mother-in-law, purchased the property which he now owns. 
He cultivates both farm and garden produce, and all his crops are in good 
demand. He married in 1865 Susannah Elizabeth, eldest daughter of James 
Charles, Esq., one of Toronto's oldest merchants and residents, he having 
settled and started in business near the corner of King and Y onge Streets, 
in 1834. By this lady he had a family of eight children, seven of whom are 
living. 


'JOSEPH F. BROWN, lot II, concession 3, was born on the farm where 
he now resides, being the son of the late Joseph Brown, who was a man 
well-known and respected in the neighbourhood. Mr. Brown, sen'r, emi- 
grated from Yorkshire, England, in 1831, and soon after his arrival settled 
upon the farm now occupied by the subject of this sketch. The mother is 
still living and in good health, having reached the age of seventy-seven 
years. 


\VILLIAM BURGESS, lot I, concession 6, was born in Middlesex County, 
England, in 1844, and came to Canada with his father's family when ten 
years of age. They came direct to Toronto, and lived a few years on 
Dundas Street, and followed the occupation of gardening. In 1860 \Villiam 
Burgess moved to his present farm, where he does a considerable amount 
of vegetable and fruit-growing. He also ships a large quantity of vegetables, 
etc., to the States. He married in 1871 Margaret Griggs, by whom he has 
four children. 


MATTHEW CANNING, lot 17, concession I, was born In the City of New 
York in 1827, being the son of the late Joseph Canning, who emigrated 
from Ireland and settled in N ew York, where he remained about four years 
previous to coming to Canada. He took up his residence in York Town- 
ship, and located at different places until 1832, when he moved with his 
family to Etobicoke Township, and purchased the farm which his son 
Matthew now owns, where he lived until his death. Our subject took 
possession of the homestead, and, by industry and perseverance, has con- 
siderably Improved the property, to which he has since added, owning now 
about four hundred acres of land. He has taken a lively interest in 
municipal affairs, and from being a member of the Township Council, was 
elected Deputy-reeve, and afterwards Reeve, which position he has filled 



24 8 


Biographical Notices. 


with consummate ability for the past eleven years. He married in 18 4 8 
Janet Anderson, by whom he has a family of twelve children, eleven of 
whom are still living. His eldest son resides on the farm; five daughters 
are married. 


JAMES CARRUTHERS was born in Cumberland, England, in 1813, and is 
a son of the late James Carruthers, who emigr
ted to Canada with his 
family in the year 1822, and settled in York Township. The township 
was then but thinly populated, there being no place of worship nearer than 
\Veston, where a small Methodist Church had been erected; their wheat 
they had to carry to Pine Grove, it being the nearest grist-mill, which was 
run by old John Smith. James Carruthers was married in 1841 to Hannah 
Hind, also a native of Cumberland, England, by whom they had a family 
of twelve children, four of whom only are living. The family are adherents 
of the English Church. 


ALLAN CASTLE, lot 28, concession A, was born on the farm where he 
now resides, and is the second son of the late Robert Castle, who emigrated 
from Yorkshire, England, about the year 1818. Robert had served his 
time to shoemaking, but did not continue in that business, evidently pre- 
ferring the medical profession, which he followed for four years. After his 
arrival in Toronto he sailed the lakes for two or three years, as captain of 
a vessel plying between Toronto and Lewiston, afterwards following the 
occupation of bookkeeper for a similar period. He then turned his atten- 
tion to farming, and purchased a farm in l\Iarkham, where he stayed two 
years, subsequently in 1825 he bought the land in Etobicoke, where his son 
Allan now lives together with his brothers, Thomas and J ames, and his 
sister Matilda. The family are members of the Methodist Church. 


\VILLIAM CAVE, carpenter, Thistletown Village, is a native of Gloucester- 
shire, England, and was born in the year 1810. He emigrated to Canada 
in 1832, and came direct to Toronto, the cholera being very bad throughout 
the country at the time; which somewhat disheartened him. He proceeded 
to Weston, and there settled down to his trade, building houses, barns, and 
all other works of the kind required in the neighbourhood. The first frame 
house put up in Thistletown was the driving house for Devin's. Mr. Cave's 
long residence in the township, and possessing as he does a good memory, 
together with more than ordinary power of observation, enables him to 
trace with much distinctness the rise and progress of the municipality. In 
the absence of schools within convenient distances, a teacher usually 
travelled around from farm to farm; spending a week here and there, and 



Township of Etobicoke. 


249 


by these primitive means the children were not left completely without 
education. Mr. Cave married in 1834 Eve Philips; they had a family of 
nine children, seven of whom are yet living. The family are members of 
the Methodist Church. Mr. Cave remembers the old Indian, John Etobi- 
coke, and his squaw, after whom the township was named. 


MATTHEW CODLING, lot 37, concession 4, was born in Etobicoke Town- 
ship in 1838, being the eldest son of the late John Codling, who died in 
18 47. Mr. Codling, sen'r, emigrated to Canada at an early day and spent 
some years in Toronto, holding the position of brewer at Helliwell's brewery. 
In 1826 he left Toronto and purchased a farm in the Township of Etobi- 
coke, the one at present in the possession of Matthew, which is now 
considered one of the nicest in the township. Mr. Codling was married in 
the year 1863; his wife was l\Iary Pekins, a Canadian by birth; the issue of 
this union being four children. He has two brothers, who also have farms 
in the township, Thomas and John. The family are adherents of the Eng- 
lish Church, and are much respected in the neighbourhood. 


ROBERT COULTER is a native of County Down, Ireland, and was born 
in the year 1818. His father emigrated to. Canada with his family in 
1822 and remained for a short time in Toronto; from there he removed 
to Etobicoke and s
ttled on some land he purchased from D' Arcy Boulton. 
As an instance of the straits to which they were often put, it is recorded that 
a man named Stoddard carried a barrel of flour on his back from Toronto 
to Islington, a distance of nine miles. Mr. Robert Coulter was married 
in 1851 to Ann Jane Patterson, by whom he had a family of twelve children, 
seven daughters and five sons, viz.: Martha Ann, born April 18, 1852; 
Elizabeth Agnes, born September I, 1853 ; Andrew, born January 20, 1855; 
Isabella, born July 8, 1857; Robert \\Tilson, born April 17, 1859; Albert 
Edward, born June 15, 1861; Hannah Caroline, born September 3, 1863 ; 
Sarah Maria, born April 18, 1865 ; Emily Adaline, born November 26, 1t566; 
Florence Louise, born September 27, 1868; David Wesley, born October 
14,1870; Frederick Arthur, born July 30,1874. Incidentally we may men- 
tion that no death has occurred upon this farm for fifty years. 
MEADE CREECH, builder, Lambton Mills, was born in the County of 
Cork, Ireland, in 1825, and came to America with his parents the same 
year. They settled in Philadelphia, U.S., and after a period of four years 
came to Canada and settled at Scarlet Factory, on Black Creek, where 
they remained about fourteen years, during which time Mr. Creech, sen'r, 
took the factory from Mr. vVilliam Taylor and assumed entire control. 



25 0 


Biographical Notices. 


They subsequeI}tly removed to Lambton 'Mills, then known as "Cooper's," 
where :\Ir. Creech worked in the mill for a Mr. Hobson, since which time 
the family have been located there. Mr. Creech, sen'r, died in the year 
1866. l\Ieade Creech was married in Hamilton in 18S1 to Charlotte Jane 
l\lcCammon, a native of Prescott. Our subject is a builder by trade, and 
several dwellings and other buildings in the district testify to his skill and 
ability. 


FRANCIS DANIELS, lots 26 and 27, range 2, was born in Yorkville, 
Toronto, in 1841. He is the fifth son in a family of eight sons and two 
daughters born to \Villiam Daniels, who emigrated from England in 1837, 
and followed the business of market gardening for a number of years. 
Francis for a long time assisted his father in the business, and in 1871 he 
purchased the farm on which he now resides, and in connection with genera] 
farming does a market gardening business. He married in 1866 Susan 
Lane, a native of the United States; they have a family of five children, 
two girls and three boys. 


:l\fARK DAWSON, lot 14, concession 3, is the second son now living of 
the late IVlark Dawson mentioned elsewhere. Our subject was brought up 
to farming and owns a good farm in this township, which he has leased in 
consequence of the ill-health of his wife and himself, and is now living in 
\Veston. He married in 1864 Ellen Jane \Vaugh, of Irish parentage, by 
whom he has a family of eight children. The family belong to the Methodist 
persuasIon. 


VVILLIAM DAWSON, lot IS, concession 3, was born on the farm he now 
owns and occupies, which formerly belonged to his father, the late Mark 
Dawson, who emigrated from England in 1824, and settled upon the farm 
the same year. He died in the fall of 186S. Mr. \Villiam Dawson was 
married in 1872 to Elizabeth Hadden, a Canadian by birth; they have a 
family of seven children. He has two brothers, Mark, now living in 
\Veston, and Thomas, in the Township of Essa. 


JOHN DIXON, lot 30, concession I, was born in this township in 1841, 
being the son of the late John Dixon, a native of \Vestmoreland, England, 
one of the earliest settlers in this district. Our subject's 
randfather and 
family located in the township when they had no neighbours around them 
for miles and the country generally was in its virgin state. Mr. John 
Dixon has five brothers and six sisters, all of whom are living. He married 
Deborah Bolton, the youngest daughter of the late Thomas Bolton, a 



Township of Etobicoke. 


25 1 


sketch of whose life appears below. Mr. Dixon is a member of the Baptist 
Church. Thomas Bolton, deceased, was born in Yorkshire, England, and 
emigrated to Canada in 1828. He lived about eighteen months in the 
Province of Quebec, afterwards coming forward to York County, where he 
purchased the farm in Etobicoke on which l\1r. Dixon now lives, and on 
which he himself resided about fifty years. After leaving the farm he 
retired into private life and took up his abode in \\Teston, where he lived 
two years and four months, being eighty years old when he died. During 
his lifetime he was largely interested in the raising of thoroughbred Durham 
cattle, and was one of the first in the township who embarked in this business. 


JOHN DOYLE, lot 26, concession 3, was born in this township on February 
I, 1830, being the third son of the late James Doyle, who was an early 
settler in Etobicoke. His father emigrated from the County of \Vexford, 
Ireland, in 1819, and landed in New York, having made extraordinarily 
quick sailing across the Atlantic in nineteen days. He rem.J.ined for a time 
in New York State and worked on the Lockport Canal, and while there 
marrried; shortly afterwards came to Canada and settled in Vallghan 
Township, where he stayed two years. He then purchased in 1828 the 
farm.in Etobicoke on which his son John now resides, where he lived until 
his death in 1873. He had a family of twelve children, five boys and seven 
girls. The subject of this sketch travelled a good deal in his youth through 
the United States, and finally in 1864 settled down on the old homestead. 
He married in 1866 Mary Egan, a Canadian by birth; they have a family 
of six boys and two girls, and have buried one-a boy. In religion the 
family are of the Roman Catholic faith. 


JOHN DUCK, hotel proprietor, Mimico, was born near Newmarket, in 
\Vhitchurch Township, and is the son of \Villiam Duck, who is stilllÏ\-ing. 
Our subject was bro 1 .lght up to farming, but ultimately entered the hotel 
business, and commenced on Colborne Street, Toronto, which place he left 
in 1866. He belonged to the band of the loth Royals, and accompanied the 
regiment to Ridgeway at the time of the Fenian Raid. From there he went 
to bush farm in the Township of Bentinck where he stayed three years, and 
then bought the property on which he now lives, known as Duck's Hotel, 
situated at the mouth of the Humber. Placed as it is in the midst of one 
of the most attractive summer resorts of the inhabitants of the city, l\Ir. 
Duck has spared no expense to heautify and adorn his extensive pleasure 
grounds, which during the season are in great demand for pic-nics, etc. 
He built the wharf at the mouth of the Humber which bears his name, and 



25 2 


Biographical Nott"ces. 


through his enterprise was formed the company who run the steamboat 
A1lnie Craig, to and fro between Toronto and the wharf in question. l\Ir. 
Duck has been presented with a gold watch and a medal by the Humane 
Society for saving life. He married in I
63 Rhoda Trotter, by whom he 
has six children living, one having died. 


JOHN DILLON EVANS, J.P., Islington, was born in the Township of 
Trafalgar, in the County of Halton, on July 19, 1841. His father John 
Evans, son of Richard and Isabella Evans (Mrs. Evans' maiden name was 
Anderson), of County Cavan, Ireland, came to Toronto in 1825. The city 
was then in its infancy, and he used to tell that there were only five brick 
houses then in it. In 1834 he went to New York, and on the 19th of April, 
1837, was married by the late Bishop Onderdenck to Eliza Dillon, daughter 
of Christopher and Elizabeth (Nee Drummond) Dillon, of Dublin, Ireland. 
John Evans and wife then settled on lot 3, concession 5, New Survey, 
Trafalgar, where he lived until his death in 1863. During the Rebellion of 
1837 he turned out with the militia to do his duty as a loyal citizen in 
quelling the Rebels. John Dillon Evans came to Etobicoke in 1872, having 
purchased lot 5 in the first range of the township. He at once turned his 
attention to fruit-growing, which he has since followed. In 1879 he removed 
to the Village of Islington where he now resides. He was married on the 
30th of January, 1
67, by the Rev. Canon Tremayne, to Isabella Beatty, 
third daughter of the late Joseph Beatty, of Tyrone, Ireland, by whom he 
has three children. Mr. Evans was in 1876 appointed a Justice of the 
Peace. He has taken an active part in promoting the interests of the 
Etobicoke Agricultural Society, of which he has been a director about ten 
years, and several times President. 1\1r. Evans was three years a Coun- 
cill
r, five years Deputy-reeve, and is now the Reeve of the township. 
JOHN FOOTE, lot 25, concession A, was born in Newfoundland in 1816, 
and came with his parents and family to Ontario in 1844. His father, the 
late John Foote, settled on the farm on which the subject of this sketch and 
his brother \ Villiam still live. Neither of the brothers are married. 


J AMES FULLER, lots 19 and 2 I, concession E, was born in Norfolk 
County, England, in 1846, and emigrated to Canada in 1871. He lived in 
Toronto seven years, and was in the employment of the Grand Trunk Railway 
during that period. In 1878 he purchased the farm where he now lives, 
which he cultivates principally for vegetables, fruit, etc., which he disposes 
of in the city. He married in 1867 in England Sophia Percy, by whom he 
has two children: both girls. 



TOWJlship cf Etobicoke. 


253 


GEORGE GARBUTT, lot 28, concession B, is a native of this township, 
and was born in 1829, being the eldest son of the late George Garbutt, who 
emigrated from Yorkshire, England, in 1819. His father worked in Toronto 
for a short time, and subsequently drew land in the Township of Albion, 
where he remained but a few months, afterwards purchasing land in Etobi- 
coke. He married in 1825 Elizabeth, widow of the late Daniel Trimmer, 
by whom he had a family of three sons and two daughters, George being the 
only surviving son. The latter commenced farming on his own account 
on concession A of this township, in 1863. He married in 1864 Hannah 
Chapman; they have a family of eight children. 1\1r. Garbutt is a member 
of the Baptist Church. Vle may mention that our subject has been very 
successful in getting together a comfortable home for himself and family. 
At the time of the settlement of Mr. Garbutt, sen'r, in the township, there 
was no cleared land after leaving lot 28, concession A, Etobicoke, and no 
road but blazed trees from there to Albion. 


JAMES GARDHOUSE, lots 32, 33 and 34, concession 4, was born in Cumber- 
land, England, 1834, and came to Canada with his father and family in 
1837. They came direct to Toronto, where they remained three months, 
and the father having purchased land in Etobicoke on lots 3 2 , 33 and 34, 
concession 4, they went and settled there, the same farm being now in the 
possession of our subject. James Gardhouse married in 1855 Ann Stobbart, 
by whom he has a family of eight children. The family are adherents of 
the Baptist Church. 


THOMAS GRIFFITHS, hotel proprietor, Thistletown Village, was born in 
York Township in 1856, being the fourth son of Matthew Griffiths of the 
same township, who was one of the earliest settlers in York, having 
emigrated from the County Cavan, Ireland, in company with three brothers. 
Thomas followed farming, and is proprietor of the only hotel in the Village 
of Thistletown, which he has kept three years. He married in 1880 Maria 
Ramsey, by whom he has a family of two children. They are adherents of 
the English Church. 


\VILLIAM GRUBB, lots 30 and 31, concession B, is a native of Edinburgh, 
Scotland, and was born in the year 1812. He emigrated to Canada in 
1832 accompanied by his uncle, \Yilliam Grubb, and after a rough passage, 
extending over six weeks, they were ultimately wrecked on the coast of New 
Brunswick, losing their personal effects, but fortunately without loss of life. 
After a delay of six weeks, during which time they remained without shelter, 
they were taken to Quebec, and thence to Montreal, from which city 



254 


Biographical Notices. 


they removed to Toronto, after a stay there of ten days. The year follow- 
ing their arrival in Toronto onr subject's father, the late John Grubb, came 
out from Scotland, and the father and son, after considerable trouble, finally 
settled on the farm now owned by the latter. Mr. Grubb married in 18 5 0 
::\Iary Hetherington, of English birth. In religion the family belong to the 
English Church. The late 1\1r. John Grubb was one of the first to introduce 
plank roads in the district, and was President of the \Veston Plank Road 
at the time of its building. 


FRANCIS HENDRY, lot B, concession I, L. S. R., was born in the 
Village of Eglington, York l
ounty, in 1837, being a son of the late George 
Hendry, who emigrated from Ross-shire, Scotland, in 1831. The latter 
followed farming, and was a man well-known and respected in the township. 
He moved in 1849 to the farm, on which Francis now lives," where he died. 
Two brothers, Robert and Donald, reside with our subject on the old home- 
stead. He married in 1882 Lavinia Meredith, of English parentage, by 
whom he has one child. 


OCTAVIUS L. HICKS, hotel proprietor, l\Iimico, was born near Dundee, 
Scotland, in 1852, and came to America in 1871 ; after spending one year in 
the United States, he came to Canada and located for a short time in Ham- 
ilton, eventually taking up his residence in Toronto, where he carried on 
business as contractor and builder for about two years. In 1873 he removed 
to the mouth of the H umber and commenced the business he had formerly 
followed in England (boat building), which he still continues in conjunction 
with his hotel business. His house, ,. The Royal Oak," has excellent 
accommodation for excursionists, pleasure and pic-nic parties, and contains 
a large room suitable for balls, banquets, etc. He has a large variety of 
pleasure boats and yachts to order. He is the inventor and patentee of 
the roller sliding-seats for racing boats, similar to those used by Mr. 
Hanlan. i\1r. Hicks has been instrumental in saving the lives of five 
persons on four different occasions, having rescued two persons at one 
time. He also formed one of the company who started the A1lnie Craig 
steamboat running daily in the season between the Humber and the city. 
He was married in 1874 to Hannah Taverner, by whom he has five 
children, all boys. 


D. F. HORNER, lots 8, 9 and 10, concession 2, was born in the Town- 
ship of Markham, York County, being the seventh son of Mr. Emanuel 
Horner, one of the first settlers in :\Iarkham Township. His father, in con- 
junction with his uncle, the late l\Ir. Daniel Horner, built the first steam 



TOW1lship of Etobicoke. 


255 


saw-mill in this township, and in connection with his lumber business 
farmed on an extensive scale. Our subject lived with his father until twenty 
years of age, and then went into business on his own account, and ran a 
steam saw-mill for several years. He afterwards settled down on the old 
homestead and turned his attention to farming, but at the expiration of 
seven years he moved to Toronto, and was engaged in buying and selling 
real estate for about four years, when he purchased the farm of three 
hundred acres on which he has since resided. He married in 1861; his 
wife's maiden name was Elizabeth Wagg, born in Canada of English 
parentage on her father's side, her mother heing an American. Their 
family consists of seven children. Mr. Horner has taken some interest in 
municipal matters, and is at present a member of the Township Council, 
having occupied that position for four years. 
RICHARD JOHNSTON, retired, Thistletown, was born in the Township of 
Cavan, Durham County, in 1821, being the third son in a fami]y of seven 
children. His father, the late Robert Johnston, of Irish extraction, removed 
from New York to Canada in 1818, and taking up his residence in Cavan 
Township, brought up his family. On leaving home Richard came to Eto- 
bicoke, and embarked in the mercantile business at Thistletown, which he 
conducted successfully for twenty-two years, and for twelve years during 
that period undertook the duties of Post-master. In connection with the 
above business he cultivated a farm which he leased on his retirement about 
five years ago. Mr. Johnston has been twice married, first to Margaret 
\Veir, of Otonabec, near Peterboro'; by_her he had two children, one of 
whom (a son) is now living in Etobicoke. His second marnage was in 
1858 to Mary Duncan; the fruit of this union is three daughters anù one 
soh, all living. The two eldest daughters are married, one to Mr. George 
Rowntree, and the other to Rev. Henry Harper, Methodist minister. \Vith 
the exception of 1\1r. Johnston himself, who is a Presbyterian, the family 
are of the Methodist persuasion. 


ANDREW KAALE, lot 35, concession I, was born in this township on the 
lot where he now resides, and is the third son of the late Adam Kaale, an 
early settler in Etobicoke. His father came from Pennsylvania to Canada 
with his parents in 1796, when only six years of age, when they settled 
on the farm now occupied by Mr. Allan Castle; from there they removed 
to concession 3, subsequently to the farm where Andrew now lives, and 
where Adam, the father of our subject, died. Mr. Andrew Kaale married 
in 1871 Elizabeth Nichol, a Canadian by birth. They are members of the 
Methodist Church. 



25 6 


Biographical Notices. 


JA:\IES KELLAM, lot 31, concession 2, was born in the Township of 
Vaughan in the year 1838, and is the eldest son of Mr. John Kellam, of this 
township, whose biographical notice appears elsewhere. James was 
brought up to farming and remained with his father until 1864, when he 
settled on the farm -which he still o"\vns and lives upon. He married in 
1850 Emma Victoria Havill, a Canadian by birth, of English parentage; 
her father was the late Richard Havill, Esq., J.P., of Rainham Township, 
Haldimand County. They have two children, viz.: Alice A., born October 
18, 1860, and Richard H., born 29th January, 1862, both of whom are still 
living upon the old homestead with their parents. In religion 1\1r. James 
Kellam is an adherent of the Methodist Church. He has taken an active 
part in municipal matters, having been a member of the Township Council 
for the past seven years, and has always exerted himself and supported 
useful measures for the general good of the municipality. 


JOHN KELLAM was born in \Yymondon, England, on the 31st Decem- 
ber, 1806. He was early initiated in farming, and on coming to Canada 
with his father and family in 1831, engaged in the same industry. His 
father was a shoemaker, and on his arrival in York settled in Vaughan 
Township, where he followed that trade as long as his health and strength 
would permit. Our subject took up land on lot 9, concession 9, Vaughan, 
which he cleared and cultivated for about thirteen years, when he sold out 
and removed to Rainham Township, Haldimand County. He continued 
there six years, subsequently returning to York County, and purchased a 
farm in Etobicoke, lot 32, concession 3, where he remained thirteen years, 
after which he moved to lot 32, concession 2, where he lived until recently, 
and is now living in retirement. l\1r. Kellam was married in the year 1837 
to Rachel Sleightholm; his family number eight boys and three girls, his 
sons being all settled in the neighbourhood and doing well. The family 
belong to the Methodist Church. 


JOHN McLELLAN, lot 23, concession I, was born in Bothwell, Lanark- 
shire, Scotland, in 1807. His father, John McLellan, died when our 
subject was an infant; his mother is still living in Etobicoke, and is one 
hundred and one year
 old. 


CHARLES l\1ASON, lots 7 and 8, range 5, is a native of Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, the year of his birth being 1836. He emigrated to Canada when 
twenty-one years of age, and after remaining a few months in Toronto 
moved to Etobicoke Township, and hired out among farmers for seyen 
years. In 1865 he settled on the farm where he now lives, containing one 



T07J.msltip of Etobicoke. 


257 


hundred and sixty acres, which he cultivates in garden produce for market. 
Mr. Mason married in 1867 Matilda Eccles, by whom he has a family of six 
children. 


JOHN MOODY, lot 40, concession 4, is a native of Yorkshire, England, 
where he was born in 1815. His father, the late Robert IVloody, came with 
his family to Canada in 1831, and settled in Etobicoke with his eldest son 
James (now deceased), who had come out before the other members of the 
family. Our subject has principally been employed in farming; he 
purchased some la,nd on lot 3 8 , concession 4, which he lived on and culti- 
vated for over thirty years; he retired from active work about three or 
four years ago. He was married in 1840 to Sarah Gardhouse, by whom he 
had eleven children, all living in this neighbourhood. l\1r. Moody was 
Tax-Collector of the township for four years. He is a member of the 
Baptist Church. 


CHARLES NURSE, hotel proprietor, Mimico, was born in lVlaidstone, 
Kent, England, in 18 4 1 , and emigrated to Canada in the year 1871. He 
had previously served his time and worked at the trade of plane and 
carpenter's tool maker, and on his arrival in Toronto worked as carpenter 
for about nine months, after which he followed the occupation of saw 
sharpener. He came to his present place of business in 1876, the well- 
known Nurse's Hotel, at the mouth of the Humber, where he has accom- 
modation in the summer months for a large number of excursionists, pic-nic 
parties, etc; the pleasure grounds in connection therewith form no incon- 
siderable portion of the attraction of the hotel. Mr. Nurse is a shareholder 
in the A 1t1lie Craig boat, which makes four trips per day during the season, 
between the City and the Humber, commencing on the 24 th of May. Our 
subject was married in 186 5 to Mary Sunnuck; they had one child, a boy. 
Mr. Nurse has earned a wide-spread reputation as a runner, having 
defeated all opponents at distances varying from one to ten miles, and the 
trophies of his numerous victories on view at the hotel are to him a source 
of pardonable pride. He a!so does quite a business in fishing in the spring 
which he markets in the city; he builds his own boats for this purpose. 
lVlr. Nurse has been instrumental in saving a number of lives from drowning 
in his vicinity, and in addition to several medals received from the Humane 
Society, he has been presented by friends of the rescued parties with valu- 
able mementoes of his courage. 


EDWARD O'BRIEN, lot 29, concession 3, is a native cf this township, 
and was born in 18 5 2 , being the youngest son of the late Christopher 
18 



25 8 


Biographlcal Notices. 


O'Brien. His father was one of the earliest settlers in this part of the 
township, and emigrated from County \Vestmeath, Ireland, at an early 
day, and lived for over fifty years on the lot now occupied by his son 
Edward, and followed the occupation of farming up to the period of 
his death. He had two other sons farmers, Patrick in the Township of 
Mornington, Perth County, and Thomas in Clinton, Huron County. The 
subject of this notice has always remained on the old homestead, which he 
became possessed of at his father's death. His mother died about two 
years ago. He married in 1884 Elizabeth Shannon, of Canadian birth. He 
belongs to the Roman Catholic faith. 


JONATHAN ORTH, lots E and F, was born in the Township of Markham, 
York County, in 1815. His father, Abraham Orth, emigrated from the 
State of Pennsylvania after the \Var of Independence, and settled in 
Markham, being one of the first pioneers of that section. His family con- 
sisted of four sons and two daughters, of whom Jonathan was the youngest, 
two other of his sons are still living, one in Toronto Township, Peel County, 
and one in Woodstock, Oxford County. l\'lr. Orth, sen'r, removed from 
Markham to Etobicoke Township, and was amongst the first settlers in this 
township. He died here in 1843. Jonathan inherited a part of his father's 
patrimony, and has been very successful through hfe. Having grown up 
as it were with the growth of the township, he has taken an active part in 
municipal matters; he was for sixteen years Assessor, and while a member 
of the Council held for some time the office of Deputy-Reeve; was School 
Trustee for over twenty-one years, and is now Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Board. He was twice married, first to Miss McDonnell in 18 35, by 
whom he had a family of four children. His second wife was Miss Rutledge, 
of Canadian birth, also dead; the fruit of this union was one child. Mr. 
Orth is still hale and hearty in spite of advancing years, and appears likely 
to live long-which is the earnest wish of all his friends-to enjoy the com- 
forts with which through the labours of a long life he has been able to 
surround himself. 


JERAD PAISLEY, lot 19, concession 3, is a native of Fermanagh, Ireland, 
and came with his father and family to Canada in 1817; they located in 
Toronto for some months, and while here Mr. Paisley, sen'r, unfortunately 
lost his life. Being desirous of forwarding some letters to the Old Country, 
he, in company with two others, rowed off to a vessel lying in the Bay 
about to sail east, and on their return to shore they were overtaken by a 
squall, which capsized th
 small boat; his companions saved themselves by 



TOW1lship of E tobicoke. 


259 


clinging to the overturned craft, but Mr. Paisley, not so fortunate, was 
drowned. The widow married again, and young J erad lived with.his step- 
father until he was sixteen years of age. He was brought up to farming, 
and on commencing for himself obtained fifty acres in the Gore of Toronto 
which he cleared; this he afterwards sold, and purchased one hundred 
acres in Etobicoke, the same on which he now lives. He married in 18 3 8 
Rebecca Rutledge, also a native of Fermanagh. During the Mackenzie 
Rebellion Mr. Paisley joined Denison's Cavalry and remained until the 
disbandment of the volunteers. Mr. Paisley was twice married; his second 
wife's name was Martha Ann Hillis. The family consists of five sons and 
five daughters, some of the sons being in the service of the Government. 


JAMES PEACOCK, lot 17, concession 3, was born on the lot where he now 
resides in the year 1830. He is the second son and fourth in order in the 
family of Jonathan Peacock, one of the first settlers in Etobicoke. The 
latter was a native of Helmsley, England, and when he first settled here no 
roads, or the still more visible signs of civilization, churches and schools, 
were to be seen. Religious worship was conducted in different farm houses 
by a Mr. Robert Walker, of Toronto, who travelled to and fro on foot. 
James Peacock married in 1859; his wife's name was Mary Dawson, a 
daughter of Mr. Mark Dawson; they have a family of seven children living; 
two are dead. Mr. Peacock has succeeded in making a very comfortable 
home for himself and family. 


THOMAS RAMAGE, lot 17, concesssion 4, was born in Scotland in 1826 
and accompanied his parents to Canada in 1833. Almost immediately on 
their arrival in York they removed to and settled in the Gore of Toronto, 
where his father, the late James Ramage, engaged in farming until his death 
in 1838. Thomas continued to reside on the old homestead until 18 53, 
when he moved to the Township of Etobicoke and purchased the property 
where is situated his present residence. Mr. Ramage married in 18 53 
Maria Mercer, of Canadian birth, by whom he has one daughter, now 
married. They belong to the Methodist Church. 


GEORGE ROWNTREE, lot 34, concession A, was born in this township 
in 18 5 6 , being a son of Joseph Rowntree, deceased, late of Weston, a sketch 
of whose life appears under another heading. Our subject lived continu- 
ously with his father up to the two years preceding the death of the latter. 
In 1881 he embarked in the grist and milling business at the Humberford 
Mills, in addition to which he farms the lot above mentioned. l\Ir. Rown- 
tree married in 1883 Angeline Duncan Johnstone, of Canadian birth. 



260 


Biograpltical Notices. 


Jom
 ROWNTREE, lot 38, concession A, was born in this township in 
the year ! 846, being the eldest son of the late Joseph Rowntree, one of the 
earliest settlers in this section. Mr. Rowntree, sen'r, emigrated from Cum- 
berland, England, in 1830, and having learned the milling business continued 
the same on his arrival here. In the year 1843 he built the flour-mill now 
known as the Green Holm Mills, which he conducted until 1877, removing 
to \Veston about that time, where he lived until his death a year or two 
after; his wife is still living. The Humberford Mills, about a mile south 
of.the present locality, were also started by the deceased gentleman, and are 
now owned by George Rowntree, a younger brother of the subject of this 
sketch. John Rowntree married in 1876 Sarah Hamilton Torrance, of 
Etobicoke; the result of the union being three children-one boy and two 
girls. 1\1r. Rowntree does a large merchant milling business, his brand of 
flour in the market being known as a superior article; he also runs a saw- 
mill in connection on the York side of the Humber. The family are adher- 
ents of the 11ethodist Church. 


JOSEPH RUSH, lot I, range 3, was born in Oxfordshire, England, in 
18.t-9. He emigrated to Canada in 1868, came direct to :\limico, and hired 
out for four or five years. He purchased in 1870 the property on which he 
now resides, and in 1873 commenced market-gardening, in which he has 
been successful, finding a great and increasing demand for his produce; 
occasionally he ships to the States. He was married in 1874; his wife being 
CarolinE' Burgess, by whom he has a family of four children. 


NEWMAN SILVERTHORNE, lot 10, concession 4, was born in the Township 
of Etobicoke, as also his father before him. His 
randfather came from 
Jersey and settled in this section as a pioneer. Newman was educated in 
Toronto at a school on Colborne Street, kept by a l\Ir. Hodgson. Having 
lived all his life in the township he has noted with satisfaction the vast 
improvements which have taken place, and well remembers the first baptism 
which took place at the Baptist Church, Somerville. l\Ir. Silverthorne 
married in 1857 Almira Beals, by whom he has a family of four children. 


\VILLIAM SIMPSON, brick manufacturer, Mimico, was born in the County 
of Derry, Ireland, in 1820, and accompanied by his brother John came to 
America in 1836. He lived for about eight years in the United States, 
and while there his brother died. He then came to Canada, and located 
in Toronto, where he resided thirty-seven years and followed his present 
business on Kingston Road and in the city, the latter place being on the 
site now occupied by the Grand Trunk Railway shops. He also made 



Township of Etobicokc. 


261 


bticks on South Park Street, near the Don, and supplied bricks for some of 
the principal buildings in Toronto. He subsequently went to Carlton and 
conducted the same business there for a period of three years, ultimately 
taking possession of his present premises where he still continues to manu- 
facture red brick on a large scale. He was twice married, first in 1842, by 
which union there were three children. His second wife was Catharine 
Doherty, by whom he has a family of thirteen children. He has a son who 
keeps a hotel on the corner of Y onge and Richmond Streets, Toronto. 


THOMAS \VILSON SMITH, lots 9, 10 and II, concession B, is the son of 
the late Thomas Smith, who kept a hotel on the Dundas Road for over 
seventeen years. The latter was from Yorkshire, England, and on his 
arrival in Toronto was engaged in the manufacture of crockery ware for 
three years. He afterwards kept the Bay Horse Hotel in the city for two 
years, and then took up his residence in Islington on the Dundas Road, 
where Thomas \Vilson Smith was born in 1857. He was brought up prin- 
cipally to farming, and now occupies one hundred and four acres left him 
by his father, who died in 1872; his mother is still living. Thomas \Vilson 
married in 1878 Mary Ann Marshall, by whom he has three children. 


EDWARD STOCK, lots 13 and 14, Mimico Estate, is a native of Lanca- 
shire, England, and was born in the year 1815. His father was James 
Stock who, emigrating to Canada with his family in 1830, came direct to 
York County, and settled in the Township of Etobicoke on lot 8, meridian 
2, where he commenced farming, after having cleared the land which was 
at first all bush. Edward remained with his father until his marriage, which 
took place in 1836; his wife's maiden name was O'Hara (now deceased). 
and the fruit of the union was eight children, all living but one. On 
leaving the homestead he rented a farm in the township where he lived 
about twenty years, afterwards purchasing the property on which he now 
resides, about one hundred and ninety acres. Mr. Stock has a very 
comfortable home and a well-tilled farm. 


JOHN STRONG, lot 15, concession A, was born in the Township of 
Albion, Peel County, and is the son of Mr. Henry Strong of that section. 
The latter is a very old settler in Albion, and came out in 1835 from County 
Cavan, Ireland, and took an active part as a Loyalist in the Rebellion of 
18 37-8. Our subject came to Etobicoke in 1862. and took possession of a 
farm purchased for him by his father; the same farm on which he at 
present resides and owns. At the time of his first settJement only about 
thirty acres were fit for tillage, the rest being bush which he has since cleared, 



262 


Biographical Notices. 


and he now has one of the finest farms in the township. Mr. Strong was 
married in 1867; his wife was Mary Jane, daughter of Mr. Matthew Can- 
ning, the present Reeve of Etobicoke. They had seven children, two of 
whom are dead. l\Ir. Strong has been an active member of the Loyal 
Orange Association for over twenty-five years, having joined L.O.L. No. 
184, Albion, July 12, 1859. 


HENRY THOMPSON, lot 40, concession 4, waggon-maker, was born in 
Yorkshire, England, in 1817, and came to Canada with his mother and 
family in 1830. His father had come to Canada about ten years previously, 
and died two years after his arrival. The family came direct to Etobicoke, 
and settled on lot 17, concession 4, for a short time, afterwards moving to 
lot 31, concession 3, the same farm being now in possession of our subject's 
brother, Richard Thomas. In the year 1835 Henry went to Brampton, and 
was taught the trade of waggon-maker, and after remaining there six years, 
removed to Clairville where he carried on a waggon-making business for 
twenty years. He then came to the lot above-mentioned, and commenced 
farming on a small scale, which he continued some time, and in 1878 
returned to the Village of Clairville and recommenced the waggon business 
which he still conducts. He married in the year 1840 Eleanor Hether- 
ington, of English birth; they have no family. Mr. Thomas for many 
years belonged to the Primitive Methodist Church, and was superintendent 
of the Sabbath school for about twenty-five years. 


GEORGE A. THOMPSON, meridian 2, is descended from a family who 
settled in this township in 1803. His grandfather, Alexander Thompson, 
was a sergeant in the King's Rangers, and on receiving his discharge 
together with a pension, he drew two hundred acres of land from the 
Government, on which he located in the year above-mentioned. As an 
instance of the value of land in those days we may mention that the half 
of this lot was sold shortly afterwards for a set of harrow pins, an old mare 
and $30 in cash; the same one hundred acres is now worth o\'er $10,000. 
His father, the late Archibald Thompson, was born on the farm adjoining 
that which is occupied by the son; he died February 12, 1865. 
r. George 
A. Thompson was married in 1877 to Georgina Peers. Among the reminis- 
cences of Old Toronto handed down by the grandfather, we may mention 
that he remembers well the Americans landing at York in 1812, and the 
bodies being laid out after the explosion of the magazine. He was out at 
the time of the Rebellion of 1837, and the family are still in possession of 
the musket which he carried on the memorable occasion of the Y onge 
Street skirmish. He planted potatoes on the present site of Osgoode Hall. 



Township of Etobicoke. 


26 3 


JOHN TORRANCE, lot 3 8 , concession I, was born in the Parish of Stone- 
house, Lanarkshire, Scotland, on July 22, 1819. In his youth he was 
employed in the distillery business for about eighteen years, and worked for 
three different firms in Scotland. He came to Canada in 1848, and, on 
locating in York County, Ontario, worked for one year in Scarboro' Town- 
ship. He afterwards worked in Vaughan Township, and in 1851 rented a 
farm where he lived for two years, keeping bachelor's hall. In 1853 he 
married Miss Jane McLellan, of Etobicoke, by whom he has a family of 
seven children, five girls and two boys. In the year 1869 he purchased the 
farm where he now resides, which he continues assiduously to cultivate. 
His interest in all matters agricultural has been very great, he having in 
his possession several prizes received at different fairs for his exhibits. 


THOMAS UMPLEBY, lots 6 and 7, concession 3, was born in the neigh- 
bourhood of Doncaster, Yorkshire, England, and emigrated to Canada in 
1842. He came direct to Toronto, and worked for a few months with 
Jacques and Hay; afterwards rented a farm near Springfield, Toronto 
Township, where he remained seven ýears. He then removed to a two- 
hundred-acre farm in the Indian Village, having obtained a lease for ten 
years, but at the expiration of two years was obliged to retire on account of 
a fit of ague. He next went to Somerville, and \vorked for two years at the 
chair factory, afterwards renting the same, which business he conducted. for 
seven or eight years. He subsequently rented two farms on Dundas Road 
near Dixie, where he stayed ten years, which proved very successful in a 
pecuniary sense, and ultimately purchased the farm where he now resides. 
Mr. Umpleby married in 1844 Mary Vaughan, by whom he has a family of 
four daughters and one son living, two sons having died. The daughters 
are all married. 


PETER WARDLAW, lot 24, concession A, is a native of Scotland, and 
was born near Glasgow, being the youngest living son of the late Peter 
\Vardlaw, who emigrated with his wife and family to Canada in the year 
1835. His father came direct to York County, and purchased land in 
concession 4 of West York, where he lived until his death; his wife, the 
mother of our subject, is still living in this township, and is ninety-nine years 
of age; she is a native of Scotland, and was born near Bothwell Bridge, the 
scene of the historical battle of that name. The family consisted of eleven 
children, three only being now alive. The subject of this biographical 
notice lived with his father on the old homestead until 1844; and having 
married the year previous he took possession of the farm where he now 



26 4 


Biographical Notices. 


lives. His wife's name was Julia Clark, who was born in Canada of Irish 
parents; they have a family of seven children. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian Church. 


CHARLES \V ARE, merchant, was born in Bridgewater, Somersetshire, 
England, in 1824. Before coming to Canada in 1849, he had been for a 
short time in the boot and shoe business in Birmingham, and on his arrival 
here he started the same business at 103 Y onge Street, Toronto, which he 
continued for ten years. He subsequently went to Hamilton and after a 
short stay there of seven months returned to Toronto and resumed business. 
In 1859 he came to Lambton Mills, and, after seven years spent in the shoe 
business, he commenced the general store which he at present carries on. 
He married the year before he emigrated, his wife's maiden name was 
Elizabeth Knight. 


JOHN \VATT, retired, Thistletown Village, was a blacksmith by trade 
and a native of Scotland. He was born in 1820 at North Berwick, East 
Lothian. His father was a soldier in the British Army, and our subject's 
early years were spent with his grandparents. After learning his trade in 
Berwickshire he came to Canada in 1843, and worked for his father in 
Toronto, the latter having received his honourable discharge from the Royal 
Artillery, for seven years. About the end of this time he married Ann 
Fleming, and a year later (1850) he moved from Toronto to his present 
residence in Thistletown, where he followed his trade until a short time ago. 
His first wife having died, he married a second time :\lary Fleming; his 
family consists of two sons, one by each wife. He has been very successful 
in business, and his present comfortable home is the result of thrift and 
industry. Mr. vVatt is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 


ROBERT \VILSON, lot 32, concession B, was born in the parish of l\Iulla- 
brack, County Armagh, Ireland, in 1817, being the third son of Mr. Joseph 
\Vilson, of that place. Our subject served in the Irish Constabulary four 
years and nine months and emigrated to Canada in 1849, accompanied by 
his wife and two children. After landing, his wife and family were taken 
ill with fever, which delayed their arrival in York two months. He first 
settled in York Township, where he lived about ten years. In the year 
1873 he bought the farm on which he now lives, and during his settlement 
here has done remarkably well, his present comfortable home abundantly 
testifying to this fact. He married in 1845, before he left Ireland, Martha 
l\IcLellan, by whom he had a family of nine children, one of whom is dead. 
Of four sons living, one is the Rev. \Villiam \Vilson; one daughter married 
the Rev. i\Iatthew Couron. 



Towns/lip of Etobicoke. 


265 


SAMUEL R. WOOD, lot 8, concession I, was born in the City of New 
York, being the eldest son of the late Samuel Wood, a well-known and 
respected resident of Etobicoke. The latter emigrated from England in 
1830, and remained in the United States about ten years, subsequently in 
March, 1840, coming to Canada. He purchased the farm in this township 
on which his sons George and Arthur now reside. Samuel R., the subject 
of this sketch, was born in 1840 and from his youth upward followed farm- 
ing. He married in 1876 Amelia Ann Musson, by whom he has a family 
of two children. 


-I
-- ,. 
o 
.:
 
 




TOWNSHIP OF SCARBORO'. 




1

1 


TO\VNSHIP OF SCARBORO'. 


EREMIAH ANNIS, lot 16, concession D, is the son of Levi and 
Rhoda Annis, of English extraction, who emigrated from the 
United States to Canada in 1793, where he purchased land in 
Scarboro' Township, on which he remained until his death in 
1855. He also owned about four hundred and fifty acres in 
Darlington Township, Durham County, which eventually became 
the property of his sons. Jeremiah has always lived on the old 
homestead, but he has done a good business in buying and selling farms to 
advantage. He belongs to the Methodist persuasion, and is highly respected 
in his immediate neighbourhood. He married Jane, daughter of William 
Fawcett of this township, by whom he has three SO!lS and three daughters. 
He is a Justice of the Peace, the only office he has accepted amongst the 
many offered to him. 



 
f.' 
ÌJ'J I 
t, 

:' 


THOMAS BROWN, lot 29, concession B, is the son of John and Margaret 
(Smith) Brown, natives of Scotland. He was born in Scotland in 1806, 
and emigrated to Canada in 1830, settling on the lot where he still continues 
to reside. Like others of the early settlers, toil and hardship were for many 
years his portion, but by industry and skill he has succeeded in producing 
from almost impenetrable bush as neat and compact a farm as any to be 
found in the township; and now, in his declining years in the society of the 
members of his family, he enjoys the quiet contentment vouchsafed to him 
by his laborious past. He has figured conspicuously in connection with 
the management of the municipality, having been a member of the Council 
upwards of twenty years, being Deputy-Reeve and Reeve a considerable 
part of that time. He was appointed J.P., and for several years acted in 
that capacity, but early retired from the Bench, as he says, " to give place 
to younger men." He married in 1835 Miss Mary Tackett, by whom he 
had ten children, seven only are now living. His eldest son, J obn, is now 
owner of the farm; another son Robert lives on the lot adjoining. Mr. 
Brown is a Conservative in politics, and in religion a Presbyterian. 



27 0 


Biographical Notices. 


\VALTER GLENDINNING, lot 29, concession I, is the youngest son of 
Archibald and Jane Glendinning. His father and family emigrated from 
Dumfriesshire, Scotland, in 1820, and settled on lot 28, concession I. Archi- 
bald married after he came to Canada; his family consisted of three sons 
and five daughters, viz.: Elizabeth, Isabella, Archibald (dead), Margaret, 
Janet, Robert, Walter and Jane. Mr. Glendinning, sen'r, kept the first 
store in the township, near Ellesmere, and was also postmaster, the latter 
position being now in the possession of \Valter. He was a ::\Iajor in the 
militia, and was at the head of his company during the Y onge Street 
skirmish in 1837; his military suit and sword are yet preserved as relics by 
the family. He was one of the first Councillors on the old District Council 
and was also Secretary of the Scarboro' School Commissioners, and 
retained that office several years. He was also Assessor and Collector of 
the :\lunicipality for a lengthened period. Although principally engaged in 
mercantile pursuits, he and his brother \Villiam farmed at one time four 
hundred acres of land. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. He 
died on May 29, 1883, after a long and industrious life, leaviDg behind him 
a fine property and, what is still better, a respected and honoured name. 
\Valter (whose name heads this sketch) married Isabella, daughter of John 
Robertson, a descendant of an old pioneer of Simcoe County, by whom he 
had six children, one sop and five daughters. Like his father he is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and a moderate Conservative in politics. 


\VALTER J. GLENDINNING, lot 29, concession 2, is the son of James and 
Elizabeth (vVilkinson) Glendinning, who came from Dumfriesshire, Scot- 
land, at an early date, and settled in Sr.arboro', where the father died some 
years ago. The family left behind consisted of four sons and one daughter, 
viz.: Francis, \Valter J., Charles and John; the daughter married J. G. 
Thompson of this township. The subject of this sketch was born March 
3, 18 3 6 , and early in life learned the trade of carpenter, which he follows 
at the present time. He belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and in 
politics is a Liberal Conservative. 


\VILLIAM HELLIWELL, lots 7 and 8, concession I, is a son of Thomas 
Helliwell who emigrated from Yorkshire, England, in 1818, and settled in 
Toronto, where he established a brewery, carrying on that business until his 
death in 1825. The business was afterwards carried on by his sons Thomas 
and John until 1832, when \Villiam (the subject of this sketch) and Joseph 
(another brother) became partners. John died in 1828, leaving two sons, 
viz.: Thomas, who was manager of the Bank of Upper Canada at St. 



" 


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Township of Scarboro'. 


27 1 


Catharines for many years, and John who is a commission merchant. In 
18 47 the premises comprising the brewery, distillery, grist mills and dwel- 
ling were burnt down, and the partnership was dissolved, William removing 
to Highland Creek, where he built a grist mill, which he operated until 
1880, when it was burned. He then turned his attention to farming, and 
has since continued in that branch of industry. He was appointed J.P. in 
18 47, and was for many years a member of the Township Council. He now 
holds the office of Overseer of Fisheries under the Dominion Government. 
He is a Conservative in politics, and in religion a member of the Episcopal 
Church. Mr. Helliwell married first a daughter of Thomas Bright, who 
died in 1843, leaving two sons and four daughters. He married a second 
time another of Mr. Bright's daughters, by whom he has a large family, 
six sons and five daughters. He has one son (Frank) in the employment of 
P. Burns, coal and wood merchant, Toronto, and one (Horatio) in the Inland 
Revenue Department. Mr. Helliwell was formerly a captain in the militia, 
and was out with his company during the troubles of 1837-'38. 


\VILLIAM HERON, deceased, was born in York County, near Toronto, 
in 1806. His father was a pioneer of this section, and passed through the 
troublous times of 1812. William married in 1832 Hannah, daughter of 
George Skelding, also a York pioneer, and settled on lot 9, concession D, 
Township of Scarboro', where he lived until about two years before his 
death which occurred October 25, 1883, at his residence in Scarboro' 
Village, where Mrs. Heron and two daughters still live. He left a family 
of four sons and five daughters, viz.: Samuel, George, William, Andrew, 
John, Ann Moore, Lucy Stephenson, Jane vVestney, Elizabeth and Sarah. 
Each of the former received a farm, and the remainder of the family were 
left in good circumstances. Mrs. Heron is still living on the family home- 
stead with two daughters, and is very much respected. The sons are 
Reformers in politics; two members of the family are Presbyterians, the 
rest are Methodists. Mr. and Mrs. Heron celebrated their golden wedding 
January 25, 1882, surrounded by their family and friends. 


JOHN HOLMES, lot 26, concession 2, blacksmith, is the second son of 
Alexander Holmes, a native of Roxburghshire, Scotland. He came to 
Canada in 1830 and remained three years in Montreal, subsequently coming 
to York County and settling on his present lot. In addition to his trade he 
has twenty-five acres of land which he cultivates, and his dwelling and 
surroundings, on which he evidently expends much labour, are replete with 
beauty and comfort. At the time of the Mackenzie Rebellion Mr. Holmes 



27 2 


Biographical .J.Votices. 


shouldered his musket in defence of law and order, and was on guard at 
Government House at the time of the Y onge Street skirmish. He is in 
politics a Reformer, and a devoted and consistent member of the Presby- 
terian Church. He married Miss Margaret \Vilson, of Berwickshire, Scot- 
land, by whom he had twelve children; two only are now living, one son 
and one daughter, the latter living at home with her parents. 


\VILLIAM H. HOUGH, carriage builder, is the son of Henry and Mary 
(Colbetle) Hough. His father is a descendant of one of the Scarboro' 
pioneers; his grandfather fought under General Brock, at Queenston 
Heights, where he was wounded, and afterwards received a pension. The 
father, Henry Hough, followed farming until twenty-four years of age when 
he commenced the manufacture of c?-rriages, which he continued until 1881
 
when \Villiam H. took charge of the business. In addition to carriage- 
making he carries on a blacksmith's shop also; and by close application to 
every detail in his business and the employment of the best workmen he is 
on his road to prosperity. He belongs to the Methodist Church, and is a 
Liberal in politics. 


lAMES HUMPHREY, lot 16, concession D, is the son of \Villiam and 
Elizabeth Humphrey, and was born in the County of Tyrone, Ireland. 
His father was of English descent, his mother being from Scotland. lames 
married, before he left Ireland, Margaret, daughter of James Richardson, of 
Derry, the latter coming with our subject to Canada in 1824. They came 
direct to York County and settled in Scarboro' Township, and purchased 
three hundred acres of Clergy Reserve Land. 1'1r. Humphrey has been 
very successful and has been able to be of great assistance to his family. 
He is in religion a consistent and devoted adherent of the Church of Eng- 
land. His wife died in 1868, leaving a family of ten children. He has 
one son, Richardson, who lives at home on the farm. 


THOMAS KENNEDY, lot 28, concession 2, is the son of Samuel and 
Eleanor Kennedy. His father came to Canada in 1800, and was engaged 
in making roads and farming until 1838, when he removed to Ohio, U.S., 
and remained there until his death in 1861. He had five sons and one 
daughter, and to each of the sons who remained in Canada he gave a good 
farm. Thomas Kennedy was born in Scarboro' Township, October II, 
181 4, and has always been a resident of this section. He married Jane, 
daughter of Alexander l\Iontgomery, a pioneer of this section, by whom he 
had the following children: Rebecca, born December 7, 1839; Eleanor, 



Townskip of Scarboro'. 


273 


born February 28, 1842; Lyman, born May 28, 1844; Elizabeth, born 
March 29, 18 4 6 ; Henry, born August 20, 1849 ; John W., born May 3 1 , 
18 5 2 ; Thomas, born April 5, r854; Maria, born August 16, 1856; William 
Andrew, born August 18, 1858; Alfred E., born September 21, 1860, and 
l\Iary Ann, born February 27, 1864, the latter being the only one now at 
home. Mr. Kennedy received from his father sixty-five acres of land, 
uncleared; that his success in life has been marked may be taken for 
granted, he being in possession of five hundred acres. He is a Liberal in 
politics, and in religion a member of the Presbyterian Church. One of the 
sons, Alfred E., is a druggist in Toronto; John W. is a merchant of Agin- 
court and very prosperous. 


JOHN McINTOSH, deceased, was a native of Perthshire, Scotland; he 
emigrated to Canada in 1801 and settled in York County, where he died in 
18 3 0 , at the age of seventy-seven years. He left a family of eleven children; 
he and his son John fought side by side in the defence of little York in 
1812 and at the capitulation were both taken prisoners. His son John 
married a sister of Mrs. William Lyon Mackenzie, and was in the Legisla- 
ture at the same time as the husband of the latter. Mrs. Elliot, a daughter 
of John McIntosh, sen'r, was born in Toronto, December 14, 1805, and 
married in 182 7 Thomas Elliot, who died in December 21, 1880. Mrs. 
Elliot is now living in comfortable retirement at Highland Creek, and is 
much respected for her benevolent and consistent Christian spirit. 


MARSHALL MACKLIN, lot 24, concession 4, is the son of Daniel and 
Martha (Marshall) Macklin, who in consequence of the persecution under 
which they, as members of the Old Kirk of Scotland, suffered, took up their 
residence in the North of Ireland, where they remained until their death. 
Marshall emigrated to Canada in 1827, settled in Scarboro', and purchased 
two hundred acres of land from the Canada Company, afterwards adding to 
his original lot until he had five hundred acres, which he has divided 
among his sons. He married in 1837 Mary Jackson, by whom he had 
seventeen children, seven sons and six daughters of whom are living. 
Some of the family are settled in Michigan, U.S.; the eldest son, Marshall, 
is a physician practising in Manitoba; the others are living on or in the 
neighbourhood of the old homestead. Mr. Macklin has been very success- 
ful, and has accumulated wealth, and now in the autumn of life, after many 
years of laborious anxiety, enjoys in quiet and content the ease afforded 
JÜm. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics belongs 
to the Reform Party. 
19 



274 


Biographical Notices. 


SIMON MILLER, lot 28, concession 4, Scarboro', is the eldest son of Henry 
l\Iiller, whose father came to York from PennsylvanIa, U.S., in April, 1793, 
and soon after settled on lot 34, concession I, 1\larkham Township, where 
Henry Miller was born in November, 1797, and remained until his death, F eb- 
ruary 29, 18 8 4. He left a family of five children, Simon, Nicholas, Henry, 
NancyJane, wifeof\Villiam Gown; and Andrew. Henry Miller, sen'r, was a 
member of the Home District Council from Markham Township, and was 
also appointed Coroner and Issuer of Marriage Licenses in 18 53. He was 
once offered the representation of East York in the Dominion Parliament, 
but refused the honour. Simon, the subject of this sketch, married a 
daughter of \Villiam Munshaw, of Markham Township; his family consists 
of two sons and four daughters. 1\1r. Miller is a Justice of the Peace, and 
was a member of the Township Council for six years. 


\V. J. MITCHELL, J.P., lot 22, concession 5, is descended from an Irish 
family who remained true to the Crown during the Rebellion of 179 8 . His 
father, James Mitchell, who was born in 1783, in after life often related 
many of the stirring scenes of which he was an eye-witness during that 
memorable period, one in particular, the setting on fire of his father's house 
by the United Irishmen. The family trace their ancestry back to a more 
remote date, their name being mentioned by Mackenzie in his narrative of 
the famous siege of Derry, on the side of the defenders. The subject of 
this notice is the son of James and Sarah 
litchell, who emigrated from 
Londonderry to Canada in 1842, and settled on lot 22, concession 5, 
Scarboro' Township, where the father died on April I, 188 3, in his 
hundredth year. He now lives on the old homestead, and although often 
solicited to accept municipal honours has always declined. The only 
office he holds is that of Magistrate and Commissioner in Queen's Bench, 
the duties of which he discharges with care and ability, there not having 
been any appeal against his decisions for the quarter of a century in which 
he has held office. He married a daughter of James Baird, of Donegal, 
Ireland, a very prominent family in that part of the country, an uncle of 
1\1r. Baird's having been an intimate friend and subordinate officer of Lord 
Nelson, viz.: Surgeon on board the flag ship Victory. 


JAMES PALMER, lot 31, concession B, is the son of James and Sarah 
Palmer who came from the State of New York in 1797, and settled first at 
Kingston, from which place they went to Cobourg, subsequently coming 
to York and settling in the Township of Scarboro', on lot 22, concession D'i!{ 
where the father remained until his death in 18 3 6 . James, our subject, 



TOW1lship of Scarboro'. 


275 


was born at Stone Mills, Bay of Quinté, Prince Edward County in 1797, 
and remained with his parents until he was twenty-five years of age, when 
he purchased the lot on -which he now lives. He has been through life a 
very industrious man, and has also been successful, the neatness of his 
farm and the substantial erections thereon bearing ample testimony. He 
served in the \Var of 1812, for which he drew a pension. He has been a 
member of the Municipal Council for some years. In politics he is a 
Reformer, and in religion a Methodist; a consistent Christian, he has earned 
the respect of all who know him. Mr. Palmer married Mary Anne, daughter 
of Nathaniel Hastings, of Toronto, who died in 1876. 


JAMES PATTON, lot 28, concession C, is the second son of George 
and Elizabeth (Brock) Patton, natives of Lanarkshire, Scotland, who came 
to Canada in 1833, and settled in Scarboro' Township. Our subject has 
been considered one of the best farmers in this section, and the services 
rendered by him to the rising community recently took the form of a valu- 
able testimonial consisting of a beautifully framed illuminated address, 
together with a purse of $ I 50. The following is a copy of the address: 
James Patton, Esq., of Scarboro': 
DEAR SIR,- W e, the undersigned, desire to express our appreciation 
of the valuable services YOll- have rendered, in your successful endeavours 
to advance the interests of prize ploughing in Canada; you have always 
occupied a prominent position among the ploughmen of this country, and 
although during later years, you have not been a competitor, yet the interest 
you have manifested has been of the liveliest nature. To your untiring 
zeal and kind instructions many of us owe our success in the field, while 
your friendly and gentlemanly manner at all times has endeared you to us 
all. This is a slight token of the high esteem in which you are held 
by your many friends; we would ask your acceptance of the accompanying 
testimonial, and at the same time we trust the good feeling which has 
always existed between us in the past, may continue in the future. \Ve 
would also express our regard for your estimable wife, Mrs. Patton, and 
hope she may long be spared togetller with yourself, to enjoy the blessings 
of this life, and be rewarded with eternal happiness in the life which is to 
come. Committee on behalf of the contributors: \Villiam Hood, Andrew 
Hood, \V. Rennie, S. Rennie, Dougald McLean, John Gibson, George 
Morgan, vVilliam Milliken, John L. Gibson, Alfred Moson, J olm Little, 
Alexander Doherty, Andrew Young, sen'r; James McCowan, Hugh Clark, 
James \Veir, John Torrance, John Crawford. 
SCARBORO', June 17, 1884. 


ADNA PHERRILL lives on his farm of one hundred acres, being lot 25, 
concession B. He is a son of the late Stephen Pherrill, a native of St. 
John, N.B., who came to Canada in 1805, and settled in Scarboro' Town- 



27 6 


Biographical Notzces. 


ship. He fought in the \Var of 1812, and also during the Rebellion of 18 37, 
in which he held a captaincy. Adna Pherrill, the subject of this sketch, 
was born in this township in 1816, and lived on the old homestead until he 
reached man's estate, when his father presented him with thirty acres of 
land wherewith to commence life. He afterwards purchased his present 
one-hundred-acre farm in Scarboro', for which he paid $20 per acre. He 
also acquired thirty-two acres in the township. He has been very successful 
in buying and selling farms and city property. He purchased one hundred 
acres at \Vidder, Bosanquet Township, Lambton County, which-being 
required for town lots-turned out a very profitable investment; he after- 
wards bought three farms in Chatham, where two of his sons and his eldest 
daughter now reside; he also purchased a fine residence in Leslieville, 
before it became part of the City of Toronto (for which piece of property 
he has been offered three times what it originally cost him). Mr. Pherrill 
attributes his success to the fine example set him by his honoured father, 
and never forgot a maxim laid down by him" My son, be honest and earnest 
in whatever you do." He had a brother who was lieutenant in the Rebellion 
of 1837-38. In 1838 he married Miss Stewart, daughter of Captain \i\Tilliam 
Stewart, by whom he has seven children living, viz.: \Villiam, Russell, 
Stewart, Tilmer, Elizabeth, Mary Hester and Helen. Having, by nearly fifty 
years of industry and hard work, amassed a considerable fortune, he retired 
in 1875 to. enjoy the ease and comfort to which his past life entitles him. 


STEPHEN PHERRILL, deceased, was descended from a family who came 
from the State of l\laine, U.S., and settled in New Brunswick at the close 
of the Revolutionary \Var. He remained with his parents for several years, 
and while in N
w Brunswick married Elizabeth, daughter of Colonel Jacob 
Russell, of that Province, by whom he had six children, as follow: Amy, 
Sarah. Eliza, Mary, Stephen and David. During the \\Tar of 1812 he was 
engaged carrying despatches for Government, and after the war was over 
settled on lot 24, concession B, Scarboro' Township, where he lived until 
his death in April, 1842. He left about one thousand five hundred acres to 
divide among his family. \Villiam Pherrill, son of the above, lives on the 
old homestead. He married Charlotte Boulton, daughter of Captain 
Edward Boulton, by whom he had eleven children, seven of whom are 
living; all married with one exception, a daughter who remains at home. 
1\1r. Pherrill held a captain's commission, and was present at the battle on 
Y onge Street during the Rebellion of 1837-'38. David J. Pherrill, son of 
Stephen Pherrill, deceased, lives on the old homestead. He married 
Hannah, daughter of Archibald Thompson, by whom he has five children. 



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Township of Scarboro'. 


277 


SIMPSON RENNIE, J.P., lot 30, concession 5, is the third son of Robert 
and Eliza (Fife) Rennie. His parents came from Scotland in IR33, and 
soon after settling in Scarboro' purchased the lot on which Simpson now 
resides. Mr. Rennie, sen'r, has long ago retired from active work, and now 
lives in ease and retirement in the City of Toronto. Simpson Rennie has 
had the entire management of his present farm for over twenty years, and 
during that time has made considerable improvements. He obtained the 
gold medal awarded by the Ontario Agricultural and Arts Association for 
the best managed farm in group No. 4, comprising the following electoral 
districts: Peel, Cardwell, York East, York North, York \Vest, Simcoe 
\Vest, Simcoe East, Simcoe South, Algoma, Muskoka, Ontario North, 
Ontario South, Durham East, Durham \Vest. \Ve need scarcely add that 
the Association's award is to Mr. Rennie a source of considerable pride. 
Mr. Rennie married Isabella, daughter of vVilliam Hood, Esq., Markham, a 
sketch of whose life appears elsewhere. The fruit of this union is four 
children, viz.: Elizabeth, married to J. \V. Sanderson; Robert, William 
and James. The family belong to the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Rennie 
is a Reformer in politics. 


GEORGE TAYLOR, lot 26, concession C, was born in England, June 5, 
181 7. His father, Richard Taylor, was born in 1776, and was a gardener 
by professio,n. His mother's maiden name was Fanny Burke. Their 
family consisted of five children, viz.: George (the subject of this sketch), 
James, _\ndrew, Mary and Nancy. Mr. Taylor, sen'r, emigrated to Canada 
in 1819, and after remaining in Nova Scotia for one year came forward to 
little York, thence to Scarboro' Township, where he purchased a farm on 
the Don and Danforth Road for the sum of $500, on which he erected a log 
house, and commenced the work of clearing. He had to put up with all 
the inconveniences and hardships incidental to pioneer life, but by dint of 
perseverance and energy he soon had a comfortable home in which to bring 
up his family. As years passed by, his successes multiplied, and would no 
doubt have further increased had not death, the stern monitor, cut short 
his career in the year 1834. His life was a noble and industrious one, and 
a fine example for his descendants. George Taylor was educated in 
Scarboro' Township, and early assisted his father in clearing the farm, and 
on the death of the latter received the same by paying off the other mem- 
bers of the family. \Vhen twenty-five years of age he married l\Irs. Stevens, 
of Scarboro'; the result of this marriage was five children, three sons and 
two daughters, viz.: Abigail, born July 26, 1843; George, born January 
20, 18+5; Ruth, born September 8, 1846; \Villiam, born September II, 



27 8 


Biographical Notices. 


18+8; Sarah Melissa, born June 7, 1852. The mother died on June 17, 
1882. 1\Ir. Taylor has earned among his neighbours a reputation for 
integrity rarely equalled; his industrious habits, descended to him from 
his father, brought with them that success which is generally the lot of 
application, and although now enjoying his well-earned ease, his habitual 
liking for work finds vent in cultivating the well-laid-out garden surround- 
ing his house. 


DAYID A. THO:\-IPSON, lot 26, concession I, is the youngest son of the 
late Archibald D. Thompson, a descendant of the late Andrew Thompson, 
mentioned elsewhere. His father died in 1877; his mother is still living. 
The family consisted of six children. David, to whom was left the old 
homestead and the care of his mother, married Margaret Patterson, who 
died in 1875, by whom he had the following children, Janet, :\Iary, Archi- 
balJ, David and Isabella. :\Ir. Thompson is an industrious, upright man, 
and respected by all for his integrity and high principle. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and a Liberal Conservative in politics. 


DAVID THOMPSON, deceased, was the first settler in the Township of 
Scarboro', locating there in the year 1796. He and his wife were of Scotch 
birth, being from \Vester-kirk, Dumfries. He died on June 22, 1834, and 
his wife died November 8, 1847; the latter was eighty years of age, and 
left behind her over one hundred descendants. Mr. Thompson was a stone- 
mason by trade, and assisted in the building of the first light-house in 
Toronto Bay. He also fought in the \Var of 1812. 


FRA
CIS THOMPSON, lot 34, concession C, is the youngest son of \Villiam 
and Mary Thompson, who came from County Tyrone, Ireland, about the 
year 1802. His parents remained in the United States eleven years, after 
which time they came to Little York, and settled east of the Don, removing 
afterwards to Scarboro' Township, and settling on lot 34, concession C, 
where he remained until his death. Francis was brought up on his father's 
farm and assisted in clearing off the bush and became possessed of the 
homestead by purchase afterwards. He has been very successful, and 
has been able to fairly start his sons in life and retire himself from active 
labour. He married Hellen, eldest daughter of John \Valton, by whom he 
had five children, \Villiam \Vallace, Mary, David \Valton, Hannah Janet, 
and Hellen Isabella; the latter lives at home with her parents. Although 
often solicited to accept municipal honours he has always declined. He is 
a staunch Conservative in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. 



Township of Scarboro'. 


279 


CHRISTOPHER THOMSON, lot 34, concession 2, is the youngest son of 
Christopher and Mary Thomson. His father, who was born In Dumfries- 
shire, Scotland, August 31, 1796, was one of the first settlers in this town- 
ship, and during his lifetime occupied a prominent position, having filled 
for many years the office of Councillor and other places of public trust in 
the municipality. His mother, Mary Thomson, was born in York, Upper 
Canada, l\Iay 14, 1800. His parents were married March 17, 1820, at Scar- 
boro', by the Rev. \V. Jenkins. Their family consisted of nine sons and 
four daughters, none of whom died under forty years of age. The mother, 
Mary Thomson, died December 14, 1876, and the father, Christopher, died 
December 13, 1879' On the occasion of each funeral six sons acted as pall 
bearers, and bore to their last resting-place the remains of their deceased 
parents, an occurrence rarely seen. Mr. Thomson, sen'r, was a consistent 
and devoted adherent of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics supported 
the Reform Party. Christopher, the youngest son, was born February 23, 
1843, and has always remained on the old homestead, which in company 
with his brother John, he continues to cultivate. He is a firm supporter of 
the Presbyterian Church, and in politics casts his vote for the Reform 
Party. Both his brother and himself are much respected in this section. 


JAMES A. THOMSON, deceased, lot 23, concession I, was the youngest son 
of Andrew and Jane Thomson, who emigrated from Dumfries, Scotland, in 
179 6 , and after remaining five years in little York, removed to Scarboro' 
Township, and settled on lot 23, concession I. Andrew Thomson served 
during the \Var of 1812, and was taken prisoner by the Americans at the 
capitulation of York. Connected as he was with the early history of this 
township, we shall only be doing justice to his memory by briefly alluding 
to the evident signs of progress made in this section during the early days 
of settlement with which he was closely associated. The fit'st school-house 
erected in Scarboro' was situated on the corner of this lot, and the first 
church, a frame building, belonging to the Presbyterian body, was built in 
181 9, to which Mr. Thomson, sen'r, gave considerable assistance. The 
old gentleman died at the age of seventy-one years, leaving behind him a 
name revered by his posterity. He was twice married. By his first wife 
he had two children, viz.: John and Elizabeth; by his second marriage he 
had Margaret, Andrew, Janet, \Villiam, Mary Ellen, and James A., whose 
name heads this sketch. The latter was born on the old homestead, part 
of which he afterwards owned, March 20, 1802, and it is stated he was the 
first white child born in Scarboro' Township. Mr. Thomson was essen- 
tiallya self-made man. Brought up to agriculture, he did not neglect the 



280 


BiograpJtical 6Yotices. 


more ornamental, yet necessarily useful duties that relate to self-improve- 
ment, and toiled early and late to acquire such knowledge as would prove 
advantageous to him in after life. He was appointed a Justice of the 
Peace, but always declined to act. He was frequently solicIted to act as 
Councillor, and in other municipal offices, but the offers were all courteously 
declined. In politics l\Ir. Thomson was a staunch Reformer, but insisted 
strongly on the maintenance of the British connection with its attendant insti- 
tutions. He was appointed an Elder of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 
Scarboro', in 1844, during the ministry of Dr. George; and it was in a great 
measure due to his influence that the site for the present beautiful structure 
at Bendale was selected, for the erection of which he contributed a hand- 
some sum. Following the example of parents, who during their life-time 
were eminent for their zeal and piety, he indeed merited the confidence of 
the surrounding neighbours, and embraced every opportunity by which, 
through his assistance, the cause of religion might be advanced. He was a 
man of rare intelligence, and one who discharged the duties of elder with 
great faithfulness and efficiency for over forty-four years. Mr. Thomson 
was twice married. His first wife was a daughter of Thomas Patterson, of 
this township, by whom he had eleven children. There was no issue by 
his second marriage. He died on October 28, 1884. 


JOHN TINGLE, jun'r, merchant and post-master, \\,Texford, is the son of 
John and Ellen (Thompson) Tingle, and was born in 1837 in this township, 
in which he has always been a resident. He commenced in the mercantile 
line in 1865, and has been very successful. His father emigrated to Canada 
in 1818. He was a Reformer in politics, and a Presbyterian in religion. 
Our subject married in 1869 Eliza, daughter of Timothy Devenish, of this 
township, by whom he had two children, Mary Ellen and Emily. 1\1r. 
Tingle, like his father, is a strong Reformer, and a consistent member of the 
Presbyterian Church. 


THOMAS \VALTON, deceased, a descendant of one of the pioneers ot 
Scarboro', was born in this township, January 12, 1828. He died April 17, 
1876, leaving a widow and a family of seven children. His wife's maiden 
name was Fanny Scott; she came from Cumberland, England. :\hs. 
Walton resides on the old homestead in company with the following sons 
and daughter: \Villiam Albert, Thomas A., Francis E. and Alice. Two 
daughters are married, Lavinia to \Villiam Brown, of Markham, and :Mary 
to Charles Scrivens, of Buffalo. John \Vallis, the second son, married a 
Miss Brown, of this township. The family is one highly respected in the 
neighbourhood; they are members of the :Methodist Church. 



. Tow1lship of Scarboro'. 


281 


JOHN P. WHELER, deceased, was born in England In 1810; he emi- 
grated to Canada in 1829 and settled in the Township of Scarboro' in the 
following year, on lot 21, concession D, where he operated a saw-mill, 
subsequently erecting a flour-mill, which was destroyed by fire in 1863. 
:vir. \Vheler took a prominent and active part in the affairs of the munici- 
pality, and was elected Councillor when the Board was organized, accepting 
the honour of Deputy-Reeve for the first year and serving in the Reeve's 
chair for the succeeding twenty years. He was \'1 arden of the County of 
York three years and was elected first President of the East York Agricul- 
tural Society, and also occupied for a number of years corresponding 
positions in the Scarboro' and Provincial Agricultural Societies. He was 
appointed License Inspector for East York under the Crooks Act, which 
office he held until the time of his death in August, 1883. l\Ir. \Vheler was 
a strong Reformer in politics, and took a lively and intelligent interest in all 
measures likely to benefit the country at large. 


THOMAS \VHITESIDE, lot 29, concession 2, is the son of Thomas and 
Sarah C
lurdock) \Vhiteside. His father was born in County Antrim, 
Ireland, in 1772, and came to Canada in 1821, settling in Scarboro' Town- 
ship on the lot now occupied by our subject, a year later. He died in 
18 7 0 . He was a strong Conservative in politics, and, in company with 
two of his sons, took a prominent part in suppressing the Rebellion of 18 37. 
He was in religion a Presbyterian, and always bore a good character among 
his neighbours. He left a family of seven children-Margaret, Jane, James, 
Daniel, Sarah, Thomas and John. Thomas \Vhiteside, jun'r, was born in 
182 7 in the old log house, which is still to be seen from the windows of his 
present residence. He married Miss Jane McCowan, a native of Scotland, 
by whom he has six children, viz.: Thomas, \Villiam J., Margaret P., Janet 
G., David and John H. Mr. \Vhiteside served in the Township Council 
four years. He takes an active part in agricultural matters, and is a 
member both of East York and Scarboro' Societies. He is also a member 
of the York Pioneers. In politics he votes Conservative, and in religion is 
a worthy member of the Presbyterian body, from which he never withholds 
substantial support. 


ARCHIBALD \VRIGHT, deceased, a pioneer of Scarboro'Township and a 
native of the Highlands of Scotland, emigrated to America at an early day 
and settled in New Brunswick, where he remained until the year 180 9. 
He came to Canada and settled in Scarboro' Township on the lot now 
occupied by his grandson, John \Vright. He afterwards removed to Whitby 



282 


Biographical Notices. 


with his wife and one son, where he died on June 18,,1837. His wife died 
on November 13, r855. He left behind him a family of five sons and four 
daughters, together with considerable property-about five hundred acres. 
He was a worthy member of the Presbyterian Church, and in political con- 
victions a strong Reformer. Hulet \Vright, son of the above, residing with 
his son John on lot 35, concession 4, having in early life to put up with the 
discomforts and hardships attendant to pioneer life, it is scarcely necessary 
to add that he had little or no education, in lieu of which he had the example 
of perseverance and energy, combined with a strong religious belief received 
from his parents. He has been very successful in life, and now, at the 
advanced age of eighty-eight, surrounded by his grandchildren, he enjoys 
that ease and comfort, earned through years of toil, to which he is certainly 
entitled. In politics he is a Reformer. John \Vright, lot 35, concession 4, 
son of the above, was born in Scarboro' Township in 1833 and has always 
lived at home on the old homestead. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church, and in politics a staunch Reformer. 



-'" 
e;2 



 '" 


.:.. 



TOWNSHIP OF MARKHAM. 




TOWNSHIP OF 1\IARKHAM. 


I "---- 
"','J) 

 '\ (ILLIAM ARMSTRONG, lot 10, concession 10, is the eldest 
i ' It . \_ t son living of Captain William Armstrong, who e.migrated to 

. 
 
J the United States in 1817. Mr. Armstrong remained in 
.:'
 
V:"i. New York about two years, and then removed to Montreal, 
, ,,:. - where he stayed until 1824, in which year he came to 
-- Toronto. He soon afterwards settled in Markham Town- 
ship on lot 10, concession 8, one log house at that time com- 
prising what is now the Village of Markham. In the year 1832 he married 
Esther, daughter of Peter Reesor. For many years he kept the Wellington 
Hotel in the township, which he carried on in connection with his farming. 
He took a lively interest in agriculture; and many others, stimulated by 
his example, were prevailed upon to give their full support to the exhibitions. 
He also held a captain's commission in the militia. He was a member of 
the English Church, it having been partly through Captain Armstrong's 
instrumentality that the services of the Church of England were procured 
for Markham. Captain Armstrong lived to a good old age, honoured and 
respected by all his neighbours, by whom his memory is still cherished and 
his virtues emulated. William, his son, has a very fine property and has 
taken great interest in all agricultural matters. He is energetic and enter- 
prising, and allows no opportunity to pass whereby the advancement of the 
township may be secured. 
WILLIAM JAMES BEATON, blacksmith, was born in the Township of 
Pickering, Ontario County, in 1859. His father was born in Scotland in 
1800, and came to Canada at an early day, and has occupied the position 
of Township Clerk and Treasurer of Pickering for upwards of forty years. 
William James is one of a family of five children; he learned the trade of 
blacksmith with Ivh. William Mosgrove, of Brougham, and has since 
carried on that business in Markham. He was married in 1882 to Miss 
Minnie Woodruff. 



286 


Biol(raphical Notices. 


JOH
 N. BUTTON, lot 15, concession 4, is the second son of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Francis Button, who located in Markham about 1798 with his 
father, :l\Iajor John Button, who raised a troop of cavalry and fought in 
defence of his country during the \Yar of 1812. The subject of this notice 
was born on the old homestead, and at the age of sixteen repaired to :l\Iark- 
ham Village, where he learned the trade of blacksmith, which business he 
followed for several years. He has of late years, however, confined himself 
mostly to farming. He married Miss Barr, by whom he had one daughter, 
now the wife of Major James Elliott, who resides on the home farm. Mr. 
Button is one of the oldest Canadian J.P.'s in the township. He formerly 
held a commission in the British cavalry. He is a member of the Metho- 
dist Church, and has been liberal in his donations for schools and other 
necessary institutions in the township. His eldest grandson, Robert Button 
Elliott, is a member of the old troop, and is Sergeant-Major of the Second 
Regiment of Cavalry; his youngest grandson, \Villiam Asa Elliott, is with 
him on the old farm. 


NEWBURY BUTTON, lot 35, concession 7, is the son of Francis Button, 
mentioned elsewhere. He was born at Buttonville Village in 1825, and 
remained with his parents until he was twenty-five years of age. He 
married a daughter of \Villiam Reynolds, by whom he has two children 
living. His wife died in 1857. He married again, his second wife being 
Catharine Bartholomew, of this township, by whom he had two sons. 
Both himself and his sons take an active interest in military matters. 


CHRISTOPHER H. CHANT, lot 12, concession 5, is the youngest but one 
in a family of nine children born 
 to Christopher and Jane Chant. His 
father emigrated from Somersetshire, England, and settled in Brockville in 
1841. Three years later he removed with his family to Niagara, and while 
there the subject of this sketch was sent to St. Catharines to learn the 
trade of cabinet maker. He eventually settled in Unionville, Markham 
Township, where he married a daughter of Robert Croft, and has now a 
grown-up family. He follows his calling of cabinet maker, and is every- 
where noted as being extremely skilful in his business. One of his sons 
follows the same trade. He has one son Station Agent on the Midland 
Railroad, and his youngest son is teaching school at Maxwell, having 
matriculated at Toronto University with first-class honors in Mathematics 
and English. Mr. Chant also conducts an undertaking business and has 
a first-class hearse of his own making. 



TO'Zl!Jlshzþ of lIfarkham. 


28 7 


DAVID CLARK, proprietor of Queen's Hotel, Thornhill, is a native OI 
Scotland, and came to Canada in 1872. For some time he carried on a 
bottling business in Toronto, and afterwards kept the Manitoba House. In 
r882 he bought and took possession of the above named pretty popular 
hotel, where he has every accommodation for the travelling public. 


'Y. D. CROSBY, lot 8, concession 7, is the son of C. Crosby, who, coming 
from the State of New York, located with his parents in Markham in the 
year 1812, the family settling on the farm now occupied by the subject of 
this sketch. His father married Mary, daughter of Michael Miller, a 
pioneer of Markham. by whom he had the following children: Jeminia (now 
the wife of Dr. Doherty), H. P., Ellen, 1. G., 'V. D. (our subject), James S. 
and H. A. 'Y. D. Crosby was born on the old homestead and assisted to 
clear the farm, and since he has been in possession has shown himself 
energetic and successful, and bears a good character among his neighbours. 
He is a Reformer in politics, and a consistent follower of the Methodist 
Church. He married in 1860 Jane Mulholland, by whom he has a family 
of eight chiJdren. 


SAMUEL S. CUMNER, lot 4, concession 3, Township of Markham, is the 
youngest son of David and _\bigail Cumner, being a descendant of a 
family who originally came from Pennsylvania, and settled in York County 
at an early day. His father was born in 1803, and his mother in 1797, and 
the family consisted of eight children, six of whom are yet living. Samuel 
has always lived on the old homestead; he married l\1iss Sarah Toppin, by 
whom he had five children; he has one daughter at home keeping house 
for him. l\1r. Cumner in religion is a Methodist, and is everywhere looked 
upon as an upright, earnest and consistent Christian; he is always ready 
to assist in Sunday school work, and has been superintendent for the same 
some years. He is one who has never sought office, preferring rather to 
remain in private life and watch over the education of his children. 


ANDREW ECKARDT is the sixth son of Philip Eckardt, who came to 
Canada in 179 0 . His father came to Markham with Mr. Berzie, the 
Government Agent. Andrew was born in 1811 ; he married Miss Charlotte 
Hunter, whose parents emigrated to Canada in 1790; her mother was 
originally from Copenhagen, in Denmark. Mr. Eck ardt has been known 
throughout the township as a hardworking and enterprising man. In the 
municipality he helped to clear the land where now stands the thriving 
Village of Unionville, and was appointed Postmaster when the office was 



28S 


Biograplzical Notices. 


first established there; and, in all matters for the advantage of the township 
as a whole, Mr. Eckardt was ever ready to take his share of responsibility. 


JAMES ECKARDT, lot II, concession 6, was born upon the farm where he 
yet lives. He is of German extraction, his grandfather having emigrated 
from Bruges in 1793, and suffered all the hardships and privations of the 
early settlers. James was only fifteen years of age at the death of his 
parents; but, as he had received a good education, was well prepared to face 
the stern realities of life. He married Sarah Jane Size in 1859, by whom 
he has four sons and four daughters. He is a J.P. and License Inspector. 
He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and his influence throughout the 
section is very great. 


JOHN ECKARDT, lot 10, concession 6, is the fourth son of George Eckardt. 
The latter was born in Markham in the year 1800, and died in the same 
township in the year 1862. Our subject was born in Markham in the year 
18 43, where he has always continued to live, following the occupation of 
farmer. He married Mary, eldest daughter of John Snowball, a native of 
Yorkshire, England, by whom he has two children, viz.: Wilbert Howard 
and Ethel Maud. He belongs to the Methodist Church, and is a Reformer 
in politics. 


JOSEPH ECKARDT, lot 10, concession 6, is the youngest son of George 
Eckardt, was born in Markham Township, and is one of a family of eight 
children, all of whom are still living. He was born in 1846, and still lives 
on part of the old homestead, where he does a large and profitable trade 
in the cultivation of small fruits. He married in 1874 the eldest daughter 
of Hector C. Thomson, formerly of Glasgow, Scotland, by whom he has 
three children. His grandfather was one of the first settlers in Markham. 


ANTHONY FORSTER, lot 13, concession 9, was born in the Township of 
Markham, November 6, 1844, and is the son of \Villiam Forster, a native 
of Northumberland, England, where he was born December 22, 1813. His 
mother's maiden name was Barbara \Vurts, of Markham; their family con- 
sisted of four sons. Anthony was educated in School Section No. 2 I, 
l\1arkham Township, and subsequently at the High School, Markham 
Village. He has, since the completion of his education, been engaged in 
farming; he married January 16, 1870, Alice A. Dack, daughter of John W. 
Dack, a native of Dublin, Ireland; they have six children, viz.; Tamsine 
Emilia, Nellie Amelia, Laura Alice, Jessie Gertrude, William Dack and 
\Va1te
 Ellis (all living). Mr. Forster has occupied several important 



TOW1lS/lip of 11/ a1'kham. 


28 9 


offices in connection with municipal affairs. He has been Road Overseer, 
Assessor, Councillor, Deputy-Reeve, Public and High School Trustee, and 
a member of the Local Board of Health. He also belongs to the Agricul- 
tural Society, and is a member of the Farmers' Club. Two brothers of Mr. 
Forster, John and Elias, were drowned in the :\Iaitland River, April 16, 
186+. He is a member of the Methodist body, and a Reformer in politics. 


THO:\-IAS FRISBY, lot 25, concession 4, is the eldest son of John and 
Lucy Frisby, who emigrated from England in 1831 and settled in Thorn- 
hill, where the. father purchased a farm on concession 3, on which he 
remained until 1856; he went on business to ::\Iilwaukie, but unfortunately 
lost his life on board the Niagara boat which was burned on September 
24, 1856. This unexpected and melancholy event disturbed all existing 
arrangements and the family decided to remain in the township, Thomas 
taking upon himself the management of his late father's affairs. That the 
section benefited by the family remaining here is certain, for Mr. Frisby 
has ever proved himself anxious to promote the general well-being of the 
community; and, although he has never accepted office, yet his presence 
has ever been recognized as an advantage. He has been liberal towards 
th
 erection of churches of every denomination, and the poor and needy 
find in him a sincere friend. He married a daughter of John N ewlove, of 
Etobicoke, by whom he had ten children, nine of whom are living. 


. GEORGE GOHN, lot 9, concession 3, is the youngest son of David and 
Lucy Gohn, of this township. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, 
his mother being from New Jersey. Mr. Gohn, sen'r, came to Canada in 
1812 and took part in the war with the States, afterwards settling on the 
lot now occupied by his son George, where he remained until his death in 
1862. His wife is still living with her son on the old farm. George Gohn 
married a daughter of L. Belway, of Thornhill, by which union there are 
four sons. He has, since his father's death, greatly improved the property, 
and now possesses a very fine farm, to which he gives the closest attention. 


WILLIAM GOHN, lot 8, concession 2, is the second son of David and 
Lucy Gohn. His father was born in Pennsylvania and came to Canada 
in. 1812; he served in the \Var of 1812 and was at the Battle of York. He 
settled on lot 9, concession 3, Markham, where he remained until his death 
in 1862 ; his wife is still living. 


MOSES HEMINGWAY, deceased, was born in the Township of :l\Iarkham 
in the year 1809. He was descended from a family which claimed to be of 
20 



290 


Biograph
cal Notices. 


Scotch origin, though one of its members, Samuel Hemingway, resided in 
England previous to his departure for these shores. Samuel, as far as we 
can learn, was the first of his race to come to America; he settled in the 
United States, and brought up his family in the occupation of farming. 
The members of the Hemingway family were particularly remarkable for 
their strength and physical endurance. Josiah Hemingway, son of Samuel, 
and father of the one whose name heads this sketch, was born in the State 
of New York In the year 1774, and when a young man of twenty-four years 
determined to try his fortune in Canada. In the year 1798 he settled in the 
Township of l\Iarkham, York County, and married Miss Annie Stiver, 
daughter of the late John Stiver, and sister of the first white male child 
said to have been born in Markham. After his marriage he settled on 
lot 4, concession 4 of that township, his land then being in its primæval 
state; but through succeeding years he and his faithful helpmate after the 
first of the hardships-the laborious work of clearing-was accomplished, 
got together a very comfortable home. Josiah Hemingway died in the year 
1854. at the advanced age Qf eighty years, leaving a family of three sons 
and six daughters. Relative to the early history of York County, it may 
be mentioned that Josiah Hemingway with his seven and a-half pound axe 
cleared the first part of Y onge Street leading north from Toronto. He 
never held any public office, preferring to attend to the duties of his farm, 
which was in itself sufficient to engage his attention. PolItically he was a 
consistent Reformer, but took no active part in election contests. He was 
ever true and loyal to the British flag, the emblem of those institutions of 
freedom which he always cherished and admired. In religion he held to 
the lVlethodist Church, of which he remained a devoted member until his 
death. He was liberal in all matters that had for their object the good and 
welfare of the community at large. :Moses Hemingway, whose name heads 
this family history, was left with the old homestead on his father's death, 
and was married to :Miss Jane Burns, daughter of Thomas Burns, deceased, 
who at the time of his daughter's marriage resided in the City of Toronto. 
Moses, on taking possession of the farm, followed his father's footsteps in 
the management of the property. He was a man of powerful frame and 
robust constitution, which et1abled him to endure any amount of fatigue, 
and was considered, when in the prime of life, one of the strongest men in 
the Township of Markham. He was also a great sportsman, and might 
often have been seen with gun and dogs wending his -way in search of game. 
1\1r. Hemingway, following the example of his father, held no public office; 
in politics he was ever true to the Reform Party, but took no part in 
election struggles. In religion he belonged to the Methodist Church, and 



TOWllship of Markham. 


291 


was liberal in promoting any object whereby the well-being of society 
was to be secured. His death occurred March 15, 1875, at the age of 
sixty-six years; his widow, two sons and three daughters survive him. 
Orson Hemingway, lot 4, concession 4, Markham, is the second eldest 
son of Moses Hemingway, deceased. He manages the farm formerly in 
possession of his father, and in addition to this he is occupier of the Bee- 
Hive Hotel, at Hagerman's Corner, Markham, where everyaccommoda- 
tion is afforded to the travelling community. Mr. Orson Hemingway was 
married in 1869 to Miss Matilda Jane \Vebber, daughter of John \Vebber, 
Esq., proprietor of the Queen's Hotel, U nionville, one of the most com- 
modious and attractive hotels north of Toronto. Mr. Hemingway has a 
family of five sons and three daughters. In connection with his extensive 
farm Mr. Hemingway is applying all the latest improvements, and as a 
hotel-keeper he is found courteous and obliging, and is everything else to 
be desired. His reputation for fair dealing is well-known, and he is 
liberal in giving towards any object that is likely to promote the welfare of 
the community. 


VVILLIAM HOOD is a native of Roxburghshire, Scotland, and emigrated 
with his wife and family in 1837. His father died in 1806; his mother came 
with him to Canada. On his arrival here his family consisted of two sons 
only, which was afterwards increased to fourteen; nine only are now living. 
Most of his sons are farmers and are settled in differenfparts of the country. 
Mr. Hood has been very successful, and although commencing with only 
$100 has bought, and paid for since, five hundred and eighty-six acres 
of land. Adam Hood, son of the above, lives on lot 3, concession 6; he 
married a daughter of John Gibson, of this township. The family are 
members of the Presbyterian Church, and have ever been known as hos- 
pitable and generous to the poor and needy. 


B. HOOVER, lot 6, concession 7, was born on lot 23, concession I, 
Pickering Township, in 1852. He is one of a family of eight children, and 
worked for Mr. J. H. Ramer, of Markham, and subsequently with his 
brother, J. R. Hoover, at the mill on Duffin's Creek, two years. He after- 
wards rented a grist mill from Mr. A. Spofford for two and a-half years; 
and, before taking possession of his present mills, rented a grist and general 
custom mill from Mr. Thomas MilIne, from 1881 to 1883. The Glen Rouge 
Mill, which has a run of three stones, and a grinding capacity of fifty barrels 
per twenty-four hours, is valued by IVlr. Hoover at $8,000. In 1875 he 
married Miss Ernaline Ramer, of Markham; they have three children- 



29 2 


Biographical Notices. 


Peter' John, born May 10, 1879 ; Edith Mary, born September 23, 1881, 
and Archie, born February 3, 188 4. 


BENJAMIN B. S. JENKINS, lot 27, concession 5, is the son of the Rev. 
\Villiam Jenkins, a Presbyterian clergyman. His father was educated at 
the University of Edinburgh, and subsequently came to America, having 
for his object the propagation of the Gospel amongst the Indian tribes. 
He laboured among the Oneida Indians about twelve years; and then 
being offered a professorship in the College at Saratoga, and likewise having 
a call from York County, Canada, he accepted the latter, and travelled on 
horseback across the country to take charge of his new duties. This took 
place in the year 1816, and it is confidently stated that he was the first 
Presbyterian minister who settled in the country. Through his persevering 
efforts several churches were erected in the various townships, and his 
death, which occurred September 25, 18 43, was widely regretted. He was 
buried at Richmond Hill, the village where his last sermon was preached. 
Benjamin was born May 25, 1824, and has always followed agricultural 
pursuits, in which he has been eminently successful. He was married in 
18 4 8 to Maria F. Crosby; their family consists of four children, two sons 
and two daughters. 'Mr. Jenkins is a zealous worker in the cause of the 
church and is superintendent of the Sabbath school. 


CORNELIUS JOHNSON, lot 27, concession 7, is the son of Peter and Sarah 
Johnson, and was born June 9,1810, in Markham Township. He remained 
at home and assisted his father to clear the land till his marriage with 
:Margaret Clendenning in 1834, when he settled on his present lot. His 
family consists of four sons and three daughters, one having died, and 
are comfortably settled in the neighbourhood of the old homestead. His 
wife died December 6, 1856. He is a member of the Methodist Church, 
and is much esteemed throughout the district. 


JOHN LANGSTAFF, lot 36, concession I, one of the contributors to 
this work, was born September 9, 1819. His father came to Little York 
from Amboy, New Jersey, in the winter of 1808, riding the whole distance, 
five hundred and fifty miles, on horseback. The following year he married 
Lucy :l\Iiles, of Richmond Hill, after which he returned to his old home in 
the winter of 1809-10, and was back again at little York in the spring, the 
journey, as heretofore, being accomplished on horseback, covering a distance 
of one thousand one hundred miles. He signalized his return by settling 
on the lot now owned by his son John, and commenced school teaching. 
He opened the first public school north of Toronto. The building was 



Township of Markham. 


293 


situated on the corner of lot 35 (Mårkham) and built of round logs. During 
the War of 1812-'1+
 Mr. Langstaff held a situation in the Commissariat 
Office as book-keeper under the late George Crookshank. He died in the 
year 1863, at the age of eighty-nine years. He was a strong Conservative 
in politics, and took an active part at election times. John Langstaff, whose 
name heads this sketch, has been a farmer in Markham for the past fifty 
years. In 1847 he purchased lot 47, concession I, in Vaughan Township, 
on which he built a saw-mill and agricultural implement manufactory. He 
has been engaged in lumbering for a number of years, and has been gener- 
ally successful as a business man. He married in 1853 Elizabeth Brett, 
of English birth, by whom he has the following sons and daughters, viz. : 
George Augustus, M.D., at Thornhill; John Elliott, M.D., Brooklyn, 
New York, and married to Miss Meredith of New Brunswick; Louis 
Garibaldi, M.D., Richmond Hill; Edwin Curry, farmer; Lucy, married to 
R. D. Little, and Flora at school. Mr. Langstaff belongs to the English 
Church, and is a Conservative in politics. In connection with Mr. Lang- 
staff's present property is a mineral spring which has only recently been 
utilized, its health-giving and healing properties being found to be quite as 
remarkable as those Bethesda waters which have guch a celebrated name 
over the continent. Its constituent elements are as follow, as analyzed by 
Professor Thomas Heys, of Toronto School of Medicine: Sulphate of 
Potassa, 0.92 I; Bicarbonate of Soda, 2.068; Bicarbonate of l'vlagnesia, 9.812; 
Silica and Alumina, 1.449; Chloride of Potassium, 1.225; Bicarbonate of 
Lime,16.507; Bicarbonate of Iron, 0.669 (being 32.615 grains per gallon). The 
spring has quite a reputation and many invalids are tempted thither to test 
the peculiar properties of the waters. Mr. R. D. Little, of Brooklyn, New 
York, son-in-law to Mr. Langstaff, has charge of the Hawthorn Mineral 
Spring Residence, the name by which it is known, and every accommoda- 
tion is afforded for guests and visitors. 


JONAH LEEK, lot 15, concession 3, was born in this township. His 
parents were David and Harriet Leek. His father was born in New Jersey, 
his people removing to New York State when he was three years old. 
They remained there until 1825, when they came to Canada and, taking up 
their abode in l\Iarkham, settled here. Mr. Leek died in 1878, leaving a 
family of six children. Jonah was the only son and to him was left the 
family homestead. He married Miss Quantz; they have eight children, 
five sons and three daughters, all of whom live at home with them. Mr. 
Leek is a member of the Episcopal Church, and takes great interest in all 
affairs calculated to promote the spread of Christian principles. 



294 


Biographical Notices. 


GEORGE LEEK, lot 16, concession 3:is the youngest son of David and 
:Mary Leek. His father was born in New Jersey in 1801, but afterwards 
lived in New York State several years. He married there in 1826, and 
subsequently came to Canada, taking up his residence in Markham Town- 
ship, where he lived until his death July 19, 1882. He was much revered 
by his neighbours for his urbanity, which closely allied to his Christian 
character did much to elevate the general tone of the community, and as 
such his death was universally regretted. George, who was brought up 
upon, and still retains the old homestead, endeavours to maintain the good 
character of the family as established by his father, in which he has been 
eminently successful. He is a Liberal Reformer in politics. 


S. B. LEHMAN, lot 31, concession 5, is the second son of Daniel and 
Susanna Lehman. His father was a native of Lancaster County, Pennsyl- 
vania, and came to Canada in 1825 with his parents, and settled on lot 35. 
concession 7, Markham Township, subsequently removing to lot 35, 
Pickering Township, where he died in 1867. His family consisted of six 
children; his widow died in 1883. S. B. Lehman remained at home with 
his parents until he was twenty-five years old when he married Miss 
Frances Hoover, in 1865, and commenced farming on his own account 
which pursuit he followed until 1880. In that year he started to operate a 
flour as well as a woollen mill, and is at present doing a good business in 
both departments, l?-aving one son in the business with him. Although not 
possessing a desire for municipal honours yet he is always ready to join in 
any private enterprise likely to benefit the community, consequently much 
respect is entertained for him throughout the township. By his wife he 
has six children. 


JOH
 LUNDY, lot 5, concession 3, is the son of \Villiam Lundy, who 
emigrated from Ireland wÜh his family, consisting of five sons and three 
daughters. Mr. Lundy, sen'r, settled in Toronto Township. John was a 
cooper by trade, and being induced to settle at the German ::\Iills followed 
his occupation there for several years. He suhsequently purchased the 
farm adjoining the mill, on which he now resides. He married Sarah, 
daughter of John Curroy, of Scarboro' Township, the fruit of this union 
being eight children. He has one son at home, Joseph, who manages the 
farm. l\Ir. Lundy has been a hard working industrious man, and bears a 
high character for integrity in the township. He is an adherent of the 
Presbyterian Church, from which he never withholds his support. 



T oWllship of Markham. 


295 


ANGUS McKINNo
, lot 26, concession 5, is the sixth son of Neil 
1\1cKinnon, who emigrated from Scotland in 1812. His father came out 
with Lord Selkirk, and went with him to Manitoba, where he built a house 
on the banks of the Red River, about one and a-half miles from the present 
City of \Vinnipeg. Angus was born in Mull, Scotland, and was about three 
years old when the family settled in the far west. They left there at the 
expiration of three years on account of the misrepresentations of Lord 
Selkirk, and turned their faces eastward again. After a tedious and. 
lengthened journey they reached York, and settled in Markham, on the lot 
now occupied by Mr. McKinnon. The father died in 1829; the mother 
survived him twenty years. Angus married Mary Anthony, by whom he 
has a family of four sons and five daughters. As may be expected he has 
done a fair share of hard work, having helped to clear the farm at the time 
of settlement. He has contributed towards the erection of churches and 
the support of ministers, and in all matters concerning the welfare of the 
municipality has acted no mean part. 


ARCHIBALD McKe.moN, deceased. The late Archibald l\IcKinnon, 
l\Iarkham, was born in the year 1797 in the Isle of Mull, Argyleshire, Scot- 
land. He was the eldest of a family of four sons and three daughters. 
His father, the late Hugh McKinnon, of Markham, and his mother, Mar- 
garet McGilivray, were both of the same parish of Mull. His father, Hugh 
McKinnon was in fair circumstances in Mull, yet he was anxious to better 
the condition of his family; and his brother, the late Neil McKinnon, who 
had settled in Markham in the year 1817, from the Selkirk District in the 
North-West, where he emigrated with his family in the year 1812, held forth 
to his brother Hugh, in l\Iull, strong inducements to emigrate to Canada 
with his family. This invitation was finally accepted, and in the summer of 
I
20 Hugh and his family came to Canada. Previous to coming to Canada, 
his eldest son, L\rchibald, the subject of this sketch, was married to Miss 
Catharine McGilivray, of the same parish. They set sail from Glasgow, 
and after a rough voyage of six weeks landed at Quebec. After staying 
there for a few days they set sail for Little York, now Toronto, which they 
reached after a perilous voyage of four weeks. The journey up from 
Quebec had to be performed with Durham boats drawn by oxen and 
guided by pilots who walked on the tow-path along the shore and with 
pike-poles kept the boats at a certain distance from the shore. On land- 
ing at " muddy York," the first sight that attracted their attention was 
the dead carcase of a horse lying on the wharf and surrounded by a group 
of Indians and squaws feasting over its remains. Such a feast as this was 



29 6 


Biograpllical Notices. 


rather unnatural to the :\lull people, as they would prefer feasting over a 
dish of Loch Fine herrings and a good bowl of buttermilk. After staying 
in Little York for a short time, they set out for Markham, taking Y onge 
Street as their route, which at this time was the only road leading north 
of Toronto. After a journey of one day on foot from Toronto, they finally 
reached their destination, the home of Neil McKinnon, near Cashel, and 
now the present home of his son, Angus McKinnon. Shortly after coming 
to 
Iarkham, Hugh McKinnon and his son Archibald purchased lot 9, 
concession 6, 
farkham. 
\rchibald settled on the east end of the lot, and 
his father on the west end, each occupying one hundred acres, all bush 
land. Hugh .McKinnon, after the lapse of many years, made for himself a 
comfortable homestead, where both he and his amiable wife died in the 
year 1850, at the advanced ages of eighty-four and eighty-two; leaving a 
family of four sons and three daughters, all of them being married at the 
time of their parents' death. Archibald, the subject of this sketch, and his 
faithful wife endured (as did his father) many hardships and trials on their 
bush farm, contending against difficulties which all the early settlers had 
to fight against. The Village of Unionville, in Markham, at this period 
had no existence, and Markham Village only contained a few log houses. 
The first two bushels of fall wheat which he sowed he had carried a dis- 
tance of five miles on his back after threshing it on the same day with the 
old-fashioned implement, the flail. The first baking-kettle obtained was 
purchased with a Ìoaf of sugar, which he carried on his back to Toronto, a 
distance of twenty miles through the woods, and returned home the same 
day carrying the kettle on his back. He had frequently journeyed to 
Toronto on horseback with eggs and butter. However, through the lapse 
of time, he and his industrious wife hewed for themselves a comfortable 
home out of this forest farm, where he died on December 25, 1880, surviv- 
ing his wife by eleven years, and leaving a family of four sons and three 
daughters to survive him. His eldest son, John, resides in the Township 
of Vaughan and follows the occupation of farming; he has a family of eight 
sons and one daughter. The second eldest son, Hugh, resides in l\Iark- 
ham on his grandfather's old homestead; he has a family of four sons and 
one daughter. His son Neil follows the occupation of a Public School 
teacher and resides with his brother Allen, who is in possession of his 
father's old homestead, and his youngest sister, Christina, lives on the farm 
with him. The other two daughters, Flora and Margaret, reside in the 
Townships of Druce and Saugeen, and are married and in comfortable cir- 
cumstances. The late 
\rchibald McKinnon was a consistent member of 
the Presbyterian Church, to which denomination his family also belongs. 



Township of Markham. 


297 


In politics he was a Liberal Reformer; but took no active part in political 
contests, neither held any public office, as he was no office-seeker, prefer- 
ring to live a quiet life. Hewas honest and exact in all his public dealings, 
never had a suit in court, nor was he ever sued. He and his wife were 
kind and hospitable, their home was always open to the poor and needy, 
and they were always liberal in giving to assist in every good cause, which 
example the surviving members of the family endeavour to follow. 
ALEXANDER l'vlcLEAN, lot 10, concession 6, is the son of John and 
Isabella McLean, who emigrated from Argyleshire, Scotland, in 1824 and 
settled in York çounty, purchasing and locating on the lot on which the 
subject of this sketch now resides. His father died in 1864 and his mother 
in 18 77. Alexander follows the occupation of farmer, and is energetic and 
industrious. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a Liberal 
in politics. 
JOHN B. McLEAN, lot 3, concession 8, was born in the Township of 
Markham in 1836; his father was John B. McLean, a native of Ardigullen, 
County of Longford, Ireland, who died in 1851. His mother's maiden name 
was Eliza Preston, a native of the same place. She died in 1876. Our 
subject is one of a family of ten children, and has generally been engaged 
in farming. He married, December 2, 1864, Ophelia Peck, of Newmarket, 
daughter of Stephen Northrop Peck, deceased, formerly a dentist of 1\ew- 
market, by whom he has five children. l\Ir. McLean is in religion a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church, and a Conservative in politics. 


ALEXANDER MCPHERSON, lot 2, concession 5, is the son of Alexander 
and Annie McPherson. The family are of Scotch origin, our subject's 
grandfather having emigrated from Edinburgh about 1787, and settled in 
Nova Scotia. His father, Alexander, came from that Province to York in 
1830, and purchased the property on which the son now lives. He cleared 
his land, and, after a life spent in toil and usefulness, died in 1878. He took 
an active part in all matters pertaining to the religious welfare of the 
community among which he lived, and ministers of all denominations have 
received from him a hearty welcome. He left a family of one son and five 
daughters. The subject of this sketch married Elizabeth, daughter of 
\Villiam Hood. She died leaving one child. In 1855 he married a second 
time, his wife was Hester Kennedy; they have no children. :\Ir. McPher- 
son has much improved his farm, which is now a very valuable one, and 
contains two hundred and twelve acres of choice land. He follows in the 
footsteps of his father, which is the highest compliment that can be paid 



29 8 


BiograplLical Notices. 


to him, and in all matters which concern the good of the township he is 
ready to contribute his share of time and labour. He is a York Pioneer 
and also holds a Lieutenant's commission in the militia. 



\NDREW MILLER, lot 34, concession I, is the youngest son of Henry 
and l\Iary (Kennedy) Miller. His father settled in Markham Township 
during the administration of Governor Simcoe, where he lived until his 
death in 1884. He was throughout his long life industrious, and discharged 
his manifold duties with conscientious care. He filled the office of District 
Councillor, and was a member of the first Council Board of the township, 
and also belonged to the County Council. As a sincere and devoted member 
of the Presbyterian Church his death was much lamented by that body in 
the district. Andrew has always lived on the old homestead which he now 
owns, and like his father, is much respected in the neighbourhood. He 
takes no part in the affairs of the municipality; but attends strictly to his 
own immediate concerns, and has been very successful. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church. He married a daughter of John \Velsh of this 
township, by whom he had four sons, one of whom is in California. His 
grandfather built the first grist mill in Markham. 


JOHN l\IILLER, lot 19, concession 10, is the son of George and Catharine 
l\Iiller. His father was a native of Dumfries, Scotland, and emigrated to 
Canada in 1832, settling in the Township of Markham, where he remained 
until his death which occurred in 1880. During his lifetime he was largely 
engaged in stock-raising, and was, we believe, the first to import into 
Ontario the Leicester and Cotswold breed of sheep as well as the Short- 
horn Durham cattle. He was also mainly instrumental in establishing the 
Provincial Exhibition, and up to the time of his death was a most active 
member of the society. He was on one occasion burned out, losing by 
that conflagration nine valuable horses, fourteen head of cattle and thirty- 
two sheep. He was, however, not discouraged by this calamity, but took 
the earliest possible opportunity of having his stock recruited from the Old 
Country. John, foilowing the same course as his father, deals largely in 
a thoroughbred stock, but never exhibited at any of the large shows. He 
is married, and has s
x children. 


LUTON l\IILLER, lot 16, concession 8, is the fourth son of Joshua Miller, 
who came from Saratoga, New York State, in 1801, and settled on lot 22, 
concession 8, in Markham Township, where he lived until his death in the 
year 18 51. Luton was born on the old homestead in 1809, and on com- 
mencing life for himself purchased the farm where he resided until his 



Township of Markham. 


299 


death, which occurred July 7, 1884. Having grown up with the township, 
he contributed not a little towards the making of roads and the erection of 
churches and school-houses. Among the positions he held may be mentioned 
Roadmaster, Trustee of Schools and Deacon of the Baptist Church. He 
was also a Lieutenant in the militia, and was one of the first to answer the 
call to arms during the perilous times of the Rebellion. 


\VILLIAM MILLIKEN, lot 5, concession 5, is the descendant of a U. E. 
Loyalist family whose property was confiscated during the Revolutionary 
\V ar. They settled in New Brunswick, but afterwards removed to York 
County, Ontario. His grandfather, Norman Milliken, located in Markham 
about 1805, where he remained until his death. His father, Benjamin 
Milliken, was born in New Brunswick in 1794, and was about eleven years 
old when the family removed to York. He volunteered for active service 
during the \Var of 1812, and was present at the Battle of Queenston Heights. 
The arms he carried on that memorable occasion are still in possession of 
the family. He also took an active part in the loyal cause during the 
Rebellion of 1837-38. He received a Captain's commission, and subsequently 
was appointed l\Iajor. As a fitting reward for long and distinguished service 
he was commissioned a Justice of the Peace, the duties of which he fulfilled 
with zeal tempered by moderation. He was a faithful adherent of the 
Methodist Church, and his house was always open in welcome to ministers 
of every denomination. He was generous to the poor and needy,' and 
exemplified his Christian principles by bestowing liberally for the further- 
ance of the Gospel. He died July 3, 1863, at the age of sixty-nine years. 
\Villiam was born on the old homestead July 2, 1834. He married Miss 
Mary E. Hood, by whom he has two sons and three daughters. Since he has 
had possession of the farm he has considerably improved and beautified it 
by planting hedgerows, etc. He is believed to have the best stock of Durham 
cattle and Cotswold sheep in the section. He has been seven years a mem- 
ber of the Municipal Council, and four years in the County Council. He at 
present occupies the position of Postmaster, and is a Lieutenant in the militia. 


JOHN MORGAN, lot 28, concession I, is of Scotch descent, his parents 
being Thomas and Sarah (l'vlunshaw) Morgan. His father died in 1846, and 
his mother in 1838. His father was a blacksmith, and by industry and 
economy, left behind him a fine property of between four and five hundred 
acres. John followed his paternal parent's trade, and in addition farms his 
land, which through his care and attention has been rendered highly pro- 
ductive. He married Miss Margaret Clarke, Thornhill; the fruit of this 
union is two children. Mr. Morgan is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 



3 00 


Biographical Notices. 


NATHAN MUNSHAW, lot 35, concession I. The family originally came 
from Pennsylvania. The grandfather, Balsam Munshaw, a U. E. Loyalist 
in company with Isaac Devins, came to Canada with Governor Simcoe, 
and settled in the Township of l'vIarkham. The subject of this sketch was 
born October 22, 1884, on the lot where he now resides. His father's name 
was \Villiam; his mother was a daughter of the above-mentioned l\1r. 
Devins. It is claimed for the eldest sister that she was the first white child 
born in Y or k. IV1 r. 1\1 unsha w, sen 'r, died J ul y 13, 1846; his wife died June 
27, 1881. Nathan was married in 1869 to Miss Jane E. Martin, by whom 
he has three children. He has greatly improved the homestead since his 
father's death, by erecting new buildings and planting trees. His eldest 
brother, \Villiam M., lives with him and has an interest in the property. 
1\1r. M unshaw has not been an office-seeker, being contented to attend to 
his own business. He is a member of the Methodist Church, and a 
consistent Christian. 


WILLIA:\f MUSTARD, lot 29, concession 3, is the second son in a family 
of twelve 
hildren. His father was George Mustard, of Scotch birth, who 
was pressed into the English Navy during the wars of Napoleon. He 
sailed for South America, and his ship having captured several prizes 
subsequently sailed for the \Vest Indies. Mr. Mustard while there left the 
Navy and removed to the United States, from thence to Canada, and took 
up his residence in Markham, where he lived until his death in 1854. He 
served during the \Var of 1812 as Lieutenant under Colonel ADen. In the 
Battle of York he was at the western battery when it was blown up, and 
was taken prisoner by the Americans j but was exchanged, when he again 
took up arms and served until the end of the war. \Villiam lives on the 
old homestead, and married Miss Annie Graham, of Pickering, by whom 
he had nine children. He underwent in early life all the hardships that fall 
to the lot of the pioneer, but being a man of powerful frame, and withal 
resolute will, he conquered every difficulty, and has now the supreme satis- 
faction of knowing that the toil has not been in vain. He is a member of 
the Christian Church, and takes great interest in the \vork of the Sabbath 
school. 


AMBROSE NOBLE was born in Massachusetts, United States, in 1795. 
His native town was \Yest Springfield, his father being Stephen Noble who 
emigrated from thence to Canada before the \Var of 1812. Ambrose settled 
on lot 16, concession 8, l\Iarkham Township. He married in 1821 Hannah 
Badgerow, by whom he had eleven .children, six boys and five girls, all of 



TOW1lship of 111 arkham. 


3 01 


whom are married with the exception of two who live at home. His wife 
died August 27, 1879. Jesse Noble, lot 5, concession 6, second son of the 
above. In early life he assisted his father to clear the farm, and on 
reaching manhood occupied his present lot. He married a daughter of the 
late Colonel Button, by whom he has one son, VV. A., who lives at home. 
Mr. Noble has very much improved his property, and has shown con- 
siderable taste and skill in planting trees around his demesne, which is 
considered one of the prettiest places in the township. He has not sought 
or accepted office on the Municipal Board, but has principally attended to 
his own immediate concerns. 


\YILLIAM HENRY NORRIS, deceased, Lieutenant-Colonel of the 12th 
Battalion of York Rangers, and a Justice of the Peace of some twenty-two 
years' standing in the County of York, was a native of England, and 
graduated LL.D., at Oxford University. He was educated for the 
ministry, and held a living in the Church of England when he came to 
Canada in 1839. A few years after his arrival he gave up his charge, which 
was either at Scarboro' or at Markham, and commenced to speculate in 
land, and other profitable investments,' by which he amassed considerable 
means. He was appointed a Justice of the Peace for the County of York, 
about 1856, which position he retained until his death. About the same 
year that he was appointed J.P., he started a company of volunteers in the 
neighbourhood of Scarboro' (the 12tl1 Battalion, York Rangers), and always 
continued to take an interest in them. He accompanied the Rangers to 
Niagara, during the Fenian Raid of 1866, and stayed with them while they 
were camped along with the medical staff at the Mount Eagle House, near 
the bridge. The regiment did not take part in the Battle of Ridgeway. 
Colonel Norris espoused Elizabeth Gray, also a native of England, by 
whom he had two sons, who now reside in York County. Colonel Norris 
died very suddenly on March 18, 1878, of apoplexy, a complaint from which 
he had for more than a year previously suffered. He had been to the New 
Fort on Garrison Common, Toronto, on business having reference to the 
12th Battalion, and while boarding a Yonge Street car, with the intention 
of proceeding to his home in Y orkville, the attack which soon after proved 
fatal came upon him; assistance was promptly procured and he was 
carried to a neighbouring store, where he was atte
ded by Dr. Riddell. 
The latter came to the conclusion that the case was a hopeless one, and at 
once secured a cab in which he had his patient placed, and within an hour 
had him in his own home in Yorkville. All that human ingenuity could 
devise and medical skill accomplish was done for the sufferer; but his life 



3 02 


Biographical Notices. 


could not be saved, and before 8 p.m. the same evening Colonel Norris had 
breathed his last. His funeral was largely attended by the general public, 
and his remains were followed by two companies of the 12th York Battalion, 
also a number of the rank and file of the Queen's Own, the Governor- 
General's Body Guard, the Field Battery, and the loth Royals. A large 
number of commissioned officers were present, besides several prominent 
citizens of Toronto. The body was temporarily lodged in the vault at St. 
J ames's Cemetery, and was subsequently removed to its final resting place 
in Scarboro. Of the esteem in which Colonel Norris was held by his brother 
magistrates and neighbours, the following memorial is sufficient testimony: 
"That the Magistrates of the County of York, in adjourned General 
Sessions of the Peace for the transaction af the public business, are deeply 
impressed by the absence from among them of two esteemed friends, for 
whom they had entertained sentiments of the most affectionate regard- 
they refer to the late Colonel Richard R. D. Denison and Lieut.-Colonel 
\V. Norris, whose loss as members of their body is seriously felt, and 
engenders feelings of sincere sorrow. Impelled by a sense of duty, and 
actuated by feelings of long-tried friendship, this court desires to place on 
record that they have always found in those gentlemen unswerving integrity 
and zeal for the public good, and beg leave to assure the bereaved families 
of their departed friends how truly they sympathize with them in the very 
painful bereavement which, by the dispensation of Providence, has fallen 
upon them." \V. P. Norris resides on lot 4, concession 6, Markham Town- 
ship, and is the eldest son of the late Lieut.-Colonel \V. H. P. Norris. He 
was born in London, England, in the year 1835. Came to Canada with his 
father in 1839, and after receiving a fair education, turned his attention to 
farming, which occupation he has since followed. By perseverance, industry 
and good management, he has made for his family a comfortable home. 
He was married in 1868 to Miss Letitia Cairns; they have two sons and 
five daughters. Mr. Norris is a Liberal Conservative in politics, and has 
never taken any active part in contested elections. He is no office seeker, 
but finds sufficient outlet for his ambition in the cultivation of his farm, and 
towards the comforts of his home. The only positions of any importance 
held by Mr. Norris were a lieutenancy in the militia of Scarboro', which 
had he desired it would have been raised to the captaincy, and Public 
School Trustee for his own section for a term. Mr. Norris bears the repu- 
tation of being very"exact in his public dealings, and his liberality towards 
all objects of public benefit is very charitable; and his hospitable and 
genial manner is particularly noticeable and appreciated by his neighbours 
and friends. 



Township of Markham. 


3 0 3 


MARSHALL O'NEILL, lot 10, concession 6, brick manufacturer, was born 
in IVlarkham in 1856, and is the son of Isaac O'Neill, who for some years 
carried on a brick manufactory in the Township of Uxbridge. Our subject 
commenced business for himself in 1882, anò has been very prosperous. 
He married Miss l\lary Hampton, by whom he has two children, \Villiam 
A., and Frederick O. Mr. O'Neill takes a lively interest in all matters 
pertaining to the welfare of the municipality. 


JOHN PETERSON, lot 19, concession 6, is of German extraction, his 
father, Philip Frederick Peterson, being a native of Hanover. His grand- 
father was a minister of the Lutheran Church, who emigrated to America 
in 1795 with his family. In 1831 Philip Frederick purchased the lot now 
owned by our subject, on which he lived until his death in 1880, at the age 
of eighty-nine years. He left a widow and four children, three daughters, 
and John who was the only son. The latter took possession of the old 
homestead, which he continues to cultivate. He is of a quiet and unassum- 
ing disposition, and has never held or sought office in connection with 
municipal government. 


FRANCIS PIKE, lot II, concession 9, was born in Pennsylvania in 1804, 
and came to Canada in 1824. The prospects during the first few weeks of 
his advent were not encouraging, and only the want of funds prevented him 
from returning to Pennsylvania, but content came at last and with it 
success. He married in 1826 Elizabeth Strickler, by whom he had a family 
of fourteen children, nine of whom are living. He bought the old home- 
stead, lot 30, concession 8, Markham, in 1826, and made it one of the most 
desirable farms in Markham; at that time it was harder to pay for a farm 
at $4 per acre than now at 880, owing to the absence of markets, and the 
impassable roads. Peter, his eldest son, has two fine farms, and John, 
another son, has three farms, all of which are in the vicinity of the old 
homestead. Francis sold his own farm, and bought ten acres, on which he 
built a beautiful brick house and out-buildings, and has also a fine orchard 
adjoining. Mr. Pike bears a good reputation for charity in the township, 
and steadily seeks how best to put in practice the precepts of the Great 
Teacher. He is a member of the Mennonite Church, and has been School 
Trustee for several years. 


JOHN PINGLE, lot 21, concession 5, is the son of George and Mary 
Pingle, who emigrated from Germany and settled in the United States in 
1792. His parents only remained there one year before coming to Canada 



3 0 4 


Biographical Notices. 


and at once proceeded to Markham and located on the lot now occupied 
by him. He was born on the homestead in 1804, and from his earliest 
years was accustomed to the severe labour which fell to the lot of pioneers 
in clearing the bush. He managed to attend the German school of the 
district during the winter months, his services being in request on his 
father's farm in summer. In 1827 he married Miss Jane Hunter; eight 
children being the fruit of the union. Of that family six are still living- 
two sons and four daughters. He was presented with one hundred acres 
of land with which to commence for himself, and by prudence, industry and 
thrift he was enabled to give his sons a fair start in life. He has a son and 
daughter living at home; the name of the former being Alexander, who 
manages the farm. Mr. Pingle is a member of the Church of England, and 
held the position of \Varden in connection with that body for a number of 
years. 


FREDERICK QUANTZ, deceased, an early settler in Markham Township, 
was born in London, England, in 1782. He was a German by birth, his 
father being a soldier in the English Army, and fought in that capacity 
during the American \Var of Independence. The latter returned to Europe 
on the restoration of peace, and while there his son Frederick was born. He 
subsequently returned to America, landing in Philadelphia in 179 1 ; from 
thence he came to Canada and settled in Markham in 1793, where Fred- 
erick thereafter continued to reside. Our subject served in the War of 
1812 under Colonel Butler, in command of the Markham Cavalry, and 
afterwards drew a small pension. He died in the year 1877. George 
Quantz, son of the above, on commencing for himself purchased part of lot 
12, concession 2, in Markham, and also two hundred acres of land near 
Barrie, in Simcoe County, on one hundred acres of which his son Frank 
now resides. He also bought fifty acres of land on lot 38, concession I, 
where his son Arthur resides. He married a daughter of Edward Phillips, 
of this township, by whom he has three sons and four daughters. He has 
a married daughter living in Vaughan Township, and a son-in-law who. is 
a lawyer in Toronto. Mr. Quantz and his wife are famed throughout the 
district for their hospitality, shelter never being refused the wayfarer. 
Arthur Quantz, lot 38, concession I, son of the above, was born in Mark- 
ham in 18 49. He has been connected with farming all his life, and the 
interest he takes in agricultural matters is amply shown by the fact that he 
is President of the Agricultural Society of this township. He married in 
18 75, 
'largaret, daughter of Thomas Linklatter. He is a member of the 
Lutheran Church, and holds a Trusteeship. 



Township of Markham. 


3 0 5 


FREDERICK QUANTZ, lot 26, concession 6, is the eldest son of George 
and Mary Quantz. His father was a native of Hamburg, Germany, and 
came with his parents to the United States in 1772, where they remained 
about one year; subsequently coming to Canada and settling in this town- 
ship. Mr. Quantz, sen'r, remained at home until his marriage in 180 7, 
when he removed to a farm of his own. Frederick married l\Iargaret 
Puterbough, by whom he had ten children. She died in 1854, and he 
married a second time to Mrs, ::\Iary Lundy, a widow; they have two 
children, a son and a daughter, who live at home with them. l\Ir. Quantz 
is a member of the l\lethodist Church. 


JOHN RAMER, lot 30, concession 8, is the son of Abraham and Fanny 
Raymer, and was born in Pennsylvania, U. S., in 1810. He came to 
Canada in 1822 with his parents, and remained on the homestead until his 
marriage, clearing up the land. His wife was Elizabeth Sophia Breuls, 
daughter of John Breuls, a native of London, England, by whom he had 
eleven children, as follow: Hannah, dead; Elizabeth, married; Fanny, 
who married Mr. Mitchell, dead; Mary, living at home; Anna; married; 
Philip, married; l\Iartha, dead; John, married; l\largaret, married; 
George, dead, and Joseph, who lives at home. Although Mr. Ramer has 
suffered reverses, and has not always enjoyed the best of health, he has 
nevertheless a fine farm of two hundred acres and is in easy circumstances. 
He is a member of the Mennonite Church. 


PETER RAMER, lot 14, concession 7, is the son of Abraham Ramer, and 
was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, March 7, 1800, and came to 
Canada in 1809, settling on lot 1+, concession 8, Markham, where he lived 
until his marriage in 1823 with Miss Elizabeth Byer; they had a family of 
three sons and one daughter, Abraham, jonas, john and :Martha Reesor, 
all of whom are living in this township. The family belong to the Menno- 
nite Church, and are in very good circumstances. Mr. Ramer, though now 
advanced in years, still continues hale and hearty and can yet read the 
newspaper without the aid of spectacles. Deer Park Farm, lot 15, conces- 
sion 8, Markham, the home of Peter and Elizabeth Ramer for fifty-four 
years, was always open to receive weary strangers, and l\Ir. Ramer was one 
of the most enterprising and prominent pioneer farmers in Markham. Mrs. 
Ramer died in 1877. 


PETER RAYMER, lot 32, concession 8, is the son of the late Abraham 
Raymer, who came with his family from Pennsylvania, U.S., in 1822, and 
settled in this township. Peter was flbout five years old when his people 
21 



3 06 


BiograPhical Notices. 


came to Canada, and was brought up to farming. His family consists of 
four sons and three daughters-Jacob, the eldest son, is located on lot 12, 
concession 7, of \Vhitchurch, and married Martha Breuls; the other mem- 
bers of the family are Fanny, married to John Heisey; Abraham, married 
to Matilda Stockley, located on lot 8, concession 7, Township of \Vhit- 
church; Mary and Christian (the two last named being twins), Elizabeth 
and Peter. Christian Raymer married Christina Stouffer. He is of a 
studious disposition, and often fills the pulpit of Mennonite Brethren in 
Christ. 1\1r. Peter Raymer has been successful enough to give each of his 
sons a good farm and yet retain for himself fifty acres, and bears an excep- 
tionally good character among his neighbours in the section. 


BENJAMIN B. REESOR. The family first settled in Markham in 1804, 
John Reesor, the father of our subject, being born at Cedar Grove a short 
time afterwards. Mr. Reesor, sen'r, assisted to clear the farm, and for 
some years was proprietor and ran a grist-mill in his native village, until 
receiving from his father lot I, concession II, of Markham, he repaired 
thither and commenced farming. He subsequently bought land adjoining, 
and his property in all amounted to about seven hundred acres. His 
death occurred in 1864. Benjamin was born in 1836, and is the owner of 
the old homestead, being the youngest in a family of five children. He 
married Nancy Hoover in 1857; the result of this union being eleven 
children. He is a Reformer in politics, and a member of the Mennonite 
Church; he has a brother, a minister in that body. 


MRS. C. REESOR, lots 14 and IS, concession 10, relict of the late C. 
Reesor, of this township, is a daughter of Calvin Cornell, of Scarboro' 
Township. She was married to Mr. Reesor in August, 1866, and his death, 
which took place on April 25, 1877, left her with five children, viz.: Albert 
C. Grasett, Victoria M., John A. E., Frederick E. N., and Maude C. E., 
all of whom are still living. By the father's will each of the sons received 
three hundred acres of land, the daughters having divided among them the 
village property. To Mrs. Reesor was left the management of the estate, 
together with its income, besides village property and money. Her deceased 
husband was a Conservative in politics, and an adherent of the English 
Church. Mrs. Reesor belongs to the Methodist persuasion, and recently 
gave a lot in the Village of Stouffville on which to build a church. Her 
father, the late :\1r. Calvin Cornell, died in Detroit, Mich., under circum- 
stances that provoked at the time a strong suspicion of foul play. He had 
gone on a journey to the United States to buy land, and for that purpose 



Township of Markham. 


3 0 7 


carried with him a large sum of money; he took sick at Detroit and died, 
and the doctor who attended him was tried at the Courts in Toronto for 
having poisoned Mr. Calvin Cornell, but managed to clear himself. All 
the money and some notes disappeared. 


JOSEPHUS REESOR, lots 3 and 4, concession 9, was born in the Town- 
ship of Markham, January 10, 1820, being the son of Peter Reesor, a native 
of Pennsylvania, who emigrated to Canada at an early day. The family is 
one of great respectability and is very well known throughout the township. 
Mr. Reesor has followed farming since he commenced for himself, which 
occupation was also followed by his father. Mr. Reesor is a IVlennonite in 
religion, and in politics is a Conservative. 


\VILLIAM REESOR, lot 22, concession 10, Township of Markham, is the 
eldest son of the late Christian Reesor, and was born in this township, 
March 24, 1821, where he has always resided. He has been married twice, 
the first time to l\Iary Jane Campbell, who died August I, 1862, by whom 
he had two sons and one daughter; one son and the daughter died in infancy 
and the other son is now established in the jewellery business in Brandon, 
Manitoba. His second wife was Jeannette, daughter of Hector Thompson, 
of Cedar Grove, by whom he has one son and two daughters. \ViUiam 
Reesor and his wife belong to the \Vesleyan l\Iethodist Church, of which 
they are exemplary and consistent members. 


JONATHAN SLATER, farmer, Buttonville Post-office. Benjamin Slater, 
the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in N ew York State, in 
1789, and while yet a young man came to Canada, and became a British 
subject. When the War of 1812- 1 5 broke out he took up arms in defence 
of his adopted country. He settled first on Yonge Street, near Hogg's 
Hollow, but afterwards removed to Markham Township, where he purchased 
a farm on which he lived until his death in 1868, at the ripe old age of 
seventy-nine years. Jonathan received a good common school education, 
remained on the farm, and on his father's death came into possession of the 
homestead. By his energy and industry, and by adopting the most 
approved system of farming, he has raised himself to a front rank among 
the agriculturists of this section, and is a prominent member of the 
Farmers' Club. He has given considerable attention to the improvement 
of stock, especially sheep. His religious persuasion is Presbyterian. In 
politics he is a consistent Liberal, but has never aspired to political 
distinction. 



3 08 


Biographical Notices. 


JOHN SNOWBALL, lot 8, concession 7, was born in Yorkshire, England, 
and came to Canada in 1842. He settled first at Y orkville, where he 
followed his occupation of brick-maker. In 1845 he removed to Markham, 
and established his present business which was up to 1860 confined to the 
manufacture of brick alone. In that year he was enabled, by importing 
machinery from England, to enter largely into the manufacture of tiles, 
which business he still follows. Besides his "two sons he finds constant 
employment for two men, and his close application to business has been the 
means of securing him a large trade. He married Ann Glue, of Y orkville, 
by whom he has seven children, four sons and three daughters; a son and 
a daughter are dead. He is an adherent of the Methodist Church. 


\VILLIAM SPENCE, merchant tailor, Unionville, was born in Yorkshire, 
England, September 4, 1858, and came to Canada in 188 3. He located 
first in Hamilton, where he was employed as cutter, subsequently removing 
to U nionville, where he commenced business for himself. Since his advent 
he has met with considerable encouragement, the business in the near future 
promising to be a prosperous one. He married Elizabeth Love, of Y ork- 
shire, England, by whom he has two children. He takes great interest in 
the temperance movement, and holds the position of \Vorthy Patriarch in 
the Sons of Temperance Society. 


JAMES STATENBURGH, lot 25, concession 3, is the youngest of three 
children, and was born in Markham Township in 1821, where he received 
his education. He is of Dutch descent, his grandparents having been born 
in Holland. He is now living on the family homestead, having received 
the same from his father, after paying off the other members of the family. 
He has in addition other property which he has purchased, and has laid 
out a great deal of money in buildings and improvements. He held the 
office of Postmaster and is still License Inspector of the district. He is 
Captain of the militia, having risen to that rank by merit from the grade of 
private. He was twice married, first to a daughter of Robert Nichol, who 
died in 1845. He married the following year a daughter of Robert Grundy 
from Yorkshire, England, who died in 1883' By his first wife he had one 
daughter; by his second wife three sons and two daughters. 


REUBEN H. STIVER, general merchant, U nionville, was born in Mark- 
ham Township, July 16, 1855. He is the only son of Robert Stiver, who 
was born also in Markham Township, October 25, 1818, and, when quite 
young, removed with his parents to Toronto Township; but returned again 



Township of lI:larkham. 


3 0 9 


to Markham in a few years; he was one of the young pioneers of Markham, 
and at the present time is the oldest member of the Stiver family now 
living; he is a staunch Reformer, and took part in the Rebellion of 1837. 
He married Annie Bell, a native of Cumberland, England, who came to 
Canada when only eight years of age. Reuben A. Stiver commenced life 
on a farm, but, at the age of twenty-two, he gave up farming and engaged 
in the hardware business in Unionville, which he continued until January 
I, 1884. He is now engaged in the general business in the same place. 
On March 2,1880, he married Eleanor, the third daughter of the late James 
Mustard, of l'v'larkham; his wife was born on July II, 1855. In religion he 
is an adherent of the Lutheran Church, in politics he is a Reformer. His 
wife is a Presbyterian. 


W. STIVER, lot 14, concession 5, public school teacher and farmer, was 
born in Markham Township, l'v1ay 17, 1830. He is of German descent, his 
grandfather having emigrated to the United States from Hamburg, 
Germany, in 1792. He (the grandfather) remained in New York State about 
one year, and in 1793 came and settled in Markham Township. Our 
subject's father, Francis Stiver, was born near Rochester, New York State, 
in 1793, and came to Markham Township with the family. He served with 
his brother John as a volunteer during the War of 1812-'14' His death 
occurred May 12, 1879, at the age of eighty-six years and eleven months. 
The mother of our subject was Elizabeth Lindsay, who was born at South- 
ampton, England, in 1805; she died in 1873. William Stiver is one of a 
family of nine children, and after receiving a good scholastic training he 
commenced the business of life as school-teacher. He began his duties in 
1851, which he continued uninterruptedly to fulfil until so recent a date as 
December, 1884. During the course of his career of thirty-four years' tutor- 
ship it is calculated that he travelled on foot to and from school, altogether 
a distance of sixty-nine thousand five hundred and twelve miles. He had 
something like one thousand four hundred and seventy-eight different pupils 
under his care, some of whom are now professors, ministers, and high and 
public school teachers. He taught eleven years in No. 5 Section, two 
years in No. 10 Section, and twenty-one years in No. II School Section of 
Markham Township. 1V1r. Stiver was married at the Lutheran Parsonage, 
Vaughan, December 24, 1873, to Elizabeth J., daughter of Andrew and 
Rebecca (May) \ìVagner. Two children only are the issue of this marriage, 
Elma May and J. L. Bernard. Mr. Stiver belongs to the Lutheran Church, 
and is a Reformer. As an illustration of the tenacity with which _ the 
members of this family cling to their political principles, it is recorded as 



3 10 


Biog-raþhical No/ices. 


a fact that never on a
y occasion did the father or one of his six sons poll a 
Conservative vote. 


\VILLIAM STIVER, lot 13, concession 4, is the son of John and Mary 
Stiver. His mother, it is stated, was the first white child born in Markham, 
her birth being on April 7, 1794. The family originally came from Han- 
over, Germany, in 1793; and Mr. Stiver, the father of our subject, served 
in the \Var of 1812, for which he drew a pension. He died in 1879. William 
married a daughter of Robert Hesk, of this township, by whom he has nine 
children, all living. 


DANIEL TIPP, lot 23, concession 4, is the son of William and Catharine 
Tipp. His mother was born in Pennsylvania of German parents. His 
father was born in Germany in 1755, and came to America as a soldier in 
the German Legion of the British Army, and served through the Revolu- 
tionary \Var. At its conclusion he settled in Pennsylvania, but subsequently 
came to Canada where he drew three hundred acres of land from the Crown. 
His grant was at Chippewa Creek, which he afterwards sold and removed 
to Toronto. He located soon after in Markham. He took part in the 
\Yar of 1812, and was at the Battle of York. Mr. Tipp, sen'r, being 
ignorant, of farming, was not very successful; but the last days of himself 
and wife were spent in comfort in the home of their son. Daniel was born 
in 1799 at Richmond Hill, and has always been a resident of Markham. 
\\'hen he reached manhood he purchased two hundred acres of land in 
Tecumseth, and afterwards bought in Markham the lot where he now 
resides. He married Sarah Perkins; the issue of the union being two 
daughters, both married. Mr. Tipp's religious principles are sound, and 
he gives liberally to all denominations. He has not sought office, but has 
quietly attended to his own affairs, which have been successful. 


JAMES TRAN, lot 6, concession 10, is of Scotch descent, but was born in 
Yorkshire, England, in 1814. He emigrated to Canada in 1843, his mother 
and remainder of family coming in 1844, his father having died in England. 
In 1845 he settled in Markham, the family comprising a small colony of 
themselves, there being nine sons and three daughters; two have since died, 
a son and a daughter. James has always followed farming, and during the 
first few years of his residence in the township rented a farm. In 1856 he 
bought the property, and five years later added to the purchase, making in 
all one hundred and ninety acres of choice land. The lively interest he 
took in agricultural matters gained for him the Presidency of the County 



TOW1lship of Markham. 


3 1I 


Agricultural Society, and he was for twenty-six years Director and] udge 
of the Provincial Exhibition. He has imported stock from the Old 
Country, together with agricultural implements, and in connection with 
this business has five different times crossed the Atlantic. He has been 
License Inspector seven years, and during his residence in the township 
has contributed materially to its progress. He married in England in 18 37 
Mary Ann Gardham, by whom he had thirteen children; nine only are 
living, seven of whom are married. One of his daughters, Maggie, has been 
successful in securing the first prize for the best Farmer's Wreath, at York 
County, \Vhitby and Newmarket Fairs. Mr. Tran has at present twenty- 
four grand-children. 


\V ALTER \V. VV ALKER, lot 26, concession 6, hotel proprietor, was born 
in Essex, England, and emigrated from there to the United States in 18 7 2 . 
He came to Canada one year later, and was for some time engaged on the 
survey of the Canadian Pacific Railway. He took possession of the present 
hotel in 1880, and makes an entertaining and agreeable host. He also fills 
the position of County Constable with zeal and discretion. Mr. \Valker 
married Christiana E. Hunter of this township, by whom he has one child, 
a daughter. - 


THOMAS \VILLIAMSON, the present Reeve of the Township of Markham, 
was born in the township in 1848, and is essentially a self-made man. His 
father emigrated from England in r837, and settled at Richmond Hill, 
where after renting two farms, he ultimately purchased land on lot 26, 
concession 7. His parents were married in England, his mother's maiden 
name being Hannah Bowlor; their family consisted of seven children. 
Between the years 1866 and 1877 Thomas taught school in the village, and 
afterwards bought a fårm of ninety-five acres on lot 31, concession 5, of this 
township. He married in 1860 Miss Jane Lee of Markham, by whom he 
has four children as follow: Elizabeth, born 1871; John, born 18 73; 
Ernest, born 1875; and Clarabell, born 1879. Mr. \Villiamson has been 
Deputy-Reeve and Councillor. 


DAVID \VISMER, lot 17, concession 7, was born in this township in 180 7, 
being the son of David and Lydia vVismer, who emigrated from Pennsyl- 
vania in r805, 
nd making the journey with a yoke of oxen, settled in 
Markham. His parents died in 1856. David married in 1826 Mary Toman, 
by whom he had fourteen children; ten are still living. Elijah, the 
youngest son, resides with his parents, and takes the management of the 



3 12 


Biographical Notzces. 


farm. He married Susanna Strickler, by whom he has four children. :\Ir. 
\Vismer, sen'r, though over seventy-six years of age, still preserves the 
activity of youth, and though his long life has been energetic and indus- 
trious. He has assisted in the making of roads and other necessary 
improvements for the comfort and convenience of the inhabitants of the 
section, and in various ways has proved his usefulness to the community. 
He is a member of the Christian Church. 



VILLAGE OF MARKHAM. 





!
 
---- --

 

 
 
 -
 J- 


VILLAGE OF l\1ARKHAl\1. 


I'èI 

, -; OHN ANTHONY, builder, was born in Norfolk, England, and 
,r 
 . -' came to Canada with his father, who settled in Scarboro' Town- 
'17}1 '- ship, in 1836. John remained at home until 1850, when he was 


 apprenticed to Mr. Peter Lapp, with whom he learned the trade 
t,_r. o of carpenter. In] 856 he commenced business with Mr. Matthew 

: {:1 Swallow, and two years later removed to Pickering and began 
business for himself, which he carried on until 1870. He then 
became foreman for Speight & Son, which position he held eleven years. 
He now rents a large factory, where he manufactures sashes, doors and all 
kinds of general wood work. Mr. Anthony has the reputation of being a 
first-class draughtsman and architect, and has erected some of the finest 
buildings in the township. In 1858 he married l\Iary Cook. By this union 
he has four children, Mary, Arthur, H. Oscar and Stella. On October 23, 
1883, l\Ir. Anthony lost all his property by fire. 


SAMUEL CHARLES ASH was born in Devonshire, England, in 1817. He 
belonged to H.M.'s 43rd Regiment of Foot, and came to Canada with the 
corps in 1838. They were first stationed at Montreal, and afterwards 
removed to Niagara Falls. In 1846 he returned to England, where he got 
his discharge. The following year he came to Canada and located in 
Montreal a short time, and in 1848 he went to Toronto. After spending 
some little time at Thornhill, he commenced business in Toronto as a mer- 
chant tailor. From there he went to Uxbridge and ultimately came to 
Markham Village. In 1850 he married Elizabeth \Vashington, who died 
on December II, 1877; they had five children, viz.: Elizabeth Maria, born 
May 27,1851; Elizabeth Maria, born July 21, 1852; Agnes Augusta, born 
September 21, 1853 (the three last named died in infancy); Frederick 
Charles, born February 22, 1855; Elizabeth Maria, born May 4, 1858. 



3 16 


Bl:ograþltical Notices. 


EBENEZER BURK, postmaster, was born on lot 24, concession 10, of 
-Markham Township, in 1847, and is the son of David Burk, who emigrated 
from Ireland in 1833. His mother's maiden name was Jane L. Campbell. 
In 1866 l\Ir. Burk commenced general store keeping, which he continued 
until 1872. In 1881 he took charge of the Markham Post-office, which 
position he still holds. In July, 1879, he married Miss Lizzie Bell, of 
Brougham; he has one son, Edmund, born January 9, 1882. 


GEORGE JAMES CHAUNCEY was born at St. John's, Newfoundland, in 
November, 1849, and is a descendant of one of the oldest families in 
Britain's oldest colony. Among his predecessors was the first Surveyor- 
General and Clerk of the Peace of the colony; and among his late 
relatives was the late Thomas Knight, Esq., for many years a member of 
the Legislature, one of whose sons still fills the responsible position of 
Acting Secretary of the Board of Works, and a second that of Cashier of 
the Newfoundland Savings Bank. :Mr. Rice, M.H.A., one of the present 
representatives to the Legislature from the electoral district of Notre Dame 
Bay, is also an uncle of 1\1r. Chauncey on his mother's side. Another of 
his uncles lost his life whilst engaged in the public service of the colony; 
whilst the old firm of Goss, Chauncey & Ledgard was one of the most 
substantial commercial houses in Harbour Grace, Conception Bay. One of 
1\Ir. Chauncey's uncles by marriage has been Financial Secretary of the 
Colony for the past eight or ten years. Mr. Chauncey's parents are George 
\Villiam Fletcher Chauncey and Eliza, eldest daughter of the late James 
Rice, Esq., formerly Sheriff of the Northern District of Newfoundland. 
Mrs. Chauncey was born at Twillingate, Notre Dame Bay, in 1828, where 
her husband carried on a general commercial business for some years. Mr. 
George Chauncey is one of seven children, five of whom are still living. 
His earliest days were spent in Notre Dame Bay, where many of the most 
stirring memories of his boyish days were acquired. One of the most 
memorable of these incidents occurred when scarcely fourteen years old- 
his father then being engaged in commercial life at Twillingate. Upon 
that occasion large numbers of seals (Plwca Grælllalldica) had been driven 
into the Bay upon the ice, and George, young as he was, made it his duty 
to join the seal hunters in their raids upon the amphibious animals, and 
always brought home his" haul," when others had cut their lines to save 
their lives. Twice, with his companions, he was carried off upon the floe- 
bergs, to be rescued by a timely boat on one occasion; and upon the other 
escaping to shore over the ice after very considerable exertion, which ended 
in an attack of ice-blindness that lasted for three days. How great the 



Village of .fI.1 arkltam. 


3 1 7 


peril was may be understood when the bodies of five men, who were drifted 
up the bay and lost, were subsequently recovered, frozen to death on the 
floating ice, about fifteen miles from where they started. After receiving a 
very fair and liberal education of the old-time Commercial School class, 
Mr. Chauncey was placed in the printing office of The Public Ledger news- 
paper, then conducted by his uncle, the late lVlr. Henry Winton, in which 
paper he " served his time" out. He afterwards entered the office of The 
St. J n's Daily News, and North Star (weekly), edited and published by 
Mr. Robert Winton, now of Toronto. At this establishment, where from 
some twelve to fifteen years was published the Legislative work of the 
colony, with the Journals of its Legislative Assembly, IVIr. Chauncey 
acquired a pretty thorough knowledge of his business. He remained 
at work there up to the period of hIS departure for Toronto, where he 
was engaged on the Globe, Evening Telegram and in other offices, occa- 
sionally contributing correspondence and other matter to these journals. 
In April, 1880, Mr. Chauncey was married to 
liss Mary Hammond. of 
Brampton, and in the following year was induced to undertake the publi- 
cation of the Markham Suu, in the Village of Markham, York County, 
which paper is still successfully continued by him. In September of last 
year he was appointed Postmaster of Markham, which position he continues 
to fill. In politics Mr. Chauncey is of the Liberal-Conservative school; 
in religion, a Protestant of the Independent or Congregational denomi- 
nation, a connection in which he received his earliest religious training, 
and to which he is still strongly attached. Personally, Mr. Chauncey 
is a gentleman of considerable energy and large experience, and is possessed 
of the best traits characteristic of the stock from which he sprung. He 
has been a warm and zealous exponent of the views and policy of the party 
with which he is associated, and-still a young man-gives fair promise of 
a long future of considerable value to the political interests of the Province 
in which he has taken up his permanent abode. 


WILLIAM CHERRY, retired farmer, was born in Ireland in 1802, and 
emigrated to Canada in 1827. He first worked near Toronto, and engaged 
in lumbering and farming six yéars, and afterwards worked on the Lock- 
port Canal. He then purchased a farm, being part of lots 3 and 4, con- 
cession 3, Markham, and with land adjoining, which he has since bought, 
now owns two hundred and fifty acres. Mr. Cherry is in every sense of 
the word a self-made man; he landed in Toronto without a dollar, and by 
perseverance, energy and pluck has acquired a nice competency. He owns 
a fine residence on lots I and 2, Church Street in Markham Village, on 



3 18 


Biographical Notices. 


which he resides. In 1840 he married Miss Ann Armstrong, whose parents 
came from Ireland; they had ten children, as follow: Jane, born April 
20, 1842; died May I, 1842; l'vlartha, born April 25, 1843; Mary, born 
January 18,1845; John, born October 22, 1846; Thomas, born July 26, 
18 4 8 ; \Villiam, born September 9, IR50; Rebecca, born August 10, 1853 ; 
James, born September 2, 1855; Sarah Jane, born October 3 1 , 1857; and 
Albert, born September 8, 1860, who died September 15, 1860. Thomas, 
Mary and Martha are married. 


A. FLEURY, ironfounder, was born in 1824 on lot 9, concession I, King 
Township, where he remained until 1843. He then went to Newmarket, 
and learned his trade with Mr. Blaker, and, on completing his apprenticeship, 
returned to the farm, and built a shop in which he manufactured threshing 
machines, ploughs, etc. He remained there ten years, after which he 
removed to Aurora, and in connection with his brother, worked there for 
five years. In 1868 he located in Markham Village and rented what was 
known as Todd's old foundry, which was burnt down in 1874. Mr. Fleury 
then rented his present foundry, where he employs from twelve to twenty 
men in the manufacture of agricultural implements. In 1880 he built a fine 
brick residence in the village. He was a member of the Council for four 
years, and is at the present time a Trustee of the Canada Methodist Church. 
In 1848 he married Miss Catharine \Voodard, by whom he had seven 
children, viz.: Agnes, Milton, Arthur, Maria, Seth, Peter and Egbert. 
GEORGE GRAHAM, retired, was born near the City of Carlisle, Cumber- 
land, England, and came to Canada in 1829. He located in Markham 
Township, settling on lot 5, concession 7, where he remained until 18 71. 
He was Sergeant under Captain Barkie, and took part in the Rebellion of 
18 37. In 1855 Mr. Graham bought two hundred acres of land in Uxbridge 
Township, and at present owns fifty acres in the Township of Scott, in 
addition to house and lot in Markham Village where he resides. He" is 
Treasurer of L. O. F. No. 548. He has been twice married, first to Ann 
Sanderson, of Cumberland, England, in 1835, by whom he has four children, 
viz.: Ann, Joseph, Thomas and Dinah. His second marriage took place 
in 1870, his wife being Mrs. Dewhurst, of Uxbridge. 


\VILLIAM HAMILTON HALL, proprietor of the Franklin House, 
Iark- 
ham Village, was born in 1852. His father, the late Mr. Hamilton Hall, 
was a native of Rome, N ew York State, where the family owned a distillery. 
Accompanied by his brother he came to Canada, and settled near the 
Humber, where he died, March 23, 1882, in his seventy-second year. In 



Village of .fI.1 arklzam. 


3 1 9 


1872 William took possession of the Ontario Hotel at Ringwood, and sub- 
sequently built his present large and commodious hotel, 50 x 100 feet and 
two storeys high. In 1872 he married Lavinia Rimdle, of Whitby. 


JOHN JERMAN, waggon manufacturer and blacksmith, TVlarkham Village. 
The enterprising subject of this sketch was born in 1838, being the 
second son of Henry and Ann (Wilson) Jerman. His father came to 
Canada in 1832, and for several years carried on the business of blacksmith 
in Markham, and, under his supervision, John learned the same trade. On 
the retirement from business of the former, the son took it in hand and had 
greatly extended it, having added a furniture manufactory, planing mills 
and waggon works. The factory was burned down in the fall of 1883, but he 
still carried on the blacksmith shop. He is the owner also of considerable 
village property, and may be classed as one of the most prosperous of the 
surrounding community. He was a member of the Council from its incor- 
poration until 1882. In 1873 he married Annie, daughter of Captain Arm- 
strong. His wife died in 1877, and he married a second time, his partner 
being Mary, daughter of Joseph Reesor, of Markham. 


H. C. MARR, grocer, flour and feed merchant, is a native of Markham 
Township, and was born in 1833. His grandfather was one of the first 
settlers east of concession 6 of this township, and came from Pennsylvania, 
United States. On his arrival in Canada, J lIne I, 1800, he remained at 
Niagara one year and then came forward to 
Iarkham. They made the 
journey by means of sleighs drawn by oxen, in which primitive manner 
their worldly goods were conveyed to the place of settlement, that being on 
lot 14, concession 9, which was a Government grant of two hundred acres. 
The subject of this sketch is still owner of one hundred and twenty-five 
acres of the old homestead. They had many hardships to contend with in 
the early days, his grandfather having carried wheat on his back a distance 
of fourteen miles to the German Mills, and on one memorable day before 
Christmas, walked to Toronto for the purpose of obtaining bread and tea, 
and brought home two pounds of tea and seven loaves of bread. He died 
in 1865. The father of our subject held forty acres of the old homestead, 
and purchased fifty acres on the adjoining lot, on which he reared a family 
of six children, as follow: James, Maria (dead), Henry C., Jemima (dead), 
Sarah Ann and Catharine. The father died in 1855. The subject of this 
sketch worked on the farm the ten years following his father's death, when 
he removed to his present location, and started his present business, which 
is a very prosperous one. He has occupied some important public positions, 



3 20 


Biographical Notices. 


among which may be mentioned the Presidency of the l'vlarkham and East 
York Agricultural Societies, and is at present Vice-President; he was 
Assessor and Collector for four years. 
\VILLIAM MARR, hotel proprietor, was born July 19. 1827, on lot 14, 
concession 16, in the Township of :Markham. His father, Joseph Marr, 
was born in Pennsylvania, United States, in 1862. His mother's maiden 
name was Louisa Crosby. His parents are dead. Their family consisted 
of nine children, viz.: \Villiam, Sarah, Manly, Rufus, Ira, Mary, Ann, 
Edward and James. \Villiam remained on the home farm until 1850, and 
then removed to Pickering; he subsequently located in Markham Village, 
and entered the hotel business, which he has since conducted. He married 
in 1847 Harriet Killington, from Yorkshire, England, by whom he has one 
son, Henry, born November 17, 1861. 


THOMAS MORGAN is a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, and came to this 
country with his father, \Villiam Morgan, in 1832. His father bought land 
in Markham Village and erected a blacksmith's shop and other premises, 
the firm being now known as T. & G. Morgan. He is one of a family of 
six children. The father died in 1843, and the mother the preceding year. 


GEORGE PRINGLE, one of the firm of Pringle Brothers, carriage and 
waggon manufacturers, was born in 1841. Some account of his parents is 
given in another sketch. Mr. Pringle has been thrice married, first, March 
9, 186 5, to Catharine Burgess; second, on June 24,1878, to her sister Margaret 
Burgess, third, October 7, 1881, to Martha Widman. He has by his first 
wife two children, \Villard, born October 23, 1866; \Valter Leslie, born 
December 3, 1868; by his second wife he had Lilly Ella, born February 
9, 18 79; Minnie May, born May 13, 1880; by his third wife, who died 
October 20, 1883, he had one daughter, viz.: Nellie Augusta, born Novem- 
ber 24, 1882. 


ROBERT PRINGLE, waggon-maker, was born in Markham in 1837. His 
father, James Pringle, was born in Scotland, and came to Canada in 1832. 
His mother's name was Johanna \Vanless. His parents were married at 
Hogg's Hollow in 1836, and his father removed to Markham the same 
year, where he commenced business. In 1873 his sons Robert and George 
took charge of the business which they have since successfully conducted. 
Their manufactures. include all kinds of cutters, sleighs, waggons, buggies, 
etc., the turn over being about $10,000 per annum, and they employ about 
fifteen men. 1\1r. Pringle has been a member of the Council three years. 



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Village of Markham. 


3 21 


He was twice married, first to Mary Ann White; three children are the 
fruit of this union, Clara, \Villiam and Frank. His second wife was Rosa 
Nighswander by whom he had two sons and one daughter, Charles, Robert 
and Laura. 


F. G. PERCY, livery stable proprietor, was born in Pickering. His 
father emigrated from England in 1832, and was one of the first settlers in 
that district; he took up lot 27, concession 6. His mother's maiden name 
was Elizabeth Young. His parents were married in England, the result 
of their union being eleven children, five of whom only are now living; as 
follow: Rev. \Villiam Percy, of Stouffville; James Percy, J.P., and first 
Deputy-Reeve of Pickering Township; Salvanius, in the express office, 
Port Huron; Uriah, living on the old homestead, and F. G. Percy, the 
subject of this notice. The latter conducts the livery stables at IVlarkham 
Village, and owns a number of first-class rigs; he also owns a part (fifty- 
three and a-half acres) of the old homestead. He is a County Constable, 
and a Councillor in the Village of Markham. 


FREDERICK A. REESOR was born on lot 8, concession 8, Markham 
Township, 1844. He attended school and worked on the farm until 1863, 
and then went to college where he graduated in 1807. He is a silver 
medallist in mathematics; one year subsequent to leaving college he held 
a position in the Royal Canadian Bank, and from 1872 until 1874 he was 
teacher in the High School. In the last-named year he was appointed to 
the management of the Markham Branch of the Standard Bank-a position 
he still retains. In 1872 he married Catharine, daughter of the Rev. James 
Bain; they have three children: Kate Eliza, born 1875; James D., born 
1880; and Emily Bain, born 1884' Mr. Reesor has been a Sunday school 
superintendent for fourteen years. 
HENRY B. REESOR was born on lot 12, concession 9 of Markham 
in 1846, and is the son of Christian G. Reesor, who was also born in this 
township. His mother was Susan Burkholder, of Vaughan Township. 
Our subject was educated at the Common and Grammar Schools; attending 
the former until eighteen years of age; the latter for two years. In 1867 
he married Miss Jennie Dack, by whom he has five children, viz.: Ella 
Augusta, born 1868; Laura Gertrude, born 1871; Walter Douglass, born 
1876; Maud Ethel, born 1880; and Nora Edith Beatrice, born 1882. 
After his marriage Mr. Reesor lived five years on the farm, and then 
removed to Markham Village, and engaged in the business of conveyancer, 
general financial and insurance agent, etc. 
22 



3 22 


Biof[raphical Notices. 


JAMES ROBINSON, tanner, was born on the north-east corner of Bay 
and King Streets, Toronto, in 1804-, and came to Markham with his father 
(who was from Pennsylvania, V.S.) in 1
05. He was the eldest son in 
a family of five children; his father and grandfather were tanners, which 
business James followed. In 1854 he commenced on his own account. 
He has occupied several public positions, notably the office of Reeve from 
1868 to 1872; Councillor from 1874 to 1878; he was \i\T arden of the 
county in 1877, and has also been Deputy-Reeve. In 1863 he married 
Louise Ashbridge, of Toronto, by whom he has five children, viz.: John 
Franklin, \Villiam Armstrong, Edward \Vheeler, Jennie and Clara. 


DR. \VESLEY ROBINSON was born on lot 13, concession 8, of this 
township, in 1850, and is the son of Andrew Robinson, who was born on 
the same farm in 1820. He studied at McGill College, :i\Iontreal, where 
he graduated in 1872. He commenced the practice of his profession at 
V xbridge, and from there came to Markham, after a short stay of six 
months, where he has continued to reside. He has been a member of the 
Council and School Trustee. Dr. Robinson married Arvilla Elizabeth, 
daughter of Dr. Freel, of Stouffville, by whom he has two children, viz. : 
Bertram, born 1872, and Ada, born 1879. 


HENRY ROBINSON, merchant, was born in Markham Village in 1849, 
where he was educated. In 1873 he opened a general store on the west 
side of Main Street, where he continued to carryon his business until 
1882. He then moved to a building opposite, and with a well-stocked 
store is doing a successful trade. He is a member of the Council, and 
has been a Churchwarden for three years. In 1868 he married Miss 
Sophia Burke, by whom he has had the following children, viz.: Harry 
Crickson, born May 26, 1869, died October 22, 1874; John 0., born 
November 3, 18 7 2 ; Joseph Hilliard, born July 29, 1875; Eva Sophia, born 
December 10, 1877. 


J AMES SPEIGHT, one of the largest waggon manufacturers in the Prov- 
ince of Ontario, was born in Markham, August 30, 1830. His father, 
Thomas Speight, emigrated from Yorkshire, England, and took up his 
residence in the Southern States. He remained there but a short time, 
and came from there to Canada, settling in the Village of Markham, and 
in 1840 established the waggon manufactory which bears his name. James 
went to school until he was fifteen years of age, and then worked with his 
father. In 1877 a fire destroyed the whole factory, which was rebuilt in the 



Village of 111" arkham. 


3 2 3 


amazingly short period of thirty days. The main building is 244 x 52 feet; 
the showroom 100 x 32 feet; in connection with the factory is also a 
planIng mill and sash and door shop. The annual turnover is about 
$ I 50,000, and goods are exported to the North - West as well as other 
portions of the Dominion, in addition to a large local trade. Mr. Speight 
was the first Reeve of Markham Village, held the Reeveship for ten years 
consecutively, and has besides held the office of Councillor, High School 
Trustee, and Secretary and Treasurer of the Township Agricultural Society. 
He is also a Mason and an Oddfellow. He has been twice married, having 
in 1855 espoused Miss Mary Crosby of Markham Township, who died in 
1876; by her he had the following children, viz.: Arthur A., born July 9. 
1856, died May 2, 1882; Harriet Amelia, born October 28, 1858, died 
December 25, 1859; Elizabeth l'v1aud May, born September 10, 1860, died 
June 7, 1881 ; Martha Helen, born October 20, 1863; Jennie Crosby, born 
November 19, 1865; Joseph James, born November II, 1868; Annette L. 
Gertrude, born January 29, 1871 ; Frank Herbert, born February 25, 1873 ; 
Henry Howard, born November 22, 1875. His second wife was Helen, the 
sister of his deceased wife. 


G. R. VANZANT is descended from a family of U. E. Loyalists, his 
grandfather, Garrett Vanzant, having emigrated from New York State, and 
settled in concession 10 of Markham. He is one of a family of seven 
children; his father's name was \i\Tilliam. He was first employed on a 
farm at Uxbridge in 1853, and afterwards went to the United States. In 
1860 he removed to Toronto where he stayed two years, subsequently 
conducting a general hardware business in the Village of Stouffville. He 
sold out there in 1869 and located on his present premises in Markham
 
where he carried on a successful business. He is also the owner of ten 
acres of land and the residence built by the Hon. D. Reesor in 1874. He 
at present holds the position of Reeve, and has been Councillor and 
School Trustee. Among other important offices which he holds are 
Master of Lodge No. 87, A. F. and A. M., G. R. Canada; President of 
the Speight Manufacturing Company, and President of the Reform Asso- 
ciation. In 1861 he married Miss Catharine Nadier, by whom he has 
five children, Eva 1., Victor Edward, William Clifford, Frank Nicholas, 
and Clarence N. 


J OSEPH WALES, carriage-maker, was born in 1836. In 1844 he went 
to Erie County, New York State, and at the expiration of seven years 
returned to Markham, and worked for his brother, William H. R. Wales. at 



3 2 4 


Biographical Notices. 


the trade of carriage building. At the end of eleven months he left him and 
worked for some time afterwards in the sash and door factory of Messrs. 
\V. & J. Hicks. He subsequently journeyed to California, and after 
remaining there close upon three years, returned to Markham and again 
entered the employment of his brother. In 1872 he began business for 
himself as carriage and waggon builder. In October, 1852, Mr. Wales 
married Anna R. Scott, of this township; they had two daughters, Henri- 
etta, born 1853, and Gertrude, born 1864, died 1866. He has been a 
member of the Council for two years. 


VAN B. WOODRUFF, saddle and harness-maker, was born in Brougham, 
March 15, 1860, being the son of Powell and Ruth Ann (Merrit) Woodruff, 
whose family consisted of six children. J\fr. Woodruff first commenced 
business in Brougham, where he stayed two years, after which he purchased 
his present premises (formerly owned by Mr. G. M. Digby), and has a good 
business. He keeps a general stock of harness, saddles, whips, valises, 
trunks, etc. 


WASHINGTON G. WOODRUFF, livery stable proprietor, was born in 
Brougham in 1856, and is one of a family of five children born to Nelson 
and Margaret (Barnum) Woodruff. He remained at home until 1873, and 
then removed to Pickering, and was employed as buyer in the firm of 
W. & J. Spinks, millers and grain merchants. He stayed at Pickering 
three years, and then removed to Brant County, where he conducted a 
bakery, selling out at the end of four months. The next four months he 
spent at Michipicoton Island, carriage painting, and subsequently came back 
to his native village, where he established a bakery which he carried on for 
a little over a year. He purchased his present business from Mr. Marshall 
in February, 1883. He married Miss Nellie Reid, of Brougham. 


T. F. WOOTTEN was born in Wiltshire, England, in 1843, and emi- 
grated to Canada with his parents, David and Eliza (Clifford) Wootten, 
who settled in Markham in 1856. He is one of a family of nine children, 
five of whom only are living, and conducts the business formerly owned by 
his brother. He holds a contract for conveyance of Her Majesty's Mails, 
and is also pound keeper of the Village of Markham. He was married to 
Sarah] ane Brooks, daughter of the late Mr. Jacob Brooks, by whom he has 
two children, Ellen D. and Alna A. Eliza Elizabeth. It should be stated 
that Mr. Jacob Brooks carried the first mail from Toronto to Markham 
right through to Uxbridge and Mariposa Township, which he continued for 



Village of Markham. 


3 2 5 


over twenty-one years. He was a native of Devizes, \Viltshire, England, 
and came to Canada before the War of 1812-'14, in which he took a part. 
During the Rebellion of 1838 his son, Peter, now deceased, carried the 
mails at the time they were stolen by the Rebels. The sword is in the 
possession of the family which was carried by Mr. Brooks at the time. He 
was a man highly respected and very upright in all his dealings. He was 
a strong Conservative in politics. 


? 
 
- ';æ 
b' 



TOWNSHIP OF VAUGHAN. 



TO\VNSHIP OF VAUGHAN. 



- 


, . 
EORGE AGAR, lot 28, concession ro, was born in tbis township 
.
{ 
 on lot 19, concession 10, in the year 1842. He is the eldest son 

J 
 of Mr. Richard Agar, who now resides at \Veston. The latter 
t


 emigrated from Yorkshire, England, about 18 3 6 , and settled on 
,,

3 lot 33, concession 9, Vaughan Township, which he cleared. He 
Æ
 took an active part in the church matters of the township, and 
was for many years a class leader. George Agar was married 
to Mary Ann Bingham in 1866. His wife is a daughter of Mr. Andrew 
Bingham, of Etobicoke. Their family consists of seven children. He 
belongs to the Methodist persuasion, and is a Reformer in politics. 


TAMES ADAMS, lot 26, concession 7, is a native of Ireland, having been 
born in County Tyrone in the year 1807. He emigrated to Canada in 1832, 
and immediately purchased the one hundred acres of lane! where he now 
lives. The country around him was then quite wild and he had very few 
neighbours. He was a member of the first Township Council. Mr. Adams 
was married in the year 1834 to Sarah Irwin, the issue of the union being 
seven children. He has one son, Mr. \Villiam Adams, in Toronto. He 
belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and his political views are in accord- 
ance with those of the Conservative Party. 


WILLIAM BASINGTWAIT, lot 22, concession 2, was born in the County 
of Norfolk, England, in the year 1816. He came to Canada in company 
with his parents and the other members of the family in the year r832. 
They came first to York County, but shortly afterwards moved into Ontario 
County, where the father purchased a farm in Reach Township, on which 
he lived until his death. In 1843 our subject settled in the Township of 
Vaughan on the farm still occupied by him, which, when he first located 



33 0 


Biographical Notices. 


there, was complete bush; neither were there churches, schools or roads. 
Mr. Basingtwait, in addition to farming his land, is much interested III 
bee-culture, having no less than thirty-five hives, which are very productive 
and yield a profitable return. He was married in the year 1835 to Mrs. 
Margaret Atkinson; they have a family of six children living. He belongs 
to the Methodist Church, and is in political opinions a Reformer. 


\VILLlAM BOLTER, lot 29, concession 7, is a native of Suffolk, England. 
He was born in I8IS, and emigrated to Canada in 1859 accompanied by 
his wife and two sons. He came direct to Toronto, where he remained two 
years, being at the end of that period employed by Mr. Philip Armstrong, 
on Y onge Street. He worked for that gentleman a bout nine years, and then 
rented a farm on concession 3 of York Township, which he only occupied 
about one year. He then rented the farm where he now resides. He was 
married about six years previously to his departure from England, his wife's 
maiden name being Louisa King; they have a family of two sons and four 
daughters. He belongs to the Episcopal Church. 


ANTHONY BOWES, lot 3, concession 2, was born in the" Township of 
Vaughan, on the farm where he still lives. He is the youngest son of the 
late Anthony Bowes, and was born in the year 1835. Mr. Bowes, sen'r, 
emigrated from Yorkshire, England, accompanied by his wife and family, 
and settled upon the above-mentioned farm. He continued to cultivate his 
land for many years, and having had a moderate share of success he retired 
in favour of his son and went to live in Toronto. He remained there three 
or four years and then returned to Thornhill, where he died in the year 18 7 0 . 
:\Ir. Anthony Bowes married in 1857 Catharine Gillivray, of Scotch parent- 
age, being a daughter of Mr. john Gillivray; they had a family of eleven 
children, all living but one. He is a member of the Methodist Church, and 
a Conservative in politics. 


\VILLlAM BOWES, lot 7, concession 2, was born in England in the year 
1818, and in company with his parents and other members of the family- 
three brothers and two sisters-came to Canada in 1831. They landed at 
Quebec, the journey from there to Montreal being made by steamboat. 
From the latter city to Brockville they journeyed by Durham boats, and the 
remainder of the trip to little York by schooner. His father was the late 
Anthony Bowes, mentioned in another sketch, he being the eldest son of 
the family. 
1r. Bowes bears testimony to the extreme badness of the 
roads in the early days of the settlement, although he admits the existence 
of one of the prime elements of civilization, to wit, an old log school-house. 



Township of Vaughan. 


33 1 


During the Rebellion of 1837 he was a member of Captain Gapper's troop, 
and served during that time. Mr. Bowes married in 1844 Ann Maxwell, by 
whom he had ten children, seven only of whom 
e living. He belongs to 
the Methodist Church, and in politics is a Reformer. The day the fight took 
place at Montgomery's Tavern, l'v1r. Bowes was engaged at his father's 
farm on lot 3, concession 2 of King, butchering hogs. While they were 
so employed six of the Rebels rode up on horseback and demanded that our 
subject and his companion should go with them and swell the force under 
Mackenzie's command, but they refused to comply. The Rebels shortly 
afterwards went away, leaving word that they would return and should 
then expect their wishes to be respected. This threat was no vain one, at 
least so far as their return was concerned; but for making unwilling men 
go where they had no desire was another matter. They put up their horses, 
"blackmailed" for food and then commenced to threaten what would hap- 
pen unless he went with them. Happily perhaps for all parties, before 
violence could be used, the Rebels, by some unexplained means, became 
aware of the defeat of Mackénzie on Y onge Street, and at once mounting 
their horses galloped away. The horses were afterwards found straying; 
they belonged to people around Eglington, and one, a very valuable mare, 
was owned by Sheriff Jarvis. 


JOSEPH BROWN, lot 3, concession 5, was born in Vaughan Township on 
lot 2, concession 5. His father was the late James Brown, mentioned else- 
where. Joseph was the fifth son in order in his father's family. He has 
been twice married, first in the year 1844, to Catharine Burkholder, by 
whom he had a family of nine children, most of whom are dead. His 
second marriage took place in 1881 to l'v1iss Troyer. He is an adherent of 
the Methodist Church, and is a Conservative in politics. His son Henry 
now occupies his farm, lot 3, concession 6, and is the only son living; two 
daughters are living, Susannah and Ca.tharine, the latter being married to 
Jacob Quartz. 


RICHARD BROWN, lot 2, concession 5, was born on the lot where he now 
resides in the year 1822. His father, the late James Brown, was among 
the first batch of settlers in Vaughan, having emigrated some years before 
the War of 1812. He was a man much esteemed by his neighbours, and 
was ever ready to bring his experience to bear in assisting new settlers in 
their difficulties. He was a l\Iennon i te in religion, but afterwards joined the 
Methodist Church. Richard married in the year 1843. His wife's maiden 
name was Rebecca Burkholder, who was born in Vaughan Township, being 



33 2 


Biographical Notices. 


a daughter of the late \Villiam Burkqolder, who was a soldier during the 
\Var of 1812. They have a family of nine children living, and two dead. 
He is an adherent of the Methodist Church, and a Conservative in politics. 


JAMES BRYSON, lot 30, concession 6, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 
in the year 1794. He learned the trade of a machinist in Glasgow, at 
which business he worked about eighteen years. In 1832 he emigrated 
to Canada, and shortly afterwards settled in Vaughan. He married in 1835 
Jane McCallum, daughter of the late Donald :\lcCallum, who had charge of 
the post-office in concession 6 of King Township. They had a family of 
one son and seven daughters; the daughters are all married and reside in 
different parts of the county, the son living with his father on the farm. 
His wife died October 31, 1882. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, and has always been a Reformer in politics. 


JOSEPH BURKHOLDER, lot 3, concession 4, Edgely Post-office, is the 
youngest son of the late \Villiam Burkholder. His father was a native of 
the State of Maryland, and was ten years of age when he came to Canada 
with his parents. During the vVar of 1812 he was captain of a company in 
the militia. He moved on to the farm now occupied by his son Joseph in 
the beginning of 1816, and continued there until his death in 1869. At the 
time of the Rebellion of 1837, Mr. Burkholder's impulsive yet withal 
generous nature was somewhat imposed upon as the following incident will 
show. He became security for the appearance of a number of Rebels, but 
they, either through fear of the consequences, or from 'other motives, were 
not forthcoming when wanted, which had the effect of placing Mr. Burk- 
holder in a somewhat difficult position. He, however, came through his 
trouble all right, the authorities possibly concluding that no blame could be 
attached to him. Joseph Burkholder was born on the old homestead. He 
was married III 1852 to Miss Hannah Koake, daughter of Adam Koake, 
late of Etobicoke Township. They have a family of nine children living, 
two being dead. Mr. Burkholder is a Presbyterian, but his family attend 
the Methodist Church. He is a Conservative in politics. The farm which 
he owns was originally purchased from the Clergy Reserve. 


ROBERT BURTON, lot 13, concession 9, was born in the year 1852 on 
the lôt which he now owns and cultivates. He is the youngest son of the 
late Henry Burton, who was one of the earliest settlers in this part of 
Vaughan, and was a man well known in the neighbourhood. Mr. Burton, 
sen'r, was originally from Scotland, and on emigrating to Canada settled 
first in little York, removing to Vaughan in the year 1834, where he resided 



TOWllship of Vaughan. 


333 


until his death in 1881, at the age of seventy-five years. Robert Burton 
married in 1860 Margaret Lawrence, daughter of 1\1r. Isaac Lawrence, of 
Toronto Gore, by whom he has three children. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, and is a Reformer in politics. 


\VILLIAM BURTON, lot 2, concession 9, was born in Toronto Township 
in the year 1828, being the eldest son of the late Robert Burton, who was 
well known and respected in Vaughan and the surrounding townships. 
The latter emigrated from Roxburghshire, Scotland, in the year 1824. He 
was a stone-mason by trade, and on settling in Toronto assisted in building 
the old Upper Canada Bank, as well as some other notable erections. He 
married Violet Oliver (who is still living) and settled in Vaughan in 1830. 
In 1852 he purchased land in Albion and King Townships, and lived on his 
farm in the last named section until his death in 1870, at the age of seventy 
years. William having been brought up to farming has always followed 
that occupation. He belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and is a Reformer 
I 
in politics. He is not married. 


\VILLIAM BURTON, lot 4, concession 9, was born in little York, now 
Toronto, in the year 1830, and is the eldest son of his father's family. The 
latter was Mr. Henry Burton, who emigrated from Roxburghshire, Scotland, 
in 1830; he was a stone-mason by trade, which he followed for two years 
after his arrival. He helped to build the first Market-place, and Osgoode 
Hall in Toronto. In 1832 he located on lot 13, concession 9, and settled 
down to farming, which he continued until his death in 1881, at the ripe 
age of seventy-seven years. He was a Trustee of the Presbyterian Church, 
and joined the first congregation formed in the locality. Mr. William 
Burton espoused in 1860, Jane, a daughter of Neil McDonald, by whom he 
has four children. He is a member of the Presbyterian body, and in politics 
a Reformer. 


ARCHIBALD CAMERON, lot 17, concession 6, was born in Caledon Town- 
ship, Peel County, in the year 1826, and is the eldest son of the late Donald 
Cameron. His father was a native of Argyleshire, Scotland, whose early 
years were spent in tending cattle on the mountain pastures of his native 
county. He emigrated to Canada in 1819, but previous to his departure 
married Elizabeth Armour, who accompanied him, and heroically endured 
the severe hardships which they afterwards encountered. They landed 
after their voyage in Montreal on August 2 I, and immediately commenced 
the long and tedious journey to Peel County, where they proposed to settle. 
After several delays which occurred at different points on the route, and 



334 


Biographical Notices. 


the additional misery of having sickness on board the boat, they arrived at 
their destination about the latter end of October, and it appeared as though 
they had not reached the final stage of despondency. They received their 
grant of sixty acres in the Township of Caledon; but were compelled owing 
to the sparsity of settlement to sleep out in the woods for several nights 
without shelter, not being able to build a shanty for want of the necessary 
assistance. Mr. Cameron contrived however by perseverance, and the 
consolation which his deep religious convictions afforded him, to overcome 
innumerable obstacles and to emerge from his state of wretchedness to one 
of comparative comfort. He remained in Caledon Township about seven 
years, and then removed to Vaughan, where he lived until the time of his 
death. During his lifetime he took great interest in municipal affairs, and 
was in the Township Council for some years. He was an Elder of the 
Presbyterian Church. Archibald Cameron took charge of the homestead 
at his father's death, which he has since continued to cultivate. He married 
in 1851 Catharine McMurchell, by whom he has a family of eight children. 
He is an Elder of the Presbyterian Church, and a Conservative in politics. 


LACKLEN CAMERON, lot 12, concession 10, was born in the Island of 
Mull, Argyleshire, Scotland, in 1830. In company with his parents he 
emigrated to Canada in 1856, who settled in the Township of Saugeen, 
Bruce County, where they remained about one year, subsequently remov- 
ing to the Township of Bruce, where they secured one hundred acres of 
land, which the subject of this sketch still owns. He rented a farm in 
Vaughan Township, on which he lived about seven years, and at the expira- 
tion of that time purchased the farm where he now resides. He is also 
the owner of an additional fifty acres in another part of the township. He 
married Margaret, a daughter of the late Archibald Sommerville, of this 
township; they have a family of seven childr
n. Mr. Cameron is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and a Reformer in politics. 


l 


JOHN CHAPMAN, lot 37, concession I, is the descendant of aU. E. 
Loyalist family who emigrated from the State of New York at an early 
day. Our subject was born in 1804, and came with his mother and 
stepfather to Canada; the latter drew land from Government, the same 
now occupied by Isaac and James Chapman. The first settlement was 
made on the farm now owned by Mr. Arnold, which was the first 
farm cleared on YOllge Street. Mr. Chapman was married in 1826 to 
Hannah Pearson, of English parentage, by whom he had twelve children. 
The family generally belong to the Presbyterian Church, but some of the 
sons are Methodists. Mr. Chapman takes an active part in politics, and 



TOWJlship of Vaughan. 


335 


votes for measures rather than party. As U. E. Loyalists the family retain 
the patriotic spirit which animated their forefathers, and the evidence they 
have shown of their firm adherence to the Crown is to them a source of 
considerable pride. 


JAMES CHERRY, lot 32, concession 9, was born in Vaughan Township, 
on the lot where he now lives, in 1838. He is the only son of the late John 
Cherry, one of the earliest settlers in this part of Vaughan, who emigrated 
from County Down, Ireland, and settled in this township about the year 
1834. James married Elizabeth, daughter of the late Samuel Sheardon, of 
this township, by whom he has five children, all girls. The family are 
adherents of the Lutheran Church, and in politics 1\1r. Cherry votes Con- 
servative. He takes considerable interest in stock-raising, and last year 
imported two of the Clydesdale breed of horses, and in other matters shows 
his enterprise and judgment. 


WILLIAM CONSTABLE, lot 16, concession 6, was born in Yorkshire, 
England, in the year 1815. He emigrated to Canada in company with his 
step-father, \Villiam J arolt, in the year 1830. He remained in the lumber- 
ing districts of Quebec Province about six years and then moved west to 
York County and settled in the Township of Vaughan. He rented a farm 
on lot 21, concession 6, where he stayed five years, after which he bought 
his present farm. He lived on lot 20, concession 5, about four years, and 
returned to lot 16, concession 6, on which he had erected buildings and 
where he yet resides. He married in 1830 Mary Jackson, daughter of the 
late George Jackson, of York Township; they have a family of two children 
living. He is an adherent of the Lutheran Church, and a Reformer in 
politics. 


G. J. COOK, lot 28, concession 3, was born at Caarville, Vaughan 
Township, June 7, 18 5 2 . He is the youngest son of the late Thomas Cook, 
a very early settler in this section. His father located on lot 16, concession 
2, which he farmed, and in addition carried on a large business as merchant 
miller. He gave up business here and went to New Zealand, with the 
intention of permanently settling there; but not liking the country, he 
returned to Canada, and again fixing his residence in Vaughan, died there 
in the year 1877, leaving his property to his sons. Two of the sons reside 
at Caarville. J. G. Cook was married in the year 1876 to Jane Denton, 
daughter of William Denton. now living in Mono Township, County Duf- 
ferin, formerly of Vaughan. They have a family of two sons. He belongs 
to the Methodist Church, and in politics supports the Reform Party. 



33 6 


Biographical Notices. 


THOMAS COOK, lot 16, concession 2, is the son of the late Thomas Cook, 
of English birth, who emigrated to America in the year 1830. l'v1r. Cook, 
sen'r, first settled in the United States, and coming afterwards to Canada 
he settled in the Township of Vaughan, where he located on a portion of 
what was known as the old" Fisher Estate." He purchased six hundred 
acres, which he divided with his brother William, and where, in connection 
with farming they operated a grist-mill which was already on the land, 
being the first mill erected in the township. They did a very large business, 
having the monopoly of the trade in the section. lV1r. Cook took consider- 
able interest in the affairs of the township and was for a number of years a 
member of the Council. He was a Justice of the Peace for some time pre- 
vious to his death, in which position he discharged his duties with much 
discrimination and judgment. In church matters he was ever to the fore, 
and the Methodist body, of which he was an earnest member, in many 
instances received substantial proof of his devotion to the cause of the 
Gospel. He died in the year 1877 on the old homestead, after a long and 
successful career, and a life of usefulness to the public weal. Thomas, 
who now resides on the home farm where he was born, is the second 
son of his father's family. He married in the year 1879 Elizabeth Ann 
Bell, a Canadian by birth, by whom he has two children. He is a consist- 
ent member of the Methodist Church, and in political opinions gives his 
support to the Reform Party. 


\VILLIAM COOK, lot 16, concession 2, was born on lot 17, adjoining the 
farm upon which he now resides, and is the eldest of the three sons of the 
late Thomas Cook mentioned in a previous biography. \Villiam married 
in 18]2 Mercie Ellerby, daughter of 1\1r. Joseph Ellerby, of Markham Town- 
ship. The family are adherents of the Methodist Church. Mr. Cook has 
been a member of the Vaughan Township Council for four years, and is 
now Deputy-Reeve. In political matters he is a Reformer. 


GEORGE COOPER, lot 25, concession 8, was born in Lincolnshire, Eng- 
land, in the year 1843, and emigrated with his parents to Canada in 1854- 
His father, the late John Cooper, settled on his arrival in concession 2 of 
Markham Township, where he remained about one year. He subsequently 
removed to Thornhill, where he died, after a residence of eight months. His 
wife, the mother of our subject, lived in Thornhill about twenty years after 
the death of her husband, and is still living in Vaughan with her son, being 
now about eighty years old. Mr. George Cooper was married in 1868, the 
maiden name of his wife being Fanny \Vells; they have seven children. 



Township of Vaughan. 337 


He has taken little or no active part in local affairs. He belongs to the 
Episcopal Church, and is a Conservative in politics. 


JOHN COWAN, blacksmith, Purpleville, was born in the Township of 
Vaughan, in 1862. He is the second son of Mr. John Cowan who laid out 
the Village of Purpleville, and for a number of years carried on a black- 
smith's business there, having since removed to the United States. Our 
subject has lived the greater portion of his life across the border. He 
learned his trade at Teston with l\Ir. Richard Lund, and has since com- 
menced business at Purpleville, which, there is good reason for believing, 
is a successful one. 


JOHN CRADDOCK was born in the Township of Vaughan, within a 
short distance of his present residence. His father was a native of Y ork- 
shire, England, his mother was from Lincolnshire, England. His parents 
came to Canada in 1831, and located on lot 29, concession 4, where he 
conducted a lumbering business in addition to farming for a number of 
years. They were among the early settlers of Vaughan, and the old 
people are still alive and reside in the town of Barrie. Mr. Craddock, jun'r, 
was married in the year 1861, his wife's maiden name being Elizabeth Nixon, 
daughter of Mr. \Villiam Nixon, of concession 4 of Vaughan. The family 
are adherents of the 11ethodist Church, and are all Reformers in politics. 


ROBERT CREIGHTON, lot 10, concession 10, was born near Glasgow, 
Scotland, in the year 1813, and emigrated to Canada in 1828 in company 
with his father, his mother being dead. They came 'l.'Ùl New York, where 
they remained a few months, and subsequently made their way to Little 
York. They se,ttled down in Toronto where they lived eleven years, and 
then moved up Y onge Street, and located for over nine years on the spot 
where Davisville now stands. In the year 1841, Mr. Creighton, sen'r, 
purchased the farm now in the possession of his son Robert, where he 
resided until his death, which took place in 1883, at the age of seventy. seven 
years. Robert was married in the year 1846 to Jane Stewart, she being 
a daughter of the late Henry Stewart, of Toronto. They have on
 son. 
In politics Mr. Creighton is a Reformer. 


ROBERT CROFT, lot 28, concession 8, is a native of Lincolnshire, Eng- 
land. He was born in 1810, and in 1831 emigrated to Canada accompanied 
by his wife and one child. He came direct to York County, and settled at 
Thornhill, where he worked for three or four years. He then removed to 
Vaughan Township, where he spent three years, and subsequently lived 
23 



33 8 


Biograpltical Notices. 


nine years in :M.arkham. At the end of that time he purchased a farm in 
the latter township, on lot 4, concession 4, where he resided about twelve 
years. He ultimately bought the property in Vaughan where he now lives. 
He has been twice married; by his first wife he had eleven children. He 
is a member of the Methodist Church, and a Conservative in politics. 


J AMES DALZIEL is the son of the late John Dalziel, who emigrated from 
Lanarkshire, Scotland, with his family in 1828, and immediately on his 
arrival in York, settled in the Township of Vaughan, on lot I, concession 5, 
where he lived until his death in 1842. James was born in Scotland in 
1816, and on the death of his father occupied the old homestead. He has 
benefited the Township of Vaughan considerably by the introduction of a 
fine stock of Durham and Shorthorn cattle, and has also infused much 
spirit into the working and aims of the Agricultural Society. He has taken 
a number of prizes for ploughing, and may be classed as the best plough- 
man in the section. He has a brother also who is a first-class ploughman. 
The farm he lives on was originally owned by the late John Smith, who 
afterwards built mills at Pine Grove. Mr. Dalziel rents his farm and only 
retains a few acres, living now in retirement. He married in 1872, his 
wife's maiden name being Janet McLean, a native of Scotland, by whom 
he had four children, two boys and two girls. He is a Presbyterian in 
religion, and a Reformer in politics. 


JAMES DEVINS, lot 18, concession 10, was born in concession 6 of 
York Township in the year 1804. He is descended from a family who 
originally emigrated to Canada from Pennsylvania, U. S., his father, the 
late Isaac Devins, landing at the mouth of the River Don with Governor 
Simcoe, whose tent he assisted to put up. Mr. Isaac Devins located in the 
Township of Markham, but not being satisfied he came to concession 6 
of York Township, where he subsequently died, being over eighty years 
of age. In the early days the settlers had to go to the head of the lake in 
scows to have their grist ground. The first saw-mill built on the Humber 
was erected by an uncle of our subject, and was put up by order of the 
Government. James Devins moved from York into Vaughan Township at 
an early period of settlement, there being at that time less than half-a-dozen 
dwelling-houses between Toronto and Vaughan. Our subject married in 
1830, his wife's maiden name being Eleanor Christner: their family con- 
sisted of 
ine children. In politics Mr. Devins has taken a somewhat 
active part, and at election times has given great assistance to the Reform 
party. He belongs to the Methodist persuasion. 



TO'lV1lship of Vaughan. 


339 


GEORGE ELLIOTT, lot I I, concession 8, was born on the farm where he 
now resides. He is the eldest son of the late John Elliott, an old settler in 
Vaughan, who emigrated from Northumberland, England, at an early day. 
1\1r. Elliott, sen'r, remained two years in l\Iontreal, and subsequently spent 
a similar period in Toronto. In 1834 he purchased a farm in Vaughan, 
where he continued to live till his death in 1869, at the age of sixty-nine 
years. He belonged to the Congregational Church, and was a Reformer in 
politics. George Elliott married, in 1860, Elizabeth, daughter of the late 
George Gowland, of this township: they have a family of seven children. 
In religion and politics he follows in the footsteps of his father. 


RICHARD EGAN, lot 33, concession 8, was born in the County Monaghan, 
Ireland, in the year 1831, being the youngest son of the late Johnston Egan. 
His father emigrated to Canada, accompanied by his children (the mother 
being dead), in the year 1831, and settled in Vaughan as soon as possible 
after his arrival in York. He purchased land from the Canada Company, 
lot 3 I, concession 7, which he occupied for three years, at the expiration of 
which time he sold out and bought the farm where his son, the subject of 
this sketch, lives. He died in the year 1858, being about fifty-five years of 
age. Richard took possession of the old homestead, which he has continued 
to cultivate, and where he has brought up his family. He was married to 
Jane, a daughter of the late Joseph Hempsall, of this township: they have 
nine children living. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and is 
a Conservative in politics. 


JOHN H. ELLIS, lot 32, concession 8, was born in the County of Notting- 
hamshire, England, in the year 1830. He came out to this country with 
his parents when an infant. His father located on the farm now occupied 
by his son, which he cleared and otherwise improved. He lived to the ripe 
old age of eighty-one years, his death taking place in the year 1882. John 
H. Ellis was married in 1863, his wife being Sophia Josephine, daughter of 
the late Abraham Crossen: they have a family of four children. He belongs 
to the Lutheran Church, and is a Conservative in politics. 


\VILLIAM \V. FARR, lot 5, concession 9, was born in the Township of 
Chinguacousy, County Peel, in the year 1830. His father, the late James 
Farr, emigrated from the neighbourhood of Weston, Herts, England, at an 
early day, and settled first in Weston, where he stayed until 1829. He it 
was who gave to the Village of \Veston its title, in commemoration of his 
English home. On leaving Weston he went to Peel County, and at the 
expiration of twelve months moved into Vaughan Township, on the same 



34 0 


Biograpltical Notices. 


farm where \Villiam, his son, now lives. He resided there until his death, 
which took place in 1841, at the age of fifty-three years: his widow is still 
living, being eighty-one years old. Mr. Farr, sen'r, held a Captain's com- 
mission in the militia. \V. \V. Farr has been twice married: first in 1850 
to Eliza Fletcher, by whom he had one child. His second uuion was with 
a daughter of the late John \Villiams, an old settler who lived to be ninety 
years of age. He has four children by his present wife. Mr. Farr has 
been a member of the \Voodbridge Village Council for three years, a position 
he still holds. He belongs to the Methodist Church, and is a Conservative 
in politics. 


EDWARD FLETCHER, lot 9, concession 8, was born on the lot on which 
he now resides. His father, the late \Valter Fletcher, was an early settler 
in the township, having located here in 1826. He was a native of County 
Leitrim, Ireland, and after settling on his farm in Vaughan remained there 
until his death in 1869, at the age of seventy-nine years. Edward was born 
in 1837, and is the youngest son of his father's family, which consisted of 
three sons and two daughters. Mr. Fletcher is unmarried. He is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics is a Conservative. 


JOSEPH GRAHAM, lot 18, concession 2, is a native of Vaughan Township, 
and was born on concession 2, in 1840, being the second son of the late 
William Graham, an old settler in this section. He (l\Ir. Graham, sen'r) 
was a cooper by trade, and followed that business for many years at 
York Mills, and subsequently in Vaughan, and was widely known through- 
out the district as a hard-working, industrious man. The members of his 
family are located within a few miles radius, and are all farmers. Joseph 
Graham was married in the year 1877 to Louisa Frank, by whom he has 
a family of two, both boys. He belongs to the Methodist denomination, 
and votes for the Reform Pårty at elections. 


MICHAEL HARVEY, lot 26, concession 6, is a native of County Tyrone, 
where he was born in 1829. His father being dead, he, accompanied by his 
mother and other members of the family, came to Canada in 1850. They 
came direct to Vaughan, and settled on the adjoining lot on which he now 
lives. He moved on to the present lot in 1862, which he continues to 
cultivate. 


\VILLIAM HEMPHILL, lot 33, concession 9, was born in County Tyrone, 
Ireland, in the year 1831. He emigrated to Canada, in company with his 
parents, in 1841. They came direct to York County, and almost immediately 



Towns/zip of Vaughan. 


34 1 


took up their abode in Vaughan Township, on the same farm now occupied 
by \Villiam. He is the second son in his father's family: his paternal 
parent, Joseph Hemphill, died in Vaughan, in 1878, at the ripe old age of 
eighty-four years. Mr. \Villiam Hemphill, since the family first located 
there, has always lived on the homestead, which was at first all bush. He 
was married in the year 1865 to Jane Hamilton, sister of l'v1r. Gavin 
Hamilton, of this township, by whom he has eight children. He belongs 
to the Presbyterian Church, and is a Conservative in politics. 


GIDEON HISLOP, lot 50, concession I, is the grandson of a Scotch farmer, 
who emigrated from Perthshire, Scotland, at an early day, and located on 
the lot now owned by the subject of this notice. l\1r. Hislop was born on 
the family homestead, and is the fourth son in his father's (the late Gideon 
Hislop) family. The latter in his day contributed a great deal to the town- 
ship improvements, and in other ways, such as introducing some very fine 
Clyde draught horses, for a better class of stock. Mr. Hislop is not married, 
but his mother and sister reside on the farm with him. He is a Reformer 
in politics, and the family are members of the Presbyterian Church. 
JOHN HUGILL, lot 32, concession 7, was born in the City of Toronto, in 
the year 1833' His grandfather, John Hugill, was an early settler in York, 
and formerly conducted a brewery in Toronto. His father, also named 
John, died when our subject was but four years old. John Hugill has 
travelled around a good deal in his lifetime, but he has lived about thirty- 
five years in Vaughan off and on. He is interested in the breeding of 
horses, and has now a fine imported Clyde colt with an excellent pedigree. 
Mr. Hugill married in 1855 Susan Cloney, daughter of John Cloney, of 
Etobicoke Township, by whom he has a family of ten children. He attends 
the English church, and votes for Conservative measures. 


ROBERT IRWIN, lot 28, concession 6, was born in the County Tyrone, 
Ireland, in 1811, and emigrated to Canada in 1832. He first settled in 
concession 7 of Vaughan, after coming direct to York County, where he 
remained about five years. He then sold that farm and located at Hogg's 
Hollow for two years, after which he bought the farm where he now 
resides. The only office he has held since his residence here is that of 
Returning Officer, which he filled for one year. His connection with the 
Presbyterian Church has been marked by the earnest attention he has 
given to all matters relative to its welfare, he having been an elder for 
several years. Mr. Irwin was married in the year 1858 to Eleanor \Vallace. 
He is a Conservative in politics. 



34 2 


Biographical Notices. 


DAVID JEFFREY, an old settler in this township, whose long public 
connection with the municipality entitles him to receive at our hands more 
consideration than the space allotted to us usually affords, was born in the 
parish of \Vhitson, Berwickshire, Scotland, in the year 1799. He was put 
to the plough at an early age, and before he had arrived at manhood had 
acquired a practical knowledge of all matters relating to agriculture. He 
was employed on the estate of Sir John Hay to carry out a series of impor- 
tant improvements, in which situation he remained until 1833, when the 
family decided upon emigration. He had, some little time before, married 
a half.cousin, Jane Mitchell, and the family, consisting of father, mother, 
two brothers, and three sisters, besides himself and wife, took passage for 
Quebec, and, having friends in York County, they proposed proceeding 
thither to settle. The voyage across the Atlantic occupied fourteen weeks, 
and the journey from Quebec to Little York was made by Durham boats. 
It was an August Sabbath afternoon when" Muddy Little York" (then 
on the point of being re-christened) was reached, where they stayed a few 
days before resuming the journey to Richmond Hill. After arriving at 
their destination, the first business was to gain possession of some land, 
which they eventually did, being lot 34, concession 8 of the Township of 
Vaughan, for which they paid [400 sterling-[200 down. As was usual 
in such cases, they had to put up with considerable inconvenience and 
hardship during the first few years of settlement, the township then bemg 
far from completely settled. 1\1:r. Jeffrey early became associated with the 
local governing body, and was elected one of the commissioners appointed 
to conduct the expenditure allowed by Government for public improve- 
ments in the municipality. He also assumed the office of Township Clerk, 
which he managed with ability for seven years. l\1r. Jeffrey is a politician 
of strong Reform proclivities; and, having personally suffered under the 
system originated by "The Family Compact," has ever since endeavoured 
to promote the return of Reform candidates. Having lived through the 
dangerous period of the Rebellion, he was well acquainted with its causes 
and effects, and has never wavered in his allegiance to the party who fought 
for and obtained Responsible Government for the people of Canada. Mr. 
Jeffrey is still hale and hearty, and his declining years are made happy by 
his children and grandchildren, to whom he often recounts the story of the 
stirring times gone by. 


JOHN JEFFREY, lot IS, concession 9, was born on the lot which he now 
occupies in 1849. His father, the late Richard Jeffrey, emigrated at an 
early day from the County of Kent, England, and, on his arrival in York, 



Township of Vaughan. 


343 


settled in concession 8. He afterwards worked on the farm now occupied 
by his son John, where he resided until his death in 1872, at the age of 
fifty-four years. His wife is still living on the homestead. John Jeffrey 
is the only son living of their family. Being of a retiring disposition
 
he has taken no part in municipal affairs, but attends strictly to his own 
immediate concerns. He attends the Presbyterian Church, and is a Reformer 
in poJitics. He has five sisters, two of whom are married, one to Mr. Gavin 
Hamilton, and the other to l'vir. Thomas Richardson. Mr. Jeffrey, in addi- 
tion to the management of his own farm, practises as Veterinary Surgeon, 
having received his diploma from the Ontario Veterinary College in 1874. 


JOHN JOHNSON, lot 2, concession 8, was born in the year 1840, on the 
lot where he still lives. He is the eldest son of the late Robert Johnson, 
who emigrated from Dun:fries, Scotland, in the year 1832, and, after remain- 
ing two years in the Ottawa district, located in Vaughan Township, York 
County, where he brought up his family. 


DAVID JOHNSTON, lots 3 and 4, concession 8, was born in Dumfries- 
shire, Scotland, in the year 1811, and emigrated to Canada in 1831. He 
settled first in the vicinity of Ottawa, and at the end of two years moved 
west, and settled in Vaughan Township, on his present farm. At the time 
he first located here the country around was very wild, although the land 
was mostly taken up. In 1849 Mr. Johnston married Catharine Dalziel, 
daughter of John Dalziel, of this township. They had a family of five 
children, two of whom are now dead. He is a Presbyterian in religion, and 
a Liberal in politics. 


PETER KEFFER, lot 12, concession 3, was born in Somerset County, 
Pennsylvania, December 30, 1879. His father, Jacob Keffer, was a native 
of Germany. The family came to Canada in 1806, and settled on the lot 
now occupied by the subject of this sketch, where the father lived until his 
death. Mr. Keffer was married in 1823 to Miss Fisher, by whom he had 
nine children. They are adherents of the Lutheran Church, and Mr. Keffer, 
like his father, is a Reformer in politics. He has one son living on the 
homestead with him, who is married and has one child. 


WILLIAM KEFFER, lot 9, concession 3, was born on the farm where he 
now resides, in the year 1812. He is the youngest son living of the late 
l\iichael Keffer, who settled in Vaughan as early as 1806, where he lived 
until his death in 1852. His family consisted of six sons and three daughters, 
some members of the family dying very young. Although brought up to 



344 


Biograþ/tical Notices. 


the Lutheran faith, he afterwards joined the Church of England, and 
entered with spirit into all matters undertaken for its future benefit. He 
gave the land for the first church built, which is still standing, and where 
services are yet conducted: it is a log building. \Yilliam Keffer married 
in 1831 Susanna Burkholder, a daughter of Oldrick Burkholder, of this 
township: they have six daughters and two sons living. l\1r. Keffer has 
taken an interest in municipal affairs. He is an adherent of the English 
Church, and a Conservative in politics. 


ROBERT KERR, lot 23, concession 7, was born in 1812 in the Island of 
Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands group. His father was a soldier in 
the British army, and served during the Peninsular \Var. Robert emigrated 
to Canada in the year 1844, accompanied by his wife and two children. 
He remained a few months in Toronto, and then moved into York Town- 
ship. In the year 1846 he accepted a situation as school teacher in conces- 
sions 2 and 3, York, where he taught for one year, afterwards removing to 
Vaughan Township, and was there occupied in teaching for a number of 
years. In the year 1860 he settled on the farm where he now lives. He is 
an adherent of the Presbyterian Church, and a Reformer in politics. 


THOMAS KERSEY, lot 22, concession 10, is the eldest son of the late 
\Yilliam Kersey, and was born in 1836, on the farm where he now resides. 
His father came from \Vestmoreland, England, and on his arrival in York 
remained two years in Toronto Gore, and subsequently settled on the farm 
in Vaughan. He was a man highly r
spected throughout the township, 
and held several important offices in connection with the municipal govern- 
ment. He was a member of the Township Council, and received the 
appointment of first License Inspector of the section. His death occurred 
in 1876, he being seventy-five years old. Thomas Kersey has continued to 
reside at the old homestead. He has two brothers, one of whom lives with 
him on the farm. His mother is also living and in good health, being now 
seventy-five years of age. He attends the Episcopal Church, and is a 
Conservative in politics. 


ROBERT KING, lot 13, concession 9, is of Scotch parentage, and was 
born on the farm where he now resides. His father, the late Robert King, 
an early settler in this part of the township, emigrated from Ayrshire, 
Scotland, and, previous to his location in this section, remained some time 
in Kingston and Toronto, where he worked at his trade of stone-cutter. 
About 1830 he came to Vaughan, and commenced farming, and continued 
to follow that industry until his death in 1872. Robert's birth took place 



Township of Vaughan. 


345 


in 1836, he being the youngest son of the family, and he has always followed 
farming. He was married in 1859 to a daughter of Mr. James Devins, by 
whom he has a family of seven children. He is an adherent Ç)f the Presby- 
terian Church, and in politics IS a Reformer. 


NATHANIEL KIRBY, lot 38, concession I, was born in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, in the year 1806, and emigrated to Canada in 1831. He came direct 
to York County and located in Vaughan Township, where he had a brother 
already settled. For some years he worked among the farmers of the 
district, and in 1836 rented a farm in l'v1arkham Township. At the expira- 
tion of five years he went to live at \Veston, and conducted a hotel in 
connection with a farm for about eighteen months. He then moved to 
concession 2 of Vaughan, to a farm formerly occupied by Mr. \Villiam 
Cook, where he stayed twenty-five years. In 1860 he moved on to the farm 
where he now resides. He married in 1836 Harriett Mason, also from 
Yorkshire, by whom he had five children. He is a Conservative in politics, 
and a member of the Church of England. When he first settled in Vaughan 
there were a church and a log school-house in Thornhill. 


JAMES KURTZ, lot 28, concession 9, is the youngest son of the late John 
Kurtz, and was born on concession 2 of Vaughan, in the year 1842. He 
has resided on his present farm since the death of his father in 1879. He 
belongs to the Methodist Church, and is a Reformer in politics. 


JOHN C. KURTZ, lot 27, concession 10, was born near Richmond Hill, 
in the year 1830. His fàther, the late John Kurtz, came from Pennsylvania 
when quite a child, and settled with his parents in Vaughan. In the year 
1849 he moved to concession 9, where he lived until his death in 1880, at 
the age of seventy-two years. John C. married in 1871, his wife being 
Sarah Calham, daughter of Mr. James Calham, of Toronto Township, by 
whom he has a family of six children. Mr. Kurtz has taken great interest 
in municipal matters, and his opinion is often sought in connection with 
township affairs. He is also an enthusiastic politician, and works hard for 
the Reform Party. The temperance cause has in him an ardent supporter, 
and he looks hopefully forward to the time when the Scott Act shall be 
carried in his native county. 


.. 


JACOB LAHMER, lots 16 and 17, concession 5, was born in the year 
1828. He is the only son of the late Jacob Lahmer, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, who emigrated to Canada in the year 1823, and shortly afterwards 
settled in Vaughan. His mother's maiden name was Susan Mussulman, 



34 6 


Biograpllical Notices. 


who carried on the management of the farm after her husband's death, her 
own taking place in 1879. The old homestead was Jacob's birthplace, 
where he has always lived. He has taken great interest in municipal and 
agricultural matters, having been a member of the Township Council for 
two years, and a Director of the Agricultural Society since its inauguration. 
He has assisted materially in the development of well-bred stock in the 
section, and has taken several prizes at the neighbouring fairs for Durham 
cattle. Mr. Lahmer was married in the year 1850 to Barbara Snider, 
daughter of the late Mr. John Snider t of Vaughan. 


JOHN LAHMER, lot 15, concession 3, was born in the Township of 
Vaughan, in the year 1854, being the eldest son of Jacob Lahmer, whose 
sketch precedes this. He was married in 1881 to a daughter of Mr. 
Thomas ),1 ulholland, a prominent pioneer of York Township. Mr. Lahmer 
gives great attention to all matters concerning agriculture. He was the 
leading institutor of the Vaughan Ploughmen's Association, which has won 
such celebrity of late years. At the inaugural match in 1879, he and three 
of his brothers won one watch, two silver cups and two ploughs as 
premiums. Although the object of this sketch was not so successful as 
some ploughmen, he has tried his skill against the best men in the county. 
l\'[r. Lahmer has also taken an active part in politics, and is prominent 
among the workers of the Reform Party of West York. He is Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Riding Association, and has been Secretary of the Township 
Association for years. 


JOSEPH LANKIN, lot 8, concession 6, was born in the Township of 
Vaughan (where the Village of Maple now stands) in the year 1830. He is 
the third son of the late Rickard Lankin, an early settler, who located on 
lot 19, concession 4, when nothing but bush was to be seen around. Mr. 
Lankin, sen'r, afterwards moved back to lot 3, concession I, where he 
lived about eight years. He subsequently went to Pickering Township, 
and after spending a number of years there took up his residence in Ham- 
ilton, where he died. Joseph, the subject of this notice, was married to 
Elizabeth Hodges in 1845. She was a daughter of Jonathan Hodges who 
emigrated from Ireland in the early times of settlement. Mr. Hodges, at 
the commencement of his career in the township, taught school, which he 
continued for four years, and then bought a farm in Tecumseth Township, 
on which he lived until his death. l\lr. Lankin by his marriage has a family 
of six sons and two daughters living. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church, and a Conservative in politics. When he first settled on his present 
lot it was a swamp, and there was no church nearer than Woodbridge. 



Township of Vaughan. 


347 


JOHN LAWRIE is a native of Lanarkshire, Scotland, having been born 
within a short distance of the City of Glasgow in the year 1802. He was 
early initiated in the weaving business, but did not follow it, afterwards 
working with his father on the farm. He married Isabella Reid in 1830, 
and emigrated to Canada in the same year. He settled first in York Town- 
ship, where he lived nearly five years. He then removed to Scarboro', 
where he lived six years, and from there he moved to his present residence, 
lot 12, concession 9, Vaughan. At the time of his settlement in Vaughan 
roads were conspicuous by their absence, and schools, churches, and 
institutions of that kind were dreams of the future; religious services were 
then conducted in barns, and oftentimes in the kitchen of Mr. Sommerville. 
Mr. Lawrie was a member of the first Council of Vaughan, and in other 
affairs took an active part. He entered with spirit into the building of 
Knox Church in the township, and has always been a consistent member of 
the Presbyterian Church. The family consists of five daughters and one 
son. He is a Conservative in politics. Gavin Lawrie, son of the above, 
was born in Scarboro' Township in 1836. He married in 1859 Eliza Jane 
Bennett, by whom he has a family of five children. In religion and politics 
he follows his father. 


JOHN LINE, lot 18, concession 4, is a born resident of Vaughan Town- 
ship, having been born on the lot where he still continues to reside. He is 
the only son of the late Henry Line, a Canadian by birth, and one of the 
oldest settlers in Vaughan, the famIly having originally emigrated from 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Line, sen'r, always lived on and industriously cultivated 
the home farm, where he died in 1870 at the age of sixty-four years; his wife 
is still living in l\Iaple Grove. Mr. John Line was married in 1858 to 
Martha Bennett, a daughter -of the late Jacob Bennett; they have seven 
children living. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and a Conservative 
in political opinion. 


SAMUEL LINE was born on lot 15, concession 4, Vaughan Township, in 
the year 1814, being the third son of the late John Line, mentioned else- 
where. He was married in 184-1 to Rebecca Murray, daughter of the late 
Christopher Murray, an old settler in this township; they had three 
children, only one of whom is now living. He is a member of the Lutheran 
Church, and belongs to the Reform Party. 


\VILLIAM LINE, lot 16, concession 4, was born in Vaughan Township, 
on lot 15, concession 4, in the year 1816, and is the youngest son of the late 
John Line. His father emigrated from Pennsylvania at an early day, and 



34 8 


Biograplu"cal J.Votices. 


on his arrival in York immediately settled in Vaughan on the same farm 
now owned by our subject, which at that period was all bush. He con- 
tinued to live on the farm until his death, which event occurred about the 
year 1840. \Villiam Line was married in 1839; his wife's maiden name 
was Susan Snider, she being a daughter of the late Jacob Snider; the issue 
of this union is five children. They are adherents of the Methodist Church, 
and Mr. Line's political sympathies are with the Reform Party. 


SAMUEL l\'[CCLURE, lot 13, concession 8, is a native of Vaughan Town- 
ship, and was born in the year 1853, being the youngest in a family of ten 
children, born to Andrew McClure, mentioned in another sketch. Mr. 
l\IcClure married in the year 1877 Nancy Cameron, the eldest daughter of 
Mr. Archibald Cameron, of Vaughan Township, by whom he has a family 
of five children. He belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and is in politics 
a Conservative. 


WILLIAM MCCLURE, lot 14, concession 8, is the son of the late Andrew 
McClure, one of the very first settlers in this section of the township. The 
latter emigrated from County Armagh, Ireland, in 1833, and assisted in the 
erection of a considerable number of grist and saw-mills on the Humber. 
He settled on the lot now occupied by the subject of this sketch, where he 
remained until his death, which occurred in 1876, at the age of sixty-seven 
years; his widow is still living, and resides with \Villiam on the home- 
stead. William was born in 1857, and in 1875 married Ellen Nesbitt, 
daughter of the late John Nesbitt, of Toronto Township, by whom he has 
three children living. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and takes 
great interest in all matters concerning that body, especially the Sabbath 
school, in which he is a teacher. He votes on the Conservative side. 


DONALD McDoNALD, lot 24, concession 6, is the grandson of one John 
McDonald, who was born in the Highlands of Scotland. His grandfather 
was a soldier and held the rank of Sergeant in the British Army, and came 
to America in that capacity. He served through the Revolutionary \Var, 
and lived in New York State six or seven years, during which period John 
Macdonald, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born. The family 
came to York County, and settled on Yonge Street, north of Toronto, 
where they remained two years, subsequently removing to Vaughan Town- 
ship on lot 19, concession 3, where our subject's grand-parents died. His 
father resided at home until he was twenty-one years of age, and then took 
possession of lot 19, concession 6, which he successfully cultivated until 



TownshiP of Vaughan. 


349 


his death. Donald was one of a family of five children, and was born in 
the year 1835. He was married in the year 1875, his wife's maiden name 
being Flora McDonald; the issue of their union is four children. Mr. 
l'vicDonald has devoted much attention to church matters, and is Treasurer 
and Trustee of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Reformer in politics. 


J AMES McDoNALD, lot 19, concession 3, was born in the year 1
36 on 
the same farm where he now resides, being the youngest son of the late 
Archibald McDonald. His father came to Canada when quite young, in 
company with his parents; they were from the United States, and were 
of Scotch extraction. James has always lived on the old homestead in 
Vaughan, and married in 1863 Barbara Watson, by whom he had three 
children. She died however, and his second union was with Elizabeth, 
daughter of the late Henry White, by whom he had three children, two of 
whom are dead. The family are adherents of the Methodist Church, and 
Mr. McDonald is a Reformer in politics. 


JOHN MCGILLIVRAY, lot 31, concession 7, was born in Vaughan Town- 
ship on the lot where he now resides, which is the same farm located on by 
his father, Neil McGillivray, when he emigrated from Argyleshire, Scot- 
land, in the early days of settlement. :Mr. McGillivray was married in the 
year 1864, his wife being Nancy McGillivray; their family consists of two 
sons and three daughters. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
and in politics is a Reformer. 


LACHLIN MCGILLIVRAY, lot 30, concession 7, is a native of the Island ot 
Mull, Scotland, where he was born in 1807, being the youngest son of the 
late John McGillivray, mentioned elsewhere. Mr. McGillivray is the 

 second owner from the Crown of the farm he now resides upon; his father 
lived on the farm with him until his death. He was married before leaving 
Scotland to Flora McKinnon, by whom he has seven children living, viz. : 
Donald, Mary, Sarah, Margaret, Hugh, Ann, Janet; John died when three 
years of age. He belongs to the Presbyterian body, and is a Reformer in 
politics. 


NEIL MCGILLIVRAY, lot 19, concession 9, is a native of Vaughan Town- 
ship. He is the eldest son of the late Neil McGillivray, an early settler, 
who emigrated from the Island of Mull, Scotland, accompanied by his 
mother and the rest of the family. They came direct to York and located 
for a few years on concession 3, and in 1836 moved to the farm, lot 20, 
concession 9, Vaughan Township, where the subject of this sketch was 



35 0 


Bt"ograþhz'cal Notices. 


born. Mr. McGillivray died M:arch 30, 1884, at the advanced age of 
eighty-two years. Neil McGillivray is an adherent of the Presbyterian 
Church, and a Reformer in politics. 


CHARLES E. McKINNON, pump manufacturer, late of Richmond Hill, 
is the son of Angus McKinnon, of Markham Township. He was born in 
Markham, and remained at home until his marriage in 1871 with Sarah M., 
daughter of John Perkins, of Victoria Square, when he removed to Rich- 
mond Hill and engaged in his present business, which includes the manu- 
facture of all kinds of first-class pumps and windmills. He also deals 
extensively in hydraulic rams and similar appliances. He has lately 
removed to Kleinburg, where a full line of all goods sold by him is kept 
in stock. 


DUNCAN McKINNON, lot 18, concession 8, was born in Argyleshire, 
Scotland, in 1833. He came to Canada with his parents and family in 
1834. The family first settled in Vaughan and afterwards removed to 
Markham, where they lived about five years. They then returned to 
Vaughan and took possession of the lot now occupied by Duncan, where 
the father died. Mr. McKinnon was twice married, both his wives being 
dead. He is a Presbyterian in religion, and in politics a Conservative. 


JOHN McKINNON, lot 18, concession 5, was born in Trafalgar Town- 
ship, Halton County, in the year 1824, being the eldest son of Donald 
McKinnon, who emigrated from the Isle of Mull, Scotland, in the year 1820. 
On arriving in Canada his father stayed some time at Little York, and 
subsequently moved into the Township of Markham and settled on lot 9, 
concession 6 (one hundred and fifty acres), which is still farmed by a 
brother of our subject. Mr. :McKinnon,sen'r, remained in Markham about 
two years and then settled in Halton County, where he married and settled 
upon fifty acres of land near Streetsville, on which he lived about twenty-one 
years, and then disposed of, finally purchasing the farm in Vaughan where 
John, his son, now resides, and where the old man lived until his death, at 
the age of sixty-eight years. John married in the year 1860 Ann Drum- 
mond, who was a native of Caledon Township, by whom he has a family 
of three children living. The family are adherents of the Presbyterian 
Church, and Mr. l\1cKinnon is a Reformer in politics. Our subject had to 
help his father in the early days to clear the farm, which was then all bush, 
and remembers perfectly well the school teacher boardiÐg around amongst 
the different families, which was then the only possible means by which the 
children could obtain any education. 



Township of Vaughan. 


35 1 


JOHN McLEAN, lot 16, concession 6, was born in 1850 on the farm he at 
present occupies, and is the youngest son of the late John McLean. His 
father was one of the first settlers in Vaughan, having emigrated from Tyre, 
Scotland, about the year 1821. After his arrival he was engaged upon the 
construction of Brock's Monument, and about the year 1839 purchased the 
above mentioned farm in Vaughan, where he lived until his death in April, 
1879. He was in religion a Presbyterian, and took great interest in Church 
matters. His political leaning was decidedly Conservative. He left his 
farm to his son John, who in religion and political ideas follows in the same 
grooves as his father. 


DUNCAN 
'l:CMILLAN, lot 27, concession 3, was born in the township, on 
the farm where he now resides. He is the youngest son of the late Hugh 
McMillan, who emigrated from Argyleshire, Scotland, and composed one 
of the band of pioneer settlers in Vaughan, being very widely known and 
much respected throughout the section. Mr. McMillan landed at little 
York whe!1 there were only three or four houses, and they travelled to their 
destination by a deer track, carrying their luggage on two sticks across 
their shoulders. He settled on the farm now occupied by Duncan, where 
he remained until his death, March 9, 1876: his birth was on August 9, 
1791. He took little or no interest in municipal affairs, but politically was 
an enthusiastic Conservative. He took great interest in Church matters, 
being a member of the Presbyterian body. Duncan McMillan was born in 
1843, and has always lived on the old homestead. 


ALEXANDER McNAUGHTON was born in the Township of Vaughan in 
1848, being the second son of the late Reverend Peter McNaughton, a 
clergyman of the old Scottish Kirk, who came to Canada in 1833, and was 
the first minister of any denomination established in Vaughan. The Rev- 
erend Peter McNaughton preached in Vaughan about five years, and then 
returned to Scotland to take charge of a parish, where he remained about 
three years. He came back to Canada at the end of that period, and again 
taking up his residence in Vaughan ministered to the wants of the section 
for about nine years. He subsequently removed to Pickering Township, 
and, after a number of years spent in Gospel work in that locality, he 
returned to Vaughan, where he had considerable property: he retired from 
the ministry and remained here until his death in March, 1874, at the 
advanced age of eighty-one years. Alexander was married in the year 
1880 to Catharine Cameron, by whom he has two sons. He belongs to the 
Presbyterian Church, and is in politics a Conservative. 



35 2 


Biographical Notices. 


PETER l\ICNAUGHTON, lot 6, concession 9, was born in the year 1846 on 
concession 5 of Vaughan, being the third son of the late Donald McN augh- 
ton. His father emigrated from Perthshire, Scotland, in 1837, and settled 
in concession 5 of this township, where he lived until his death in 1878, at 
the age of seventy-five years. He was a brother of the late Reverend Peter 
McN aughton, who for many years acted as minister for the Presbyterian 
body in Vaughan. Mr. Peter McNaughton was married in 1884, his wife's 
maiden name being Margaret Bryson, a daughter of Mr. J ames Bryson, of 
this section. He is an adherent of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics 
votes for the Conservative Party. 


ANDREW McNEIL, lot 12, concession 6, is a native of Vaughan Town- 
ship, having been born on lot 14, concession 6, in the year 1834. He is the 
second son of the late Mr. Arthur McNeil, a very old settler in Vaughan, 
who came to Canada in 1819. His father remained in Toronto, then Little 
York, about fourteen years, where he married. He afterwards purchased 
land in Vaughan on lot 14, concession 6, where he continued to live until 
his death. His wife's maiden name was Margaret Jamieson, who is still 
living. During his lifetime he took a very intelligent interest in agricultural 
matters, being the first to introduce the Galloway breed of cattle into this 
section. He was also active in political affairs, and was a zealous and 
consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. He died in the year 1881, 
at the advanced age of eighty-one years. Andrew, the second in order of 
his father's family, was married in 1872 to Sarah Livingston, by whom he 
has three children. In politics, as well as creed, he follows in his father's 
footsteps. ... 


CHARLES McNEIL, lot 14, concession 9, was born in Vaughan Town- 
ship, on the lot where he now resides. His father, the late Colonel Arthur 
McNeil, emigrated from County Cavan, Ireland, in the year 1821. He 
remained about ten years in Toronto, and in the year 1831 purchased the 
farm the locality of which is given at the commencement of this sketch. 
He always entered with a progressive spirit into agricultural undertakings, 
and introduced into the township the celebrated Galloway cattle. He died 
on the farm in the year 1881. Charles was the eldest son of his father's 
family, and continues to cultivate the old farm, which is a very fine one of 
two hundred and fifty acres. 


ARCHIBALD MCQUARRIE, lot 23, concession 4, is a native of New York 
State, where he was born in 1818. In company with his parents he came 
to Canada in 1827. His father, Lachlan McQuarrie, after his arrival in 



TOWllship of Vaughan. 


353 


York County, settled on lots 15 and 16, concession 3, in 1829, and died in 
the fall of the same year. After his father's death, his mother purchased 
twenty-five acres of lot 23, concession 4, and two years afterwards she also 
died. The family consisted of seven children besides the subject of this 
sketch, who are all indebted to their eldest sister for the devoted manner in 
which she endeavoured to supply the loss they had sustained. She is now 
married and is a resident of Vaughan, being the wife of Mr. Francis Bunt. 
Each member of the family is now doing well, and most of them are living 
in this neighbourhood. Archibald McQuarrie was married in 1864 to Emma 
Pickering, a native of England: they have a family of ten children. He 
has taken an active part in municipal matters, having been a member of the 
Township Council about four years. He belongs to the Presbyterian 
Church, and is a Reformer in politics. 


JOHN C. MCQUARRIE, lot 20, concession 4, was born in the State of 
New York in the year 1825. His father, the late Lachlan McQuarrie, 
emigrated from there to Canada about the year 1830, and coming to York 
County located on lot 17, concession 3, Vaughan Township. He died, 
however, after he had been about twelve months at the new settlement, 
leaving a family of eight children, three girls and five boys, of whom John 
C., the subject of this sketch, is the third in order. His mother died a few 
years after; thus, at the age of fourteen years, he was left to fight the battle 
of life alone. Nothing daunted, he commenced to work with a carpenter, 
from whom he received five dollars per month in the summer and no money 
at all in winter. He worked for him about three years, during which period 
he received a little schooling in the winter months. He then hired out at 
eighteen dollars per month,. and the subsequent year commenced business 
for himself. He carried on a general carpenter and builder's trade for about 
ten years, in which he was more than ordinarily successful; but failing 
health compelled him to give up that business, and he purchased one 
hundred and fifty acres of land, which he has since continued to farm. Mr. 

lcQuarrie was married in the year 1853; his wife was Sarah Ann Bennett, 
daughter of Jacob Bennett, who was a native of Vaughan, having been 
born before the \Var of 1812. They have a family of three daughters living. 
His wife died about fourteen years ago, and he has since that time remained 
a widower. Mr. McQuarrie is a Justice of the Peace, and has also taken 
considerable interest in church matters, having filled several important posi- 
tions during the last twenty years. 


ALEXANDER MALLOY, lot 33, concession 7, is a native of Vaughan Town- 
ship, and was born in concession 4. He is the eldest son of Mr. Archibald 
24 



354 


Biographical Notices. 


Malloy, who is still living on the homestead, the latter having emigrated 
from Argyleshire, Scotland, in the year 1826. On arriving in York he 
removed into the neighbouring County of Peel, and located for a short 
time in Caledon Township, afterwards (in 1827) coming to Vaughan, where 
he settled. Alexander was born in the year 1838, and in 1860 married a 
daughter of Mr. James Bryson, of this section. Our subject has given 
a considerable amount of time and attention to municipal affairs, and was 
for about ten years a member of the Council of Colborne Township, Huron 
County, having formerly resided there. He has been connected with the 
Council of his native township four years, and is at present Deputy-Reeve. 
He belongs to the Presbyterian body, and is a Liberal in politics. 


JOHN MALLOY, lot 35, concession 4, is a native of Argyleshire, Scotland, 
having been born in the year 1802. He emigrated to Canada in 1824 with 
his parents. His father was the late Neil Malloy, who was well-known in 
his day throughout this district. In the year 1829 John lVlalloy purchased 
land in Vaughan Township, the same lot on which he now resides. l'vIr. 
Malloy remembers the first church being built on concession 6, at which 
time there were no roads. He was married in 1837 to Isabella Mitchell; 
they have a family of four sons and one daughter living. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and casts his vote for the Conservative Party. 


GILBERT MATHEWSON, lot 20, rear of concession 4, was born in the 
Township of Vaughan on the same lot where he now lives. His father, 
the late Joseph Mathewson, emigrated from Ireland with his parents and 
settled in Vaughan at an early day, the locality at that time being very 
wild; he located in 1836 on the farm now occupied by his son Gilbert. 
He died in 1873; his wife is still living, being seventy-five years of age. 
Gilbert married in 1860 Susannah Line, a daughter of Samuel Line, who 
lives in Maple Village. At her death he married his present wife, whose 
maiden name was Sarah Shunk; she is a daughter of Mr. Simon Shunk, of 
this township. He has five children by his first wife and one by his present 
wife. The family are adherents of the Methodist Church, and he is a 
Reformer in politics. 


JOHN :i\1AXWELL, lot 6, concession 2, was born in Yorkshire, England, 
in the year 1816. His father was the late Thomas Maxwell, who emigrated 
to Canada in the year 1818 in company with his parents and other mem- 
bers of his family. Thomas Maxwell was married in England to Martha 
Robson, by whom he had six children; he was a miller by trade and 



Township of Vaugkan. 


355 


followed that occupation after his arrival here; subsequently, entering into 
partnership with Mr. Thomas Fair, they operated a mill on their own 
account. Some time afterwards he removed to West York and conducted 
a saw-mill for about three years. He then came to Vaughan and rented 
part of the farm belonging to his father for a term of six years; but unfor- 
tunately died before the expiration of his lease. John remained at home 
with his parents for some years. On leaving there he went to Weston, 
where he resided between two and three years, afterwards returning to 
Vaughan. About the year 1838 he moved on to the farm he at present 
occupIes. 


ROBERT :METCALF, retired, was born in Yorkshire, England, in the 
year 1809. In 1831, accompanied by his brother Thomas, he emigrated to 
Canada and came to little York, now Toronto. He shortly afterwards 
removed into Markham and worked for various farmers in the section. He 
subsequently purchased land in Vaughan, on lot 23, concession 2, where he 
resided thirty-six years and brought up his family. He was married in the 
year 1841 to Mary Ann Hoshel, a Canadian by birth of German extraction. 
His family consists of two boys and one girl. Mr. Metcalf is a member of 
the Methodist Church, and was a deed trustee of the old Methodist Church 
at Richmond Hill; he was an assistant class-leader to Amos Wright, and 
conducted the class-meetings in the absence of Mr. \Vright while attending 
to his parliamentary duties. Mr. 'Metcalf mounted guard at Thornhill 
during the Mackenzie Rebellion. He is a Reformer in politics. His son 
Thomas was sergeant of a troop of cavalry for about ten years, and was 
looked upon as being a very efficient officer. 


EDWARD MILLER, lot 27, concession 6, is a native of County Tyrone, 
Ireland, where he was born in the year 1800. He was a weaver by trade, 
which occupation he followed previous to his emigration to Canada in 1827. 
He came direct to York County and located in Vaughan Township, and 
about six years after his arrival purchased the farm on which he now 
resides. Mr. -Miller married in Ireland, Rebecca Noble, by whom he had 
a family of ten children, six sons and four daughters; four being dead. He 
belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and is a Conservative in politics. 
From his long residence in the township, Mr. Miller can bear testimony to 
the vast improvements made in the section since first he entered it, and the 
fact that he can remember the time when neither roads, churches or schools 
existed, speaks eloquently on behalf of the settlers whose enterprise and 
energy have contributed to the present satisfactory state of things. 



35 6 


Biographical Notices. 


JOHN -MOODY, lot 21, concession 9, was born in Vaughan Township, 
being the youngest son ofthe late Mr. James Moody, a native of Yorkshire, 
England. Mr. l\100dy, sen'r, on his arrival in Canada came direct to York, 
and purchased fifty acres of land in Etobicoke Township, on which he 
remained about fifteen years. He soon after purchased the farm in 
Vaughan, where his son John now resides; where he lived until the time 
of his death in 1883, at the age of eighty years. His wif
, our subject's 
mother, still lives in Gray County. John Moody was married in the year 
1880 to Matilda, daughter of the late Mr. John Prescott, of Toronto, by 
whom he has three children. He belongs to the l\iethodist Church, and is 
a Conservative in politics. 


ARCHIBALD MORROW, lot 26, concession 7, was born on the farm he now 
occupies, being the son of the late James Morrow. His father emigrated 
from County Cavan, Ireland, in the year 1819, and on his arrival settled 
first at Chippewa, where he was married. He appears to have followed 
different occupations in various places before locating in Vaughan. At one 
time he chopped cordwooå on Cruikshank's Lane (now Bathurst Street), 
Toronto, for the sum of twenty-five cents per cord, and he was subsequently 
engaged as one of the party who surveyed the section where the town of 
Barrie now stands. In the year 1830 he settled in this township on the 
farm where his son, Archibald, now resides. He was a man who, in all 
probability, would have made a useful member of the municipal body elect, 
from his great experience and well-known capacity for observation, but 
such office he never sought, although it is recorded that he always worked 
hard for his friends and party. He died in the year 1869, at the advanced 
age of eighty-one years, having lived a useful and industrious life, and gained 
a host of friends. Archibald Morrow was first married in 1862, the maiden 
name of his wife being Martha McCutcheon, by whom he had a family of 
three children. He married his present wife in the year 1871, her name 
being Margaret Slater; they have three children. Mr. Morrow belongs to 
the :\Iethodist Church, and is a Conservative in politics. 


lVIALCOLM MULLOY, lot 35, concession 5, was born in Argyleshire, 
Scotland, in the year 1810, and is the youngest son now living of the late 
Neill\1ulloy. The latter emigrated to Canada in the year 1825 with his 
family, and came to little York, and after staying there a short time, he 
removed to Vaughan and settled on lot 55, concession 4. He lived with 
his two sons, James and Neil, who had emigrated about two years previ- 
ously, and who farmed the land, he himself being a weaver, at which trade 



Township of Vaugha11. 


357 


he worked up to the period of his death, which took place in 1845. Mal- 
colm married in 1837 Agnes Cameron, who is still living; they have had a 
family of ten children, but three died when young. Mr. Mulloy is an elder 
of the Presbyterian Church, and has taken an active part in its affairs. He 
is a Conservative in politics. 


ISAAC MURRAY, lot 26, concession 5, was born in Pennsylvania, in the 
year 1816, and came with his parents to Canada when he was only two 
years of age. The account of their journey has more the appearance of an 
extract from some work of fiction than an incidental circumstance of real 
life. The distance of four hundred and fifty miles was covered by the 
parents on foot, while the children, of whom Isaac was one, rode in wallets 
over the back of a horse. It is not recorded in what length of time the 
journey was made, but no doubt it would afford a striking and instructive 
contrast as against the time occupied in traversing the distance in the 
present day. His father first settled in York Township, on lot 19, conces- 
sion 5, where he remained about ten years. In 1833 he removed to Vaughan 
Township, and purchased the lot where the subject of this sketch now 
resides. His father died at the advanced age of eighty years; his mother 
was within a few days of reaching her eighty-ninth year when her death 
occurred. The old people during their lifetime, through industry and 
perseverance, accumulafed a nice property, the mother having been in the 
habit of weaving for the neighbours, by which she earned a good deal of 
money. His father had to carryall his flour on his back from Farr's Mill 
near Weston. Isaac was the youngest son of his father's family, and to 
him fell the possession of the old homestead. He is greatly interested in 
bees, having a very large apiary in connection with the farm, from which 
he takes a great quantity of honey; he has one hundred and twenty-four 
hives, and took out last season over two thousand four hundred pounds in 
weight. Mr. Murray married Mary Cober, a daughter of the late Peter 
Cober; they had only one son who has since died. The only office held 
by our subject has been that of Road Commissioner, which he held for 
about five years. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and has taken 
an active part in church matters. He is a Conservative in politics. 


J AMES O'CONNOR, lot 24, concession 6, was born in King Township in 
the year 1846, and is the youngest son of the late Patrick O'Connor, an 
early settler in that section. His father emigrated from the County of Kerry, 
Ireland, in 1837. He came to York County, and after working for a time 
on Y onge Street he located in King Township, and worked for Mr. Bald- 



358 


Biograþhical Notices. 


win, a farmer, for about nine years.. He then purchased a farm on con- 
cession 6 of King, where he lived a number of years, and in 1855 bought 
the farm in this township, now in the hands of his son James, where he 
lived until his death, January, 1883, at the age of seventy-four years. James 
was married in 1874 to Henrietta Nuggett, daughter of Thomas Nuggett, 
who still resides in Vaughan. He belongs to the Roman Catholic faith, 
and is a Reformer in politics. 


JOHN PAGE, lot 9, concession 2, was born in the Township of Vaughan 
in the year 1828. His father, the late Lewis Page, was born in the United 
States and came to Canada in 1822. He worked around in the Township 
of Vaughan until 1825, in which year he married and settled down on the 
farm now occupied by the subject of this notice, which he had purchased, 
and where he remained about five years. He then rented the Vaughan 
farm and bought another one in King Township, where he resided twenty 
years. At the end of that period he removed again to Vaughan and located 
on his original purchase, where he continued to reside until his death, 
which event transpired in 1858, at the age of fifty-eight. The mother of 
our subject was before her marriage Rebecca Rupert; she died in 1881, 
being seventy-two years old. Both his parents were of English extraction. 
John was born on the old homestead in Vaughan. In 1851 he married 
Jane, daughter of the late J ob Wells, of King Township, by whom he had 
a family of five children. He belongs to the Methodist Church, and is a 
Reformer in politics. 


WILLIAM PATTERSON, lot 26, concession 9, was born in Roxburghshire, 
Scotland, in the year 1815. He came to Canada with his parents in 1831. 
He is the eldest son of the late Archibald Patterson, by his second wife, and 
on settling in Vaughan, our subject had to take the entire management of the 
farm in consequence of his father's advanced age and corresponding infirmi- 
ties. The latter died in the year 1837 at the venerable age of ninety-five 
years. Since Mr. William Patterson's residence in the township he has 
taken an active part in municipal affairs, having, for the last twenty years, 
filled the office of Road Commissioner, and he has been Tax Collector for 
about half that period. In addition to these he has been a School Trustee 
for a number of years. He is a Presbyterian in religion, and a Reformer in 
politics. 1\1r. Patterson married Mary Jane, daughter of the late Thomas 
Sharpe, by whom he has a family of nine children. 


HENRY PAUL, lot 24, concession 10, was born in England in the year 
180 9. He emigrated to America alone in 1834, and landed at N ew York. 



Township of Vaugha1l. 


359 


He remained some months in Utica, New York State, and then removed to 
Cleveland, Ohio, where he lived nine years. He subsequently came to 
Canada and located in Yaughan Township on the lot where he now lives. 
He was married in the year 1856 to Patience Peacock, a daughter of the 
late Thomas Peacock, of Toronto Gore. They have a family of four sons 
and three daughters, viz.: Mary, born November 8, 1857; Jane, born 
September 13,1859; Henry, born January 7,1862; Thomas, born January 
24, 186 4; Georgina, born l\Iarch 18, 1866; John, born June 9, 1868; 
Robert, born October I I, 1870. He belongs to the English Church, and is 
a Reformer in politics. 


THOMAS PETERMAN, lot 30, concession 7, was born on the lot upon 
which he is at present living and is the second son of Mr. Henry Peterman, 
who lives in Aurora; his father was born on concession 3 of this township, 
the family having originally emigrated from Pennsylvania. Mr. Henry 
Peterman of Aurora, brother to Thomas, is very active in church matters, 
and was a class leader of the Methodist Church. His retiring disposition 
has retarded him from interfering in municipal affairs. He is a Reformer 
in politics. \Vesley and Reuben, two younger brothers of the family, work 
lot 29, concession 6. 


CAPTAIN JAMES PLAYTER, deceased, was born and had always lived in 
the County of York, and during the most of his life resided at Richmond 
Hill, where he carried on for many years a large agricultural and lumbering 
business at the old homestead of his uncle, the late Squire Miles, who con- 
tributed so largely to the church and school of that village. He was many 
years Captain of the 4th Battalion York, Upper Canada Militia, retiring 
with rank in 1861. In earlier life he manifested much interest in Sunday 
school work. He took little part in public matters, though being a great 
reader, he was very familiar with the political history of the country in 
every detail. He was a Liberal Conservative in politics, but supported 
men rather than party. Captain Playter was a descendant of a very old 
Anglo-Saxon family. He was a son of James Playter, a U. E. Loyalist, 
who over eighty years ago held municipal offices in the country, and grand- 
son of the Captain George Playter referred to in " Toronto of Old," as an 
intimate friend of Governor Simcoe. He was related to many of the oldest 
families in the Province, \
as twice married, and the father of Doctor 
Playter, of Toronto, and seven other sons, one still living at Richmond 
Hill, another in the Bank of Commerce, and two daughters. His death 
occurred December 20, 1882, in the seventy-ninth year of his age. 



3 60 


Biographical Notices. 


JOHN PORTER, lot 3, concession 9, was born in the year 1810, and is a 
native of Yorkshire, England. In 1831 he came to Canada in company 
with his wife to whom he had only just been united, and settled in York 
County. After remaining in little York about six months he moved into 
Vaughan Township, where his brother, the late \Villiam Porter, had previ- 
ously settled. l\Ir. Porter located on the farm he now occupies, which was 
then in its primitive state, and the absence of roads and other adjuncts 
to comfort and convenience contributed not a little to his labour in early 
years. He takes a very active part in agricultural matters, being amongst 
the first to introduce heavy draught horses and the breed of Leicestershire 
and Cotswold sheep in this section. His wife's maiden name was Ann 
Mercer, also a native of Yorkshire; they had a family of fourteen children, 
seven of whom only are living. l\1r. Porter is a member of the Township 
Agricultural Society; a Reformer in politics, and a member of the Methodist 
Church, of which he is a Trustee. 


\VILLIAM POWILL, lot 47, concession I, is a native of Beverly, York- 
shire, Englapd, and was born in the y'ear 1814. He emigrated to Canada 
in 1830, and settled near the Village of Richmond Hill, York County, and 
commenced to work for Miles Langstaff, with whom he stayed between 
three and four years. He then rented a farm from Colonel Moodie for four 
years, afterwards moving into \Vhitchurch Township, where he rented 
another farm. At the expiration of two years, not liking the section, he 
moved to Vaughan on the farm which he still occupies. Mr. Powill in 
18 35 married :J\largaret, daughter of Colonel Bridgeford; by this union he 
had five sons and one daughter, all of whom are living at the present time. 
His wife died, and he married again in the year 1858. His second espousal 
was to Elizabeth Chamberlain, by whom he has had seven sons and two 
daughters. Mr. Powill has taken an active part in the management of the 
affairs of the municipality, and was a member of the first Council elected 
for the Village of Richmond Hill. He continued in the Council about 
seven years. He and his family are adherents of the Church of England, 
and in matters political he remains an uncompromising Conservative. Of 
his family twelve sons and three daughters are now living; the sons are all 
impregnated with the intensely loyal spirit of the father, and are prepared, 
should necessity ever require it, to defend the Crown against any enemy. 
Mr. Powill, during the Mackenzie Rebellion, was a member of Captain 
Gapper's troop of horse. Mr. Powill was the son of the late Benjamin 
Powell, who died in the Township of vVhitchurch. 



Tow1tship of Vaughall. 


3 61 


JOSEPH READMER, lot 31, concession 6, was born in 1837 in the Town- 
ship of Vaughan, on lot 12, concession 9, being the second son of Mr. 
Thomas Readmer, who now resides on concession 8. The latter is a very 
old settler, and came to Vaughan when he was thirteen years old. The 
family were originally from Scarborough, Yorkshire, England, and on their 
first landing here settled at Lachine, Quebec Province, where they remained 
about five years, subsequently coming west and settling in Vaughan Town- 
ship. The family consisted of two sons and six daughters. Joseph Readmer 
married in 1859 Sarah Ann Margaret Peter bough, whose parents came out 
with the Selkirk party, for the colonization of the Red River region: they 
have one son. The family are Presbyterians, and Mr. Readmer is in 
politics a Reformer. 


DANIEL REAMAN, lot 15, concession 2, is a native of this township, 
having been born on lot 10, concession 2. His father, the late Josiah 
Reaman, was a man well known in the Township of Vaughan and surround- 
ings, and was also born on lot 10, concession 2. The family were originally 
from Pennsylvania. The subject of this sketch is the third son living of 
his father's family.' He has two brothers living in this section, one, Josiah, 
residing with him, and the other, Nicholas, living on the old homestead; he 
has one brother, William, living in Orillia. His brother Josiah takes a very 
great interest in bee culture, and is always proud to show strangers the 
working and household arrangements of his numerous family. Daniel Rea
 
man has been thrice married, his present wife's name being Margaret 
\Voods previous to their union: he has one child. The family are members 
of the Methodist Church, and Daniel is a Reformer in politics. 


MICHAEL REAMAN, lot 7, concession 9, was born in the year 1849, and 
is the third son of the late Michael Reaman, whose parents originally came 
from Pennsylvania and settled in York at an early day. Mr. Reaman, 
sen'r, was born in York County, and took up his residence in Vaughan 
Township when the settlement of that section first began. He was a man 
well and widely known, and the enthusiastic interest he took in all Parlia
 
mentary matters gave to him more than a local celebrity. He was a strong 
Reformer, and up to the time of his death in 1871 never flinched-whatever 
may have been the position of his party-from the principles he early 
imbibed. Mr. Reaman, the subject of this notice, was married in 1876, his 
wife's maiden name being Jane lVlcCauley, a daughter of Malcolm :McCauley, 
of this township: they have a family of four children. He is a member of 
the Methodist Church. His interest in political matters is centred more in 



3 62 


Biographical Notices. 


obtaining good measures than in promoting the advancement of party. He 
does a great deal of stock-raising, and has some thoroughbred Durham 
cattle. He owns the first prize draught stallion" Edinburgh Tom," which 
was imported in 1884, and is valued at $2,500. 


THOMAS RICHARDSON, lot 14, concession 9, is the only son living of the 
late Thomas Richardson, who emigrated from Yorkshire, England, in the 
year 1818, and took up his residence first in Philadelphia, United States. 
Mr. Richardson, sen'r, after a short stay in the United States came to 
Canada and settled at little York, where he worked for Dr. Baldwin some 
time, and subsequently kept a hotel for a number of years. He then purchased 
a farm in Vaughan Township, in concession 8, which he lived on and culti- 
vated until his death in 1875, at the age of eighty-five years. Thomas, the 
subject of this notice, was born in little York in 1825. In 1859 he married 
'Miss 'McCormack, by whom he had one son. She died, and he afterwards 
married again, his second wife being Elizabeth, a daughter of the late 
Richard Jeffrey, of this township: they have four children. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church, and a Conservative in politics. 


THOMAS RIDDELL, lot 10, concession 10, was born oh lot 12, concession 
9, Vaughan Township, in the year 1842. He is the fourth son of the late 
Alfred Riddell, an early settler in Vaughan, who emigrated with his father's 
family from Roxburghshire, Scotland, and located here in 1834. 1\1r. Riddell,. 
sen'r, took an active interest in all matters concerning the Presbyterian 
Church, of which he was a ruling elder for upwards of twenty years. He 
lived on the farm until the time of his death, which occurred in January, 
1863, being then sixty-seven years of age: his wife is dead also. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was married in 1872, his wife being Jane, a daughter of 
1\Ir. John Mason, of Toronto Gore: they have a family of four children. 
He is a Reformer in politics, and, like his father, a firm adherent of the 
Presbyterian Church. 


ROBERT ROBINSON, lot I, concession 6, was born in County Armagh, 
Ireland, in the year 1837. He accompanied his parents on their emigration 
to Canada in 1838, and is the eldest son of his father's family. His father's 
name was Mark Robinson, who is still living in the Township of Chingua- 
cousy, where he settled soon after his arrival in Canada. He is now 
seventy-four years of age, and during his lifetime has taken great interest in 
municipal affairs. He is also a prominent member of the Church of Eng- 
land, and has been churchwarden on several occasions. Robert Robinson 
in 1869 married Mary Jane Graham, daughter of the late \Villiam Graham,. 



Township of Vaughan. 


3 6 3 


of this township. The latter was a proprietor of a large lumber mill, and 
was also a prominent member of the Masonic order. Our subject was the 
first pupil who passed through the Ontario Veterinary College, taking his 
diploma on March 27, 1866. He is a Conservative in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the English Church. He has a family of five children. 


PETER RUPERT, lot 16, concession 3, is descended from a family who 
originally came from Pennsylvania, U. S. He is the son of the late Adam 
Rupert, who died comparatively young, at the age of thirty-four, and was 
born on the farm where he now resides in the year 1809. Reminiscences 
of the early days of settlement may often be brought back to many through 
the medium of a biographical sketch, and the early battles with nature in 
which the pioneers played their part, to the mind's eye, may be fought 
over again by a perusal of these pages. vVith these events, although but a 
boy at the time, our subject was well acquainted, and retains a vivid recol- 
lection of the trials and hardships undergone. The absence of all signs of 
civilization, nothing around but the vast and apparently endless bush, may 
well make an impression on the mind of anyone, and Peter Rupert was 
not exempt in this respect. Having witnessed the rise and progress of his 
native township, he is naturally proud of the part he has played in its 
development. He remembers well the time when but one little German 
school was all the educational facilities afforded in the township, most of 
the settlers being Germans from Pennsylvania. There was plenty of wIld 
animals however, and the nights were made hideous by discordant noises. 
Mr. Rupert has happily seen a new state of things, and how, by the indus- 
try and energetic will of man, the wilderness may be brought into entire 
subjection. He was married in the year 1831 to Susan, daughter of the 
late John Pulebaugh, by whom he had seventeen children, some of whom 
are still living in the neighbourhood. Mr. Rupert took an active part in 
municipal affairs, but never accepted office. He is an adherent of the 
Methodist Church. 


THOMAS SEAGER, lot 31, concession I, was born in Vaughan Township, 
on concession 2, in the year 1844. He is the eldest son of the late Edward 
Seager, an early settler in Vaughan, who emigrated to Canada in company 
with his brother in the year 1830. He settled near Thornhill and operated 
a sam-mill on Y onge Street, north of the village, for about fifteen years. In 
1850 he purchased the farm in lot 31, concession I, Vaughan, where his 
son still resides, together with his mother and a younger brother. They 
are Roman Catholics in religion, while in politics Mr. Seagar supports the 
Conservative Party. He has four brothers and two sisters, all living. 



3 6 4 


Biog-raph1:cal Notices. 


SIMON SHUNK, lot 8, concession 4, is the eldest son of the late Jacob 
Shunk. His father was a native of Somerset County, Pennsylvania, who 
emigrated to Canada shortly before the \Var of 1812, and immediately after 
his arrival in York purchased the farm on which Simon now lives, and 
which he remained upon until his death in 1880, at the venerable age of 
ninety-seven. He was a Mennonite in religion, and an elder of the Church. 
Our subject was born in the old homestead in 1814, and married in 18 35 
Susannah \Vhite, daughter of the late Hiram White, of Vaughan, by whom 
he has six children, all living. Mr. Shunk has taken a lively interest in 
agricultural matters, having especially turned his attention to the breeding 
of horses, and having sold some very fine teams. On one occasion he sold a 
single horse for the high price of $700, which sNfficiently proves that the 
time and care he devotes to stock raising is justified by results. His farm 
is considered one of the finest and best cultivated in the section. He is an 
adherent of the 'l\Iethodist Church, and in politics a Conservative. 


\VILLIAM SIMMONS, hotel proprietor, Thornhill, was born in Notting- 
hamshire, England, April II, 1844. He emigrated to Canada in 1867, and 
first located at Belleville, where he was employed on the" Grand Trunk Rail- 
way. He then went to l'vIichigan, where he remained two years; and the 
subsequent seven years he was employed as engineer on the Great Vvestern 
Division of the G. T. Railway. In the year 1884 he purchased his present 
hotel in the Village of Thornhill, where he has excellent accommodation 
for the travelling public, including good stabling. He married Mary Ann 
Callasas, of Lincolnshire, England. Mr. Simmons has done a large amount 
of foreign travel, and possesses at the present time some property in New 
Zealand. 


DAVID SMELLIE, lot 8, concession 3, was born in the Township of 
Vaughan in 1833, on the farm on which he now resides, being the eldest of 
the family of the late David Smellie. The latter emigrated from Lanark- 
shire, Scotland, in the fall of 1830. He came alone, and for the first year 
after his arrival worked at York Mills; he then purchased the farm in 
Vaughan now owned and occupied by his son, where he lived until his 
death in 1860. He was a man well-known in the surrounding townships 
and exercised considerable influence in municipal matters, and was for a 
number of years a member of the Township Council. He took a leading 
position in all matters relating to Agriculture, and was generally recognized 
as being of great service to the different societies. He took prizes at 
all the township fairs, his specialties being Leicestershire and Cotswold 
sheep, and Ayrshire Cattle. At his death, the loss to the community was 



Township oj Vaugllan. 


3 6 5 


felt to be great, and his memory is still cherished by some of the old 
inhabitants independently of the surviving members of his family. His son, 
DavId, on his father's death, came into possession of a very handsome 
heritage, and it may be fairly stated that without exception he owns the 
finest farm in the township. It is compact and neat in every particular, 
and the grounds and surroundings bear ample proof of the care and labour 
lavished upon them; the style of cultivation is also greatly above the aver- 
age. Mr. Smellie married in the year 1873. His wife was Martha Jane, 
born in York Township, and sister of \Villiam James, of that section; they 
have a family of three children. Mr. Smellie is an adherent of the Presby- 
terian Church, and a Reformer in politics. 


JACOB SMITH, lot 15, concession 5, was born in Somerset County, 
Pennsylvania, in the year 1817, being the eldest son of the late John Smith 
mentioned' elsewhere. He was but twelve months old when he came to 
Canada with his parents, with whom he continued to live until 1845. He 
then moved on to lot 16, concession 5, where he remained until 1869, in 
which year he located in the Village of Maple, where he still resides. He 
married in the year 1845, his wife being Elizabeth, daughter of the late 
John \Vhite, of this township. He is a Mennonite in religion, and a Con- 
servative in politics. 


SAMUEL SMITH, lot 7, concession 4, is the third son of the late Jacob 
Smith, who emigrated from Pennsylvania in company with his parents 
shortly after the American vVar of 1812. They settled on the farm now 
owned by our subject. Samuel's grandfather belonged to the Mennonite 
Church and took considerable interest in its welfare, and having received 
a good education he often in his younger days exhorted the members of 
the church. Samuel was born on the old homestead in 1833, and was 
married in the year 1866 to Sarah, daughter of Mr. Samuel Snider, by 
whom he has four children. He belongs to the old Mennonite Church, 
but takes very little interest in politics, giving his support to good measures 
rather than party. 


JOHN SNIDER, lot 17, concession 5, is decended from a family who 
emigrated from the State of Pennsylvania (near the Susquehanna River) 
in the year 1800. He is the eldest son of the late Jacob Snider, who was 
born during the journey his parents made from the States to Canada. 
Jacob Snider settled on the farm now owned by his son John, and in the 
early days of settlement proved very useful amongst his neighbours (on 
account of his skill in surgery) before the advent of the medical profession 



3 66 


Biographical N otz"ces. 


which is now so ably represented. He died on the farm in 1864, at the age 
of sixty-four years. His wife's name was Fanny Mussulman, who is still 
liYing being about eighty-four years of age. John, the subject of this sketch 
was born in 1821, near the Village of Maple. and was about nine years of 
age, when his father located on the farm now in his own possession. He 
has a lively recollection of the hardships to which they were in the early 
times subjected, and remembers when the first trees were cut on the lot for 
building purposes. He was married in 1852 to Mary Sturp, by whom he 
has three children living. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and a 
Conservative in politics. 


JAMES SOMERVILLE, lot 14, concession 10, was born in 1843 on the lot 
where he now resides. He is the second son of the late James Somerville, 
who emigrated from Lanarkshire, Scotland, in 1836, and settled in Vaughan 
on the same land now occupied by James, jun'r. Mr. Somerville, sen'r, 
took a lively and intelligent interest in the affairs of the municipality, and 
was a member of the Township Council for some years. He was a devout 
member of the Presbyterian Church, and was an Elder for about twelve 
years previous to his death. Before the church was built the religious 
services presided over by Dr. Jennings were conducted at the house of Mr. 
Somerville. He died in 1873, being sixty-three years of age. J ames from 
his youth upwards resided on the old homestead, and takes considerable 
pride in the cultivation of the farm. He does a good deal of stock-raising, 
principally Durham cattle. He belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and is 
a Reformer in politics. 


ROBERT SOMERVILLE, lot 14, concession 10, was born on his present lot. 
He is the eldest son of the late James Somerville, who was born in Lanark- 
shire, Scotland, and emigrated to Canada, locating in the Township of 
Vaughan at an early day. The late Mr. Somerville took a lively interest in 
municipal matters, and was a member of the Township Council for a 
number of years. He continued to live on the farm until his death in 1873, 
at the age of sixty-two years. He was an Elder of the Presbyterian 
Church. Robert Somerville was married in the year 1876 to Mary Ann 
Goodall, by whom he has four children. He belongs to the Presbyterian 
Church, and is a Reformer in politics. 


ROBERT SOMERVILLE, lot 17, concession 9, is the eldest son of the late 
Archibald Somerville, who settled in the township about 1837. His father 
was a native of Lanarkshire, Scotland. He lived on the farm in Vaughan 
until 1876, in which year he purchased a farm in Chinguacousy Township, 



Township of Vaughan. 


3 6 7 


Peel County, where he lived until his death in 1873, at the age of fifty-seven 
years. He was an active member of the Presbyterian Church, and a 
Reformer in politics. His wife survives him, and lives in Peel County. 
Robert was borlJ- in 1847, on the lot where he still resides. He married in 
1880 :l\1ary Elizabeth, daughter of John Pearson, of Brampton; they have 
one child. Mr. Somerville is a Presbyterian in religion, and a teacher in 
Sabbath schools. In politics he is a Reformer. 


JOHN C. STEELE, lot 26, conceSSIOn I, hotel proprietor, was born in 
Vaughan Township, near Atkinson's Mills, in the year 1837. He is the 
only son of the late Thomas Steele, who settled in the township at an early 
day, and followed farming for a considerable time, and in connection 
therewith also kept an hotel at Bond Lake; he died in Vaughan Township 
in the same house where our subject now conducts the hotel known as 
The Green Bush. John C. is a joiner by trade, and worked for a number 
of years in Toronto. He subsequently commenced in the hotel business in 
Alma, \Vellington County, and continued there for twelve years. He 
started his present hotel in 1877, where every attention is paid to the 
travelling public. Mr. Steele was married in the year 1858, his wife's 
maiden name being Mary A. Robertson, by whom he has seven children, 
two boys and five girls. He is an adherent of the Presbyterian Church, 
and a Conservative in politics. Mr. Steele's parents were natives of York- 
shire, England. 
"THOMAS H. STEELE, lot 20, concession 9, was born on the farm he now 
resides on, being the youngest son of the late Daniel Steele, who settled 
in Vaughan about the year 1841. He came from Napanee in the Bay of 
Quinté, and at the time of his first settlement in Vaughan there were no 
roads, only the old Indian trail. He was an earnest and devoted member 
of the Methodist Church, and besides being a class leader was also a local 
preacher. He died in 1873 at the age of sixty-five years. Thomas H. 
married in 1871, his wife being Mary, daughter of Robert King, of this 
township; they have a family of five children. Mr. Steele is an adherent 
of the Methodist Church, and votes with the Reform Party. 


JAMES A. STEVENSON, lot 20, concession 8, was born in 1848 in the 
Township of Vaughan, on the lot now occupied by him. He is the only 
son of the late James Stevenson, one of the early settlers, who came from 
Glasgow, Scotland, and located here when only seventeen years old. He 
settled on a farm in the township, where he remained quite a number of 
years, and in 1853 located on lot 30, concession 8, where he died in 1862. 



3 68 


Biographical Notices. 


Mr. Stevenson, sen'r, was for many years a member of the Agricultural 
Society. 1\1r. James A. Stevenson married in the year 1872 Eliza Hartly, 
by whom he has four children. He belongs to the Congregational Church, 
and is in politics a Reformer. 


JOSEPH STONG, lot I, concession 5, is a Canadian by birth, being the 
third son of the late Daniel Stong, who emigrated from Pennsylvania in the 
year 1809 in company with his parents. They settled in Vaughan on lot 23, 
concession 3. The father of our subject assisted to brush the town line 
between York and Vaughan. Joseph was born in the year 1826; he 
married Elizabeth Snider in the year 1849, who was also born in Vaughan, 
being a daughter of the late Jacob Snider, who was Collector and Assessor 
for the Township a number of years. They have a family of five children, 
three sons and two daughters, all of whom are married and in good circum- 
stances. The family are adherents of the Methodist Church, and Mr. Stong 
is a Reformer in politics. His mother is still living and resides with him; 
she is eighty-six years old. 


THOMAS TEDDER, lot 25, concession 9, is of English birth, being the 
second son of the late William Tedder, who emigrated from the County of 
Norfolk, England, and settled near Woodbridge. In r859 Mr. Tedder, 
sen'r, moved on to the farm where our subject now resides, and remained 
there until his death in 1882, at the age of sixty-seven years. He was an 
active worker in the cause of the Gospel in his day, and was a class leader 
in the Methodist Church about thirty-five years. Thomas was born oft the 
old homestead in 1844, and has all his life devoted his attention to farming. 
He was married in 1866, his wife's maiden name being Mary McGillivray; 
her father was the late Neil McGillivray, of this township. They have 
no family. 


SAMU EL THOMPSON, lot 35, concession 2, is from the county of broad 
acres Yclept Yorkshire, England, where he was born in the year 1812, and 
where he spent the early portion of his life. About the year 1830, accom- 
panied by his stepfather, Thomas Grundy, his mother and other members 
of the family, he came to Canada. They settled first at Unionville, in con- 
cession 6 of Markham, and there Samuel continued to reside, working with 
his stepfather, who was a blacksmith by trade. He subsequently worked 
on the farm of Mr. Robert Grundy in the same township for several years, 
and finally, in 1850, purchased the farm in Vaughan, on which he still 
resides, and which he still cultivates. In 1847 he married a daughter of his 
former employer, Mr. Robert Grundy, by whom he had eleven children, 



TownS/lip of Vaughan. 


3 6 9 


nine being still living. He is a member of the Methodist Church, of which 
he is a Trustee, and generously presented the lot upon which the edifice 
was erected. The first church was burnt down, and IVlr. Thompson was 
instrumental in having it rebuilt. He is a Reformer in politics. 


JOHN TRAIN, lot 27, concession 8, was born in the City of Toronto in 
the year 1832, he being the eldest son of the late Christopher Train, who 
emigrated from Hull, Yorkshire, England, the year previous to the birth of 
our subject. His father, after his arrival in Canada, came direct to York 
County, and for the first two years, remained in Toronto, where he engaged 
in sawing lumber, but, on account of ill health was obliged to quit that 
business. He bought a farm in Vaughan Township, on lot 20, concession 10, 
where he remained some time. He was induced to try Toronto again. and 
after battling vainly against ill-health, he was obliged once more to seek 
the repose and pure air of the country. He came back to Vaughan, and 
after a lapse of eight or nine years he bought the farm where Elder's Mill 
now stands, and commenced to operate the saw-mill, renting off the agri- 
cultural part of his property. After a time he sold his farm and mill and 
returned to his first purchase in concession 10; this in turn he sold, and 
finally bought the farm on which his son, John, now resides. He died in 
1857, at the age of fifty-eight years. John Train followed his father's 
business, and runs a saw-mill on his property in Vaughan, and in addition 
has one in the neighbourhood of Georgian Bay, where he does a large 
lumbering trade. In 1856 he espoused Ann, daughter of Mr. Thomas 
Gimmerson, a native of Wallace Township. They have nine sons and two 
daughters. Mr. Train has taken scarcely any interest in municipal matters; 
he belongs to the Methodist Church, and is a Conservative in politics. 


SAMUEL TROYER, lots I and 2, concession 3, was born in the Township 
of Vaughan in the year 1838, and is the fifth son of the late Christian Troyer, 
minister of the Mennonite Church for upwards of forty years, a Canadian 
by birth, who settled in Vaughan at an early period in its history. His 
mother was born on Y onge Street, near Thornhill, and was a daughter of 
the late Nicholas Cober who died in the year 1842. His people on both 
sides were originally from Pennsylvania, U. S. His father commenced 
farming on lot 5, concession 3, where he lived for twenty-six years, after 
which he moved on to the farm which is now in the hands of our subject. 
Mr. Troyer was married in the year r865, his wife's maiden name being 
ßlary Ann Baldwin, a Canadian by birth; the fruit of this union was a 
family of six children, all living. They belong to the Presbyterian Church. 

Ir. Troyer is not much of a politician, but countenances good measures, 
25 



37 0 


Biog-raplzical Notices. 


rather than support hard and fast lines of party. The house on Y onge 
Street, near Thornhill, formerly in the possession of his grandfather, was 
the fifth built north of Toronto. 


JACOB TWYER, lot 8, concession 8, was born in York Township in 1829, 
and is a descendant of a family who came from Pennsylvania at an early 
day. He is the fourth son of the late Jacob Twyer, an early settler of York. 
He was a member of the Lutheran Church. Our subject was married in 
the year 1859 to Mary Hackins, a daughter of the late James Hackins, of 
Albion Township, by whom he has twelve children, all living. Mr. Twyer 
is an adherent of the Bible Christian Church, and is a Reformer in politics. 


PETER V ANDERBUIGHER, lot 24, concession 2, is descended from a 
U. E. Loyalist family, who came from Pennsylvania, U. S. His father 
was Richard Vanderbuigher, who was born in Markham Township, 
his parents being amongst the very earliest settlers there. Peter was also 
born in Markham in the year 1817. In the year 1843 he purchased the 
farm in Vaughan, where he still resides. In 1843 he married Mary Ann 
Marsh, of Canadian birth, and daughter of the late James Marsh, of Mark- 
ham Township; by this marriage he has seven children. He belongs to 
the Presbyterian Church, and is a Conservative in politics. 


PETER G. WARDLAW, lot 21, concession 9, was born in the Township 
of Etobicoke, in the year 1851, being the second son of Mr. Peter \Vardlaw, 
who resides on lot 24, concession A of that township. Mr. Peter G. \Vard- 
law was married in 1875, his wife's maiden name being Elizabeth Parsons, 
daughter of Mr. Matthew Parsons, of York Township. They have a family 
of three children. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a 
Reformer in politics. 


JAMES WATSON, lot 23, concession 3, was born at Gambleton, Scotland, 
in the year 1820, and came to Canada with his parents when but two years 
of age. His father, the late John Watson, on arriving with his family at 
Toronto moved up at once into Vaughan Township, and located on lot 9, 
concession 2, where he remained a few years. Apparently not satisfied 
with his position he gave up the farm and hired himself out for a length of 
time, subsequently locating on lot 23, concession 5, where he lived six years. 
He tried two other localities before ultimately settling on lot 25, concession 
4, where he died. The subject of this sketch commenced life on his own 
account by threshing, which branch of industry he followed for over twenty- 
seven years. In 1866 he purchased the farm he now holds, and which he 



Township of Vaughan. 


37 1 


has farmed very successfully up to the present. He married in 1858 Nancy 
Jane White: they have a family of three children. He belongs to the 
Presbyterian Church, and is a Reformer in politics. 
THOMAS WATSON, lot 32, concession 4, is a native of Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, and was born in the year 1814' He emigrated to Canada in the year 
18 3 1 , and the subsequent eleven years worked for different farmers in and 
about Thornhill, amongst others the late Mr. Thorn. He then purchased 
land in the Township of Vaughan on which he still resides. Being economi- 
cal as well as industrious he has become the owner of two other farms, and 
possesses now a considerable amount of property. Mr. Watson was married 
in the year 1835, his wife's maiden name being Hannah IYlorrison: they 
have a family of seven children living. He has taken no active part in 
municipal affairs, his own business and family having absorbed his whole 
time and attention. He belongs to the Episcopal Church, and is a Conser- 
vative in politics. 


\V ILLIAM \V A TSON, lot 7, concession 6, is a native of Lanarkshire, 
Scotland, where h'e was born in the year 1831. He came to Canada in 
18 5 6 , and settled in Markham Township, York County, where he remained 
about two years. He then moved into Scarboro' Township, where he 
stayed seventeen years, subsequently locating on lot 7, concession 6, in the 
Township of Vaughan. Mr. \Vatson was married before he left Scotland; 
his family consists of seven children, all living. He has exerted himself 
very much in church matters, and is an elder of the Presbyterian body. He 
is a Reformer in politics. While a resident in Scarboro' Township he took 
considerable interest in the Agricultural Society, of which he was a director. 


GEORGE WELDRICK, lot 35, concession I. This gentleman, so well 
known in connection with agricultural matters in the township and county, 
was born in Hull, Yorkshire, England, in 1828. He emigrated to Canada 
in 1849, and settled in Scarboro' Township, where for a short time he ran a 
threshing machine, subsequently renting a farm. He afterwards rented a 
farm from Mr. T. Langstaff, near Thornhill, in Markham Township, which 
he cultivated and resided upon about fourteen years. He then purchased 
his present farm, which has now been in his possession about fourteen years. 
He was married in the year 1852, his wife being Hannah, daughter of the late 
\Vill-iam Boynton, of Markham Township: he has a family of three sons and 
one daughter. Mr.\Veldrick has in his possession several prizes and diplomas 
received from the County and Provincial Fairs, awarded to him for excel- 
lence in his breeds of cattle and sheep, together with horses. His Leicester 



37 2 


Biographical Notices. 


Cotswold sheep and Durham cattle are much admired. In other matters 
connected with agriculture he has always shown a desire to promote its 
interests in his section; and, by adopting the most complete methods, has 
been the cause of much emulation amongst his neighbours, to the general 
benefit of the township. Mr. Weldrick in politics is now a Conservative, 
having in recent years altered his opinions on the National Policy. He 
is an adherent of the Methodist Church, and highly respected wherever he 
is known. 


HIRAM \VHITE, lot 8, concession 3, is a native of Vaughan Township, 
and was born on the farm where he now lives. His father, the late Hiram 
\Vhite, was one of the first settlers in the section, there being but three 
houses when he first located there. Mr. White, sen'r, was from Vermont, 
U.S., but is descended from an English family who settled in that State 
before the Revolutionary War. On coming to Canada he first settled in 
Etobicoke Township on the Humber River, but remained there only a short 
time, subsequently moving into Vaughan where he lived until his death. 
He had a family of nine children, five sons and four daughters, Hiram and 
one sister, Mrs. Simon Shink, being the only two living of this family. l\1r. 
White married in 1853 a daughter of Mr. William Keefer, by whom he 
has a family of seven children. He is connected with the English Church, 
and in politics is a supporter of the Reform party. 


ROBERT WILSON, lot 23, concession 5, was born in the Township of 
Chinguacousy, Peel County, in the year 1841. He is the eldest son of Mr. 
John Wilson of that township, who emigrated from the County of Cumber- 
land, England, about the year 1827. He settled in the Township of 
Chinguacousy, where he purchased land on lot 9, concession I, west of the 
centre, where he has since continued to live. Mr. Wilson, sen'r, married 
after his arrival in Canada, his wife's name being Ellen Craig; they had a 
family of six sons and four daughters, of whom five sons and two daughters 
are living. Robert Wilson has never married. He is a member of the 
Methodist Church, and a Conservative in politics. 


DAVID WITHERSPOON, lot 25, concession 7, was born in the Township 
of Vaughan on lot 12, concession 7, in the year 1856, being the youngest son 
of Mr. Peter Witherspoon, an old settler in the township, who has now 
retired and lives at Woodbridge. Mr. Witherspoon was married in the 
year 1883. His wife's maiden name was Mary Blough, daughter of Mr. 
John Blough of Vaughan Township, by whom he had one child. In 
religion he is a Presbyterian; in politics a Reformer. 



VILLAGE OF RICHMOND HILL. 



VILLAGE OF RICHl\10ND HILf. 


f> 
,
 
I _
 . _ . 
 AVID BO
LE, ex-ReeveoftheTownship
fVaughan,is anat
ve 
ÐJ, of Ayrshlre, Scotland, where he was born III 1821. In the sprIng 
.
: Ii of 18 4 2 he emigrated to Canada, and located at York Mills, 
1j!jJ. where he worked as blacksmith for twelve years. He then took 
-vf a farm in concession 2 of East York, on which he lived for 
five years, and subsequently purchased two hundred and fifteen 
acres of land, where there was a saw-mill which he operated until 1881, when 
he retired. He has held the offices of Reeve, Deputy-Reeve, and School 
Trustee; all of these offices he has satisfactorily filled. In 1848 he married 
Miss Ann \Villiamson, a native of England; they had born to them the 
following children, viz.: David, born 1850; John, born 1852; Mary Ann, 
born 1853; Agnes, born 1855, died in 1872; Matthew, born 1857. 


WILLIAM FRENCH, carriage manufacturer, Richmond Hill, was born in 
Scotland in 1832, and came to Canada with his parents in 1835. His father 
was a blacksmith, and on his arrival in York first located at Elgin Mills. 
His mother's maiden name was Sarah Craige. William learned his trade 
with his father, and in 1857 went into business on his own account at 
Richmond Hill. In 1878 he opened his present commodious place of 
business, a large building of three storeys high, and I lOX 30 feet measure- 
settler in the township, and emigrated from the North of Ireland to Canada 
in the year 1823. He purchased lot II, concession 4, on which he settled 
ment, where he employs fifteen men, and conducts a business of $20,000 
annually. His establishment is fitted up with all the latest improvements 
in machinery, which is driven by an engine of sixteen horse-power. In 
addition to this manufacturing industry Mr. French owns a farm of one 
hundred acres in Vaughan Township, being a part of lot 23, concession 2, 
which he cultivates. Mr. French has also taken an active part in municipal 
affairs, and has occupied the position of Village Reeve; he is now a School 
Trustee. He was married in 1859, his family being as follows: Annie, 
Frank, Thomas, Mary, vVycliffe, Matilda, Susan and William. 



. 


37 6 


Bt"ographz.cal Notices. 


DR. JAMES LANGSTAFF, of Richmond Hill, the youngest of eight children, 
was born near Thornhill in 1825. His father, John Langstaff, from New 
Jersey, U. S., was married on Yonge Street in 1808, to Lucy Miles, daughter 
of Abner Miles, named in Dr. Scadding's " Toronto of Old." Dr. Lang- 
staff studied two years as house-pupil with Dr. Rolph, also two years in 
Guy's Hosp
al, London, England. He commenced practice in Unionville 
in the spring of 1849, but removed in the following September to Richmond 
Hill, where he has continued to reside up to the present time, and is still in 
the active practice of his profession. He has been twice married, first to 
Mary Ann Miller, daughter of Henry Miller, Esq., of Thornhill, who died 
in 1879, leaving four children. In 1882 he was married to E. F. Louisa 
Palmer, daughter of J. \V. Palmer, \Vhitby. In politics Dr. J. Langstaff 
has been an active Reformer, although his father and three brothers were 
ranged on the opposite side. He has been a member of the Presbyterian 
Church for many years, and has always taken an active part in the 
temperance cause. 


J OHN PALMER, hotel proprietor, was born in Devonshire, England, in 
1840, and came with his parents John and Frances (Holman) Palmer to 
Canada in 1
43' Our subject worked on his father's farm until 1865, and in 
that year purchased the Robin Hood Hotel, which he conducted only six 
months. After selling the property he bought the stage which plied between 
Stouffville and Toronto. In 1849 he bought the property known as The 
Palmer House, Richmond Hill, which he rebuilt in 1874, and which with 
an additional two acres of land is valued at $15,000. He also owns a farm 
of one hundred and seven and a-half acres, being part of lot 46, concession 
I of Markham. Mr. Palmer takes considerable interest in the raising of 
heavy-draught horses, and has imported some of the best stallions ever 
introduced into the country. In 1868 he married Delia Veley of Vaughan 
Township, by whom he has two children: \Valter, born 1869, and Jennie, 
born 1879. 


_o


o_ 

 



. 


TOWNSHIP OF KING. 



. 



. 


TOWNSHIP OF KING. 


i.
 

 . 
IEUTENANT-COLONEL ARTHUR ARMSTRONG, 

 i ''è!!. deceased, was born in Ireland in 1812. He emigrated to Canada 
, - 
 in 1836, and locating in York County purchased lot 24, concession 
, '\ 9, King Township. He filled several important offices during his 
,.. . ,$ ( 
) career, and was in 1838 appointed a J.P. He gave very 
j 
 
 valuable assistance to the Government during the troublous 
times of 1837, and was authorized by the Governor-General to 
raise a company, which he succeeded in doing in the short period of four 
days. He was taken prisoner by a party of Rebels who endeavoured by 
threats to coerce him into joining their ranks, but it is scarcely necessary 
to add without success. Baring his bosom he gave them to understand 
that his life was at their disposal if they wished to take it, but his loyalty 
to the Crown should never be questioned. Through his instrumentality the 
whole party were afterwards arrested. He was appointed the first Clerk of 
the Division Court, which position he occupied about ten years. In 1865 
he took a first-class certificate at the School of Military Instruction. He 
cleared over three hundred acres of land. He died in the year 1880, after 
a long, useful and honourable life. 


ARTHUR ARMSTRONG, son of